More Than Petticoats: Remarkable Connecticut Women

Overview

Despite being the third smallest state, Connecticut can claim more than its share of remarkable women who have made lasting social, political, and cultural contributions to both their own state and to their nation. From Prudence Crandall, Connecticut's official State Heroine, who braved imprisonment for opening a school for black girls, to Harriet Beecher Stowe, whose classic Uncle Tom's Cabin urged the nation on a path towards abolition of slavery, to Margaret Fogarty Rudkin, who changed the nation's eating ...

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Overview

Despite being the third smallest state, Connecticut can claim more than its share of remarkable women who have made lasting social, political, and cultural contributions to both their own state and to their nation. From Prudence Crandall, Connecticut's official State Heroine, who braved imprisonment for opening a school for black girls, to Harriet Beecher Stowe, whose classic Uncle Tom's Cabin urged the nation on a path towards abolition of slavery, to Margaret Fogarty Rudkin, who changed the nation's eating habits with her healthful bread made at Pepperidge Farm, Connecticut women have broken the rules to make their own and in the process improved their world, and ultimately ours, forever.

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Editorial Reviews

KLIATT
Brief sketches of thirteen Connecticut women, all born before 1900, who broke through social, political, or racial barriers comprise this entry in the More Than Petticoats series. Anna Warner Bailey (1758-1851) aided in the War of 1812 in Groton by offering her own red flannel petticoat to be used as wadding for cartridges for the village militia. The startled soldiers at Fort Griswold ran the petticoat up the flagpole as a sign of American defiance. Julia and Abby Smith of Glastonbury lost their farmland and cows in 1874 for back taxes, which they had refused to pay because they could not vote. They finally won their court case in 1876, but still had to pay taxes and still could not vote. They continued to lobby for women's rights. Prudence Crandall (1803-1890) of Canterbury was jailed for running a school to educate young black women in violation of the Black Law passed by the State of Connecticut in 1833. Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896) wrote Uncle Tom's Cabin and along with her family strongly influenced the abolition movement. Caroline Maria Hewins (1846-1926) was a pioneer in library services for children. Martha Minerva Franklin (1870-1968) was a founding member of the National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses in 1908. Mary Jobe Akeley (1878-1966) became an explorer in Africa after the death of her husband, collecting plants and animals for exhibition. She worked tirelessly during her life to preserve African wildlife and vegetation. Katharine Houghton Hepburn (1878-1951), mother of the actress Kate Hepburn, was a wealthy and proper Victorian lady from Hartford who became a champion of sexual freedom and women's suffrage. Sophie Tucker (1884-1966) was a show businesssuccess who worked for Flo Ziegfeld (briefly) and later in vaudeville as well as movies. Margaret Fogarty Rudkin (1897-1967) founded Pepperidge Farm, appearing in company ads during the 1950s. Eva Lutz Butler (1897-1969) was a teacher, historian, and anthropologist. She was cited in 1866 as "the authority for ethno-history of New England and the most gifted interpreter of the region's Indian and Colonial History." Gladys Tantaquidgeon (1899-) is a medicine woman of the Mohegan tribe. KLIATT Codes: JSA—Recommended for junior and senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2004, Globe Pequot, 163p. illus. bibliog. index., Ages 12 to adult.
—Janet Julian
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780762723713
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/1/2003
  • Series: More than Petticoats Series
  • Pages: 176
  • Product dimensions: 5.84 (w) x 9.18 (h) x 0.56 (d)

Meet the Author

Antonia Petrash was born and raised in New York and enjoys a deep and abiding interest in the history of the area, especially the history of its extraordinary women. In addition to her writing career, she works as a librarian and archivist and manages a small local history collection on Long Island. She is also the author of Globe Pequot's More than Petticoats: Remarkable New York Women.

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Table of Contents

(1) Introduction (2) Anna Warner Bailey (3) Julia Evalina Smith and Abby Haddassah Smith (4) Prudence Crandall (5) Harriet Beecher Stowe (6) Caroline Maria Hewins (7) Martha Minerva Franklin (8) Mary Jobe Akeley (9) Katharine Houghton Hepburn (10) Sophie Tucker (11) Margaret Fogarty Rudkin (12) Eva Lutz Butler (13) Gladys Tantaquidgeon

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