More than Petticoats: Remarkable Georgia Women

Overview

This captivating group of fourteen spirited women from the Peach State includes Margaret Mitchell, author of the world's most beloved novel; Ellen Craft, an escaped slave who, after a harrowing trip to freedom, returned to Georgia to teach African American children; "Ma" Rainey, known as the "Mother of the Blues"; Juliette Gordon Low, founder of the Girl Scouts; and Mary Bosomworth, half-Indian, half-white, who profoundly impacted the first ...

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Overview

This captivating group of fourteen spirited women from the Peach State includes Margaret Mitchell, author of the world's most beloved novel; Ellen Craft, an escaped slave who, after a harrowing trip to freedom, returned to Georgia to teach African American children; "Ma" Rainey, known as the "Mother of the Blues"; Juliette Gordon Low, founder of the Girl Scouts; and Mary Bosomworth, half-Indian, half-white, who profoundly impacted the first colonization of Georgia.

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Editorial Reviews

KLIATT
Each of these women from Georgia was remarkable because she went her own way, and acted, interacted and created as she saw needs and opportunities. The women whom Martin presents to the readers range in chronology from Mary Musgrove Bosomworth, born of an English father and a Creek Indian mother, who acted as translator and negotiator for James Oglethorpe, Georgia's founder, to Margaret Mitchell, famed creator of Scarlet O'Hara, who planted an indelible image of Civil War Georgia in the minds and on the movie screens of America. Martin details the lives and struggles of 13 Georgian women of energy and ideals. Each chapter is fairly short (13-15 pages) and clearly written. Some of the women, however, catch the enthusiasm of the author and the reader more than others. Martha McChesney Berry, for example, started a simple Bible class for local children in the mountains north of Rome, Georgia, toward the end of the 19th century. When she died in 1942, after many years of fund raising and teaching, she was buried on the campus of Berry College, the fruit of her struggle against the odds. Dr. Leila Daughtry Denmark, who celebrated her 103rd birthday on February 1, 2001, was, at the time of her 100th birthday, the oldest practicing physician in the United States. Her family practice is legendary in Georgia, where she has treated three generations of children. Lugenia Burns Hope, wife of John Hope, president of Morehouse College and the Atlanta University Alliance, had her own career as a social worker, organizer, and activist. Also included in this roster of female Georgian achievers are Juliet Gordon Low, founder of the Girl Scouts, Ma Rainey, the blues singer, Leila Ross Wilburn, a pioneerarchitect, Ellen Craft, a runaway slave and activist, and Lillian Smith, author and advocate for civil rights. This carefully researched book can provide useful enrichment reading. KLIATT Codes: JS—Recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2003, Globe Pequot, 183p. illus. bibliog. index., Moore
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780762712700
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/28/2002
  • Series: More than Petticoats Series
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 1,471,558
  • Product dimensions: 6.48 (w) x 9.12 (h) x 0.57 (d)

Meet the Author

Suburban Atlanta resident Sara Hines Martin, author of Walking Atlanta, has been writing professionally for 44 years. She has master's degrees in religious education and counseling and her own private counseling practice. She has lived in two Third World countries and traveled extensively.

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Read an Excerpt

According to the Dictionary of American Negro Biography: "In a black theater in 1925, the curtains opened to reveal a huge hand-cranked Victrola. From inside, a gravelly voice sings. Then the doors open, and Ma Rainey steps out." Her gold teeth filling her large mouth sparkle in the blue spotlight. The stage lights give her dark complexion-spread heavily with greasepaint, powder, and rouge to lighten her skin-a golden color.
Although most of the black blues singers were pretty women, Gertrude "Ma" Rainey was a stocky, squat, big, homely woman. "Black performers said she had 'the ugliest face in show business,'" wrote Sandra Lieb in Mother of the Blues. "Thick straightened hair sticking out in all directions, gold caps on her huge teeth, a fan of ostrich plumes in her hand, and a long triple necklace of shiny gold coins reflecting the blue spotlight that danced on her sequined black dress, Ma was a sight to behold."
She dressed in a bright, flashy style, wearing elaborately styled gowns of maroon, blue, or gold beaded satin, sometimes with sequins. She wore glittery jewelry, often donning a famous necklace and earrings made of gold pieces, or diamond-studded tiaras, rings, and bracelets.

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Table of Contents

Introduction

Mary Musgrove Matthews Bosomworth
Pocahontas of Georgia

Sarah Freeman Clarke
Nineteenth Century Artist

Ellen Craft
Runaway Slave

Rebecca Latimer Felton
First Women United States Senator

Mary Ellen "Nellie" Peters Black
Mover and Shaker

Juliette Gordon Low
America's First Girl Scout

Martha McChesney Berry
Miracle Lady of the Mountains

Lugenia Burns Hope
Social Activist

Leila Ross Wilburn
Pioneer Architect

Gertrude "Ma" Rainey
Mother of the Blues

Helen Douglas Mankin
A Woman in the House

Lillian Smith
Conscience of the South

Dr. Leila Daughtry Denmark
Giving Children a Chance

Margaret Mitchell
Author of the World's Favorite Novel

Bibliography

Index

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