Morgy Makes His Move

Overview

Morgy hates being the new kid in a new school in a new town in a new state. He wishes he were back in California. Here in Massachusetts he has to cont with Ferguson, who's older and seems to have singled out Morgy to pick on. Ferguson is even there when Morgy tries to learn how to play hockey, and he never misses a chance to dump Morgy on the ice. And hockey becomes even more humiliating when Morgy is demoted from the ten-and-unders to the seven-and-unders, where he's the oldest kid on the team.Each day brings ...
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Overview

Morgy hates being the new kid in a new school in a new town in a new state. He wishes he were back in California. Here in Massachusetts he has to cont with Ferguson, who's older and seems to have singled out Morgy to pick on. Ferguson is even there when Morgy tries to learn how to play hockey, and he never misses a chance to dump Morgy on the ice. And hockey becomes even more humiliating when Morgy is demoted from the ten-and-unders to the seven-and-unders, where he's the oldest kid on the team.Each day brings more things to get used to, from weird Boston accents to surviving the blizzard of the century. Gradually, though, Morgy begins to figure out life in Puckett Corner and learns that he just might fit in after all.Morgy hates being the new kid in a new school in a new town in a new state. He wishes he were back in California. Here in Massachusetts he has to cont with Ferguson, who's older and seems to have singled out Morgy to pick on. Ferguson is even there when Morgy tries to learn how to play hockey, and he never misses a chance to dump Morgy on the ice. And hockey becomes even more humiliating when Morgy is demoted from the ten-and-unders to the seven-and-unders, where he's the oldest kid on the team.Each day brings more things to get used to, from weird Boston accents to surviving the blizzard of the century. Gradually, though, Morgy begins to figure out life in Puckett Corner and learns that he just might fit in after all.

When third-grader Morgy MacDougal-MacDuff moves from California to Massachusetts with his parents, he has a lot of new things to get used to before he feels comfortable.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Greg M. Romaneck
Morgy hates being the new kid in school. He and his family have moved from California to Puckett Corner, Massachusetts and Morgy is having trouble fitting in. Morgy's first day of school ends with him being both lost and stuck in a tree with his pet cat. A bully named Ferguson begins to pick on Morgy every day at recess. Ferguson continues to torment Morgy when he tries to master the game of ice hockey. Ferguson does everything he can to make Morgy's life difficult. To make matters worse, Morgy's coach demotes him from the ten-and-under team to the seven-and-unders where he is the oldest kid on the ice. Meanwhile, Morgy and his family have to adapt to the cold winters of New England. Thanksgiving brings the blizzard of the century. Gradually Morgy finds his place not only in Puckett Corner but also in his family. The birth of twin sisters helps Morgy to see that he does fit in and has a place in his new hometown. This is an excellent story for children dealing with the after effects of moving. It's a lighthearted story with complimentary illustrations that enhance the plot.
Library Journal
Gr 2-5-Fans of Louis Sachar's "Marvin Redpost" books (Random) or Suzy Kline's "Orp" series (Putnam) will tap into Lewis's sense of humor. Third-grader Morgy MacDougal-MacDuff has just moved with his family from California to Puckett Corner, MA. He has difficulty understanding his classmates' accents and regionalisms, and he becomes the target of a fifth-grade bully, Ferguson. However, Morgy gradually adjusts to his new surroundings and his mother makes the surprise announcement that she's expecting twins. He exhibits typical sibling concern when wondering how the new babies will fit into the family, and also worries that they might be girls. He is disappointed when the hockey coach suggests that he practice for a year with the team before actually playing, and is humiliated when he is moved down to the seven-and-under team in order to stop Ferguson's disruptions. Things finally look up for the protagonist, though, and a surprise twist at the end will delight young readers. Morgy is a realistic, well-developed character, and most children will relate to the ups and downs in his life. One or two full-page line drawings appear in each chapter.-Julie Shatterly, York County Public Library, Rock Hill, SC Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Karen Carden
Youngsters will find Morgy Makes His Move by first-time author Maggie Lewis a cozy read. Although it deals with a third grader's angst about moving, fitting in, and being bullied, it's also about warm-hearted friendships, families, and neighborhoods...Grade schoolers will appreciate the pacing, events, and humor in Morgy Makes His Move, and adults will be pleased to have such a wholesome book to put in their child's hands.
Christian Science Monitor
Kirkus Reviews
Lewis packs a lot of action into this short novel and plenty of changes into her hero's young life. Morgy has just moved from California to Massachusetts, where he gets lost on the way home after the first day of school, is repeatedly picked on by an older bully, finds out his mother is pregnant with twins, tries to learn to play hockey, and survives a chimney fire, a blizzard, and a blackout. In between trials, he makes new friends and writes to old ones, is visited by his aunt, and helps raise money for new equipment for the school playground. This lighthearted novel is filled with incident and warmth, nicely matched in tone by Chesworth's black-and-white illustrations. Especially pleasing is the easy way the members of his family and his new friend Byron's family come together during the storm, spend Thanksgiving together on the spur of the moment, and thereafter are naturally integrated into one another's lives. (Fiction. 6-9)
From the Publisher
"When third-grader Morgy MacDougal-MacDuff moves with his parents from wide-open, laid-back California (where he had lots of friends, the playground at his school overlooked the ocean, and he played soccer) to small-town, close-knit Massachusetts (where he immediately attracts the attentions of a bully, his new school doesn't even have a playground, and everyone plays ice hockey), he obviously has some adjustments to make. Maggie Lewis captures the disoriented Morgy's bewilderment, even unto the challenges of the Massachusetts lingo and accent (what is this spa his new friend Byron invites him to come along to? and what does mar mean?), with one of the lightest touches ever encountered in a new-kid-in-town story. Her characters are recognizably and believably grounded in a particular place, but they are never stereotypes: Morgy's visiting aunt from California is flaky but also understanding and good at making friends; Byron's live-in Massachusetts aunt is small-town traditional but knows when to stretch the rules and how to accept others as they are. Gradually, Morgy becomes more comfortable in his new surroundings, finding himself part of Byron's large, friendly family, enjoying an unusual mid-blizzard Thanksgiving celebration, learning to skate, and defusing the bully (with the unwitting help of his mom-sorry, his mar). At book's end, Morgy welcomes home newborn twin sisters with big-brotherly protectiveness: "If there's anything you don't know, you can ask me. I know all about this place." A superbly realized regional novel that is nonetheless universal: second- and third-grade readers from all over will enjoy watching Morgy make his move." Horn Book

"Lewis packs a lot of action into this short novel and plenty of changes into her hero's young life. Morgy has just moved from California to Massachusetts, where he gets lost on the way home after the first day of school, is repeatedly picked on by an older bully, finds out his mother is pregnant with twins, tries to learn to play hockey, and survives a chimney fire, a blizzard, and a blackout. In between trials, he makes new friends and writes to old ones, is visited by his aunt, and helps raise money for new equipment for the school playground. This lighthearted novel is filled with incident and warmth, nicely matched in tone by Chesworth's black-and-white illustrations. Especially pleasing is the easy way the members of his family and his new friend Byron's family come together during the storm, spend Thanksgiving together on the spur of the moment, and thereafter are naturally integrated into one another's lives." Kirkus Reviews

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780618196807
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 4/1/2002
  • Edition description: None
  • Pages: 82
  • Sales rank: 1,300,751
  • Age range: 6 - 9 Years
  • Lexile: 550L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Maggie Lewis lives in Ipswich, Massachusetts, with her husband and three sons. You're sure to enjoy Morgy in all three Morgy books: Morgy's Musical Summer, Morgy Coast to Coast, and Morgy Makes His Move.

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