Morning Hours: Lectures on God's Existence

Overview

The last work published by Moses Mendelssohn during his lifetime, Morning Hours (1785) is also the most sustained presentation of his mature epistemological and metaphysical views, all elaborated in the service of presenting proofs for the existence of God. But Morning Hours is much more than a theoretical treatise. It also plays a central role in the drama of the Pantheismusstreit, Mendelssohn's "dispute" with F. H. Jacobi over the nature and scope of Lessing's attitude toward Spinoza and "pantheism". As the ...

See more details below
This Paperback is Not Available through BN.com
Sending request ...

Overview

The last work published by Moses Mendelssohn during his lifetime, Morning Hours (1785) is also the most sustained presentation of his mature epistemological and metaphysical views, all elaborated in the service of presenting proofs for the existence of God. But Morning Hours is much more than a theoretical treatise. It also plays a central role in the drama of the Pantheismusstreit, Mendelssohn's "dispute" with F. H. Jacobi over the nature and scope of Lessing's attitude toward Spinoza and "pantheism". As the latest salvo in a war of texts with Jacobi, Morning Hours is also Mendelssohn's attempt to set the record straight regarding his beloved Lessing in this connection, not least by demonstrating the absence of any practical (i.e., religious or moral) difference between theism and a "purified pantheism".

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Table of Contents

First Part.- Preliminary report.- Preliminary Knowledge of Truth, Semblance, and Error.-I. What is truth?-II. Cause – Effect – Ground – Force.-III. Evidence – Of immediate Knowledge. Rational Knowledge – Knowledge of Nature.- IV. Truth and Illusion.- V. Existence – Being Awake – Dreams – Rapture.-VI. Combination of Ideas – Idealism.- VII. Continuation. The Idealist's Dispute with the Dualist. Truth-Drive and Approval- Drive. - Second Part.- Scientific Doctrinal Concepts of God's Existence.- VIII. Importance of the Investigation. On Basedow’s Principle of the Duty to Believe.- Axiomata.-IX. The evidence of the pure and the applied doctrine of magnitudes. Comparison withthe evidence for the proofs of God's existence. Different methods of those proofs.-X. Allegorical Dream. – Reason and Common Sense.- XI. Epicureanism. – Accident. – Chance. A Series of Causes and Effects, without End,without Beginning. Progression into Infinity, Forwards and Backwards. – The Timeless, without Beginning, without End and without Progression.-XII. Sufficient Reason for the Contingent in the Necessary. – The former is somewhere and sometimes, the latter is everywhere and all times. – The former is only in relation to space and time; the latter is unqualifiedly the best and most perfect. Everything that is, is best. – All God's thoughts, insofar as they have the best as their subject, attain actuality.- XIII. Spinozism. – Pantheism. – All is One and One is All. – Refutation.-XIV. Continued dispute with the pantheists. – Approximation. – Point of unison with them. – Innocuousness of the purified patheism. – Compatibility with religion and ethics insofar as they are practical.- XV. Lessing. – His Contribution to the Religion of Reason. – His Thoughts on PurifiedPantheism.-XVI. Elucidation of the concepts of necessity, contingency, independence, anddependence. – Attempt at a new proof for the existence of God on the basis of the incompleteness of self-knowledge.- XVII. The a priori Grounds of Proof of the Existence of a supremely perfect, necessary, independent Being.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)