Moroccan Roll

( 6 )

Overview

In the tradition of Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City, Steven Stanley's enthralling debut novel takes a large and fascinating cast of characters (American, French, and Moroccan, straight and gay) and transports them, and the reader, to an intriguing and exotic time and locale-fabled Morocco in the 1970s. Just as San Francisco became more than merely a setting for Tales of the City, so do Morocco's people, customs, traditions, and even its food and drink become an integral part of Moroccan Roll, a novel ...
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More About This Book

Overview

In the tradition of Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City, Steven Stanley's enthralling debut novel takes a large and fascinating cast of characters (American, French, and Moroccan, straight and gay) and transports them, and the reader, to an intriguing and exotic time and locale-fabled Morocco in the 1970s. Just as San Francisco became more than merely a setting for Tales of the City, so do Morocco's people, customs, traditions, and even its food and drink become an integral part of Moroccan Roll, a novel destined to engross the reader from its first page to its explosive climax.

Claudette-She lived a life of glamour and adventure, until a very public love affair nearly destroyed it all.

Dave-Morocco offered escape from a closeted boyfriend. Then he fell for a young-and straight-Moroccan student.

Janna-Drugs seemed the only way for her to forget the Moroccan who had broken her heart.

Marcie-She left Wisconsin to spread her wings, only to fall desperately in love with the town's most infamous playboy.

Kevin-Coming to Morocco meant a second chance at love with another man after tragedy had robbed him of his first.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780595453245
  • Publisher: iUniverse, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/19/2007
  • Pages: 432
  • Product dimensions: 5.98 (w) x 9.02 (h) x 0.96 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 25, 2010

    Terrible Read

    This is a pretty crappy book that I wouldn't suggest wasting your time reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2008

    A very good and original novel

    I had no idea what Morocco was like in the '70s, nor that there was this bunch of people from Europe and USA to teach young Moroccans, so it was very interesting for a curious person like myself. But this was just one of the many assets of this book: a sympathetic look on people, a clear insight in female and male experiences and feelings as well, a no global view on countries and cultures, the bright depiction of its characters, a romantic view of life that wasn't ashamed to give everyone a happy ending, a smooth writing that made a real pageturner of this big book, sending me to sleep very late at night sometimes 'just another chapter, another one and I quit...'. I would really like to read something more by this writer 'maybe a sequel?', who also did a very good marketing job of his dear creature, reaching people all over the world, even me in faraway Rome. And I'm grateful for that.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2008

    Wonderful Read

    An absolutely great read. Great twists and turns and great characters. It was easy to visualize every scene. I certainly hope the author intends to publish more writing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2008

    Think of it as 'Sex And The City' Morocco ...

    A previous review of Stanley debut novel, 'Moroccan Roll', compared it to Maupin's 'Tales of the City', if it were set in a small city in Morocco. I'd update that to being more of an incredibly diverse (in gender, sexual orientation and nationality) Moroccan version of 'Sex and The City.' This ambitiously-detailed (417 pages) story centers primarily on a small group of American and French twenty-something singles teaching in Äin El Qamar, at a government school presided over by a dishonest, overbearing tyrant of an administrator. The teachers, a few of whom took the foreign assignment in order to forget past lovers, cope with less-than-luxurious living conditions, while trying to assimilate into a culture that seems very strange, judgmental and often unfriendly to them. There's Janna, a second year teacher who is still obsessed with a young Moroccan she had an affair with the first year, but seems to have moved on. Kevin is a gay man who is trying to forget the tragic loss of his lover, who shares a modest home with Dave, another gay teacher who left an incompatibly closeted lover and is developing a crush on one of his seemingly straight students. Marcie left the USA behind for the exotic charm of Morocco, and quickly falls love with a local who is known as a shallow playboy. Last but not least, we have Claudette, a slightly older French veteran who functions as a social director for her fellow teachers, when she is not entertaining local gentlemen callers who are likely just after her money. Other supporting characters include a man who has returned to teach in his hometown, a Frenchman who is the life of any party but always seems to go home alone, a French married couple with an apparent 'open' relationship, a hunky tennis pro whom Claudette is infatuated with, and a young Moroccan student who stalks one of the American teachers. It's a very well-written and entertaining book, which I initially thought was a bit overly long and detailed, but I now see that this is part of its charm, in that it engrosses you totally in the lives of these individuals. At its very core, it is a story about looking for happiness and love, and of learning to be open-minded enough in order to achieve those goals. I give it five stars out of five.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2007

    Riveting literature

    In Moroccan Roll, Author Steven Stanley delicately describes life in 1970s Morocco, seen through the eyes of several diverse school teachers. As we fall in love with each of the characters, Stanley also brilliantly teaches us about the cultures in Morocco. The last 200 pages are particularly fascinating and unexpected. Stanley's inspiring tale teaches us that although life may not turn out the way we expect, it really is about what we make it. We're looking forward to Stanley's next novel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2007

    A reviewer

    Frothy, intelligent, satirical, lyrical,diabolicial, and tragically and hillariously comedic gay lit/chic lit book brings to mind Armistead Maupin's tales of 1970's San Francisco. Steven Stanley successfully evokes a very specific time and place (1970's Morocco) and interweaves multiple storylines. This book is recommended for all, especially those that are looking for an engrossing book to read on a lazy afternoon.

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