Mortalis (DemonWars Series #4)

( 26 )

Overview

The long struggle is over at last. The demon dactyl is no more, its dark sorceries shattered by the gemstone magic wielded by the woman known as Pony. But victory did not come easily. Many lives were lost, including Pony’s lover, the elf-trained ranger Elbryan Wynden.

Despite the dactyl’s demise, the kingdom still seethes in the same cauldron of plots and machinations. But when a deadly sickness suddenly appears among the people of Corona, Pony must undertake a pilgrimage that ...

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Overview

The long struggle is over at last. The demon dactyl is no more, its dark sorceries shattered by the gemstone magic wielded by the woman known as Pony. But victory did not come easily. Many lives were lost, including Pony’s lover, the elf-trained ranger Elbryan Wynden.

Despite the dactyl’s demise, the kingdom still seethes in the same cauldron of plots and machinations. But when a deadly sickness suddenly appears among the people of Corona, Pony must undertake a pilgrimage that will test her powers–and her faith–as never before. Watching her every step of the way is the man she hates above all else: Marcalo De’Unnero, the villain responsible for Elbryan’s death . . . who would desire nothing more than to lead Pony down that same treacherous path to destruction.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
MORTALIS IS SALVATORE AT HIS BEST–AND EVEN BETTER.”
–MICHAEL A. STACKPOLE
New York Times bestselling author

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This hefty fantasy by bestselling author Salvatore (The Witch's Daughter), which launches a new Demon Wars saga, finds the beautiful and powerful gemstone-mage, Pony, grieving for her lost husband, Elbryan. She also faces a major decision: to become mother abbess of the Abellican Church, or to accept King Danube's offer to make her a baroness and secular ruler? Pony agonizes over whether to stand with the church and fight its corruption or to help the king restore order to a shattered kingdom; she opts to travel to her homeland to ponder. Thus, with no demons to kill, the saga starts off detailing the power struggle between church and state. There is a new enemy to defeat in the land of Corona, however--a goblin-spread plague that is the deadly legacy of Bestesbulzibar, the evil "demon dactyl" who has already been killed off three times (once in each volume of the first Demon Wars trilogy). Filled with far more angst than action, this volume still contains enough adventure (including, finally, a magical battle against a tigerish monster) to keep it moving at a happy pace. But for fans looking to vicariously shed the blood of evil goblins, fomorians (giants) and powries (dwarves), this may not be enough. And readers with a more mature perspective might find greater enjoyment and similar conflicts in any well-written medieval history. 6-city author tour. (July) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Library Journal
Grieving for her husband, killed in a heroic effort to slay the demon dactyl that threatened the land of Corona, Jilsepone Wyndon rejects offers of worldly and religious power and flees to her childhood home in search of solitude. Instead, she finds a new enemy to fight--a plague of such deadly proportions that not even the efforts of the most potent magic can touch it. Continuing the saga begun in his "Demon Wars" trilogy, Salvatore depicts the deceptive aftermath of war and the elusive attempt to restore a battered land to some semblance of peace. The author's skill at creating a richly complex world peopled with well-rounded characters makes this a good selection for most libraries. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
School Library Journal
This hefty fantasy by bestselling author Salvatore (The Witch's Daughter), which launches a new Demon Wars saga, finds the beautiful and powerful gemstone-mage, Pony, grieving for her lost husband, Elbryan. She also faces a major decision: to become mother abbess of the Abellican Church, or to accept King Danube's offer to make her a baroness and secular ruler? Pony agonizes over whether to stand with the church and fight its corruption or to help the king restore order to a shattered kingdom; she opts to travel to her homeland to ponder. Thus, with no demons to kill, the saga starts off detailing the power struggle between church and state. There is a new enemy to defeat in the land of Corona, however--a goblin-spread plague that is the deadly legacy of Bestesbulzibar, the evil "demon dactyl" who has already been killed off three times (once in each volume of the first Demon Wars trilogy). Filled with far more angst than action, this volume still contains enough adventure (including, finally, a magical battle against a tigerish monster) to keep it moving at a happy pace. But for fans looking to vicariously shed the blood of evil goblins, fomorians (giants) and powries (dwarves), this may not be enough. And readers with a more mature perspective might find greater enjoyment and similar conflicts in any well-written medieval history. 6-city author tour. (July) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Kirkus Reviews
First volume in a new DemonWars series (The Demon Apostle, 1999, etc.). In the previous struggle, ranger Elbryan was killed, but his wife Pony, more properly known as Jilseponie, a mage powered by gemstone-magic, survives, as do Bradwarden the centaur, the wise old elf Juraviel, etc. Even though the demon dactyl is dead, problems remain: goblin armies, some starving, some diseased, swarm over the land; a bunch of rebellious Abellicans, monks also powered by gemstone-magic, are stirring up trouble; and the rosy plague, spread by goblins, is taking its toll. All this means sleepless nights for King Danube, whose growing love for Pony will stir up courtly intrigues and jealousies. In sum: the recipe as before, this time without innovation. Fans only. (Author tour)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345430427
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 4/3/2001
  • Series: DemonWars Series , #4
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 576
  • Sales rank: 337,003
  • Product dimensions: 6.88 (w) x 4.18 (h) x 1.28 (d)

Meet the Author

R.A. Salvatore

R. A. Salvatore was born in Massachusetts in 1959. He is the acclaimed author of the DemonWars trilogy: The Demon Awakens, The Demon Spirit, and The Demon Apostle, as well as The Bastion of Darkness and the New York Times bestseller Star Wars® The New Jedi Order: Vector Prime. He lives in Massachusetts with his wife, Diane, and their three children.

Good To Know

Well, I just turned 50, but I'm still a clean-up hitter on the softball field. A couple of years ago, I found myself in horrible shape and feeling lousy all the time, and so, with the help of my wonderful and beautiful wife of 25 years, I started taking my health seriously again. Now I feel better than I did when I was 40. Fit Camp three times a week and yoga and softball and all the rest.

The other thing that I've come to learn about myself is that R. A. Salvatore and Bobby Salvatore are two different people (and I much prefer Bobby, thank you very much). It's not that I lie to readers at book signings, or anything like that, it's just that the things that are important to me are the little things in life: my family, my home. Writing is what I do, but it's not who I am. I remember one time about 20 years ago, I went back to where I had worked to see my brother, who still worked there. Gary was a few years older, and was, of course, my hero. An associate found us in the parking lot and nudged my brother, asking him what it felt like to have a younger brother who was so much more successful than he.

Gary, of course, took it all in stride, turning what might have been an awkward moment into a joke. Gary died a few years later and I'll never forget the lines of mourners -- grown men crying like babies. He was such a big part of the community, as a friend and a coach to so many kids over the years.

That brought me back to the parking lot and the awkward moment, and the truth of it all: I was not and have never been more successful than my brother, and nothing I can do as a writer will get me there. Only the things I do as a human being, a father, a neighbor, a friend, can bring me into his league.
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Read an Excerpt

Prologue

Jilseponie—Pony—sat on the crenellated roof of the one squat tower of St. Precious Abbey in the great city of Palmaris, looking out over the snow-covered rooftops, her gaze drifting inevitably to the dark flowing waters of the Masur Delaval. A bitterly cold wind nipped at her, but Pony, deep in memories, hardly noticed the sting. All the region, the northwestern expanses of the kingdom of Honce-the-Bear, had experienced an early snow only a week before, winter coming on in full force, though the year had not seen the end of the tenth month.

By all estimations, the war against the demon Bestesbulzibar and its goblin, giant, and powrie minions had gone unexpectedly well, had been completed with minimal loss of human life and without a single major city burned to the ground. Now with winter, though, the aftereffects of that war were beginning to show, most notably the food shortages in villages whose supplies had been diverted to towns that had harbored the King’s soldiers. Rumors had come to Palmaris of uprisings in some of those villages against King Danube and against the Abellican Church, whose leader had surely acted in the interests of the demon. Other rumors spoke of several mysterious deaths along the coast of the Mantis Arm and of a group of fanatics threatening to break away from the Abellican Church while rejecting outright the notion of any church dedicated to Avelyn Desbris.

So the war had ended here in Palmaris, but it seemed to the grieving Pony as if the turmoil had only begun.

Or was it merely a continuing thing? she wondered. Was such travesty and turmoil, such unrest, merely a reflection of the human condition, an unending procession of one battle after another, of one cause of bitterness replacing another? The notion stung Pony deeply, for if that were the case, then what had they really accomplished? What had been bought by their sacrifice?

Why had Elbryan, her beloved husband, died?

Pony gave a helpless sigh at the futility of it all. She thought back to her early days, up in the wild Timberlands, in Dundalis, when she and Elbryan had grown up together, carefree. She remembered running down the wooded trails beside the boy, running particularly among the white caribou moss in the pine-filled valley north of their village. She remembered climbing the northern slope beside him one chilly night, looking up at the sky to see Corona’s Halo, the beautiful multicolored ring that encircled the world, the source, she had later come to learn, of the blessed magical gemstones that served as the power and focus of faith of the Abellican Church.

The next dawn, Pony and Elbryan had witnessed the return of their fathers and the other hunters. How clearly Pony now remembered that, running, full of excitement, full of anticipation, full of—

Horror. For suspended from a shoulder pole had hung a most curious and ugly little creature: a goblin. Never could Pony or Elbryan have foreseen that slain little brute as a harbinger of such doom. But soon after, the goblins had attacked in force, burning Dundalis to the ground, slaughtering everyone except Pony and Elbryan, the two of them somehow managing separately to elude the monsters, each not knowing that the other had survived.

And afterward Pony had wound up here, in Palmaris, bereft of memory and identity, adopted by Graevis and Pettibwa Chilichunk, patrons of the bustling tavern Fellowship Way.

Pony looked out across the quiet city now, in the direction where that establishment had stood. What wild turns fate had placed in her path: married to the favored nephew of the city’s Baron Bildeborough; the wedding annulled forthwith and Pony indentured in the King’s army; her ascension to the elite Coastpoint Guard and her appointment to Pireth Tulme; the coming of the powries and the fall of that fortress. It had all taken years, but to Pony now it seemed as if it had happened overnight. She could again feel the chill deep in her bones as she had escaped doomed Pireth Tulme, floating in the cold waters of the Gulf of Corona. Perhaps it was fate, perhaps mere chance, that had pulled her from those waters in the vicinity of Avelyn Desbris, the “mad friar” from St.-Mere-Abelle who was being hunted by the Church for the death of a master and the theft of many of the sacred magical gemstones. Avelyn had taken Pony back to Dundalis, and there she had been reunited with Elbryan, who had returned to the region after being trained as a ranger by the mysterious Touel’alfar.

What a dark road the three had walked from there: to Aida and the demon dactyl; back across the kingdom to St.-Mere-Abelle, where Pony’s adoptive parents had been imprisoned and had died; and then back again—a road that should have lightened, despite the grief, but that had only darkened more as the evil that was Bestesbulzibar, the demon dactyl, infected Father Ab- bot Markwart with a singular desire to do battle with Elbryan and Pony.

And so he had, in that same mansion where Pony had spent her wedding night with Connor Bildeborough, the mansion of horrors where Elbryan and Pony had waged the final fight against Markwart, and had won, though at the price of Elbryan’s life.

Now Pony wasn’t sure what they had won and what it had been worth. She recognized the almost circular nature of her long journey; but instead of drawing comfort from that, she felt restless and trapped.

“It is far too cold for you to be up here, I fear,” came a gentle voice behind her, the voice of Brother Braumin Herde, the leader of the band of monks who had followed Master Jojonah away from the Church, believing as they did in Avelyn’s goodness, one of the monks who had come to join Elbryan and Pony in their efforts against Markwart.

She turned to regard the handsome man. He was older than Pony by several years—in his early thirties—with black, woolly hair just starting to gray and a dark complexion made even more so by the fact that no matter how often he shaved his face, it was always shadowed by black hair.

“It is too unimportant for me to care,” she answered quietly. Pony looked back over the city as he walked up to lean on the wall beside her.

“Thinking of Elbryan?” he asked.

Pony smiled briefly, believing the answer to be obvious.

“Many are saddened,” Brother Braumin began—the same hollow words Pony had been hearing from so many for the last three months. She appreciated their efforts—of course she did!—but, in truth, she wished they would all leave her to her thoughts in private.

“The passage of time will heal . . .” Brother Braumin started to say, but when Pony fixed him with a skeptical glance, he let his words die away.

“Your pain is to be expected,” he tried again a moment later. “You must take solace and faith in God and in the good that came of your actions.”

Now Pony glared sternly at him, and the gentle monk retreated a step.

“Good?” she asked.

Braumin held up his hands as if he did not understand.

“They are fighting again, aren’t they?” Pony asked, looking back over the snowy city. “Or should I say that they are fighting still?”

“They?”

“The leaders of your Church,” Pony clarified, “and King Danube and his advisers. Fighting again, fighting always. It changes not at all.”

“If the Church is in turmoil, that is understandable, you must admit,” Braumin returned firmly. “We have lost our Father Abbot.”

“You lost him long before I killed him,” Pony interjected.

“True enough,” the monk admitted. “But still it came as a shock to so many who supported Dalebert Markwart to learn the truth: to learn that Bestesbulzibar—curse his name, the ultimate darkness—had so infiltrated our ranks as to pervert the Father Abbot himself.”

“And now he is gone and you are better off,” Pony remarked.

Brother Braumin didn’t immediately respond, and Pony understood that she wasn’t being fair to him. He was a friend, after all, who had done nothing but try to help her and Elbryan, and her sarcasm was certainly wounding him. She looked at him directly and started to say something but bit it back immediately. So be it, she decided, for she could not find generosity in her heart. Not yet.

“We are better off by far,” Braumin decided, turning the sarcasm back. “And better off we would be by far if Jilseponie would reconsider the offer.”

Pony was shaking her head before he completed the all-too-predictable request. Reconsider the offer. Always that. They wanted her to become the mother abbess of the Abellican Church, though nothing of the sort had ever been heard of in the long history of the patriarchal order. Brother Francis, Markwart’s staunchest follower, had suggested it, even while holding the dying Markwart in his arms, the demon burned from the Father Abbot’s body by the faith and strength of Pony and Elbryan. Francis had seen the truth during that terrible battle, and the truth of his terrible master. Pony had killed the demon that Markwart had become, and now several very influential monks were hinting that they wanted Pony to replace him.

Some of them were, at least. Pony didn’t delude herself into thinking that such a break with tradition as appointing a woman to head the Church—and a woman who had just killed the previous leader!—would be without its vehement opponents. The battles would be endless, and, to Pony’s way of thinking, perfectly pointless.

If that wasn’t complicated enough, another offer had come to her, one from King Danube himself, offering to name her Baroness of Palmaris, though she obviously had no qualifications for the position either, other than her newfound heroic reputation. Pony wasn’t blind to the reality of it: in the aftermath of the war both Church and Crown were jockeying for power. Whichever side could claim Jilseponie, companion of Elbryan the Nightbird, as friend, could claim to have promoted her to a position of power, would gain much in the battle for the hearts and loyalty of the common folk of Palmaris and the surrounding region.

Pony began to laugh quietly as she looked away from Brother Braumin, out over the snow-blanketed city. She loved the snow, especially when it fell deep from blustery skies, draping walls of white over the sides of buildings. Far from a hardship such weather seemed to Pony. Rather, she considered it a reprieve, an excuse to sit quietly by a blazing fire, accountable to no one and without responsibility. Also, because of the unexpectedly early storm, King Danube had been forced to delay his return to Ursal. If the weather did not cooperate, the king might have to wait out the winter in Palmaris, which took some of the pressure off Pony to either accept or reject his offer of the barony.

Though the weather had cooperated, Pony felt little reprieve. Once she had called this city home. But now, with so much pain associated with the place—the ruins of Fellowship Way, the loss of her adoptive family and her beloved Elbryan—no longer could she see any goodness here or recall any warm memories.

“If he retains the barony, Duke Kalas will battle St. Precious in every policy,” Brother Braumin remarked, drawing Pony from her thoughts. But only temporarily, for the mere mention of the forceful Duke, the temporary Baron of Palmaris, inevitably led her to consider the man’s residence, the very house in which her marriage to Connor Bildeborough had swiftly descended into chaos, the house wherein Markwart had taken Elbryan from her forever.

“How will we win those battles without heroic Jilseponie leading us?” Braumin dared ask. He draped his arm about Pony’s shoulders, and that brought, at last, a genuine smile to the woman’s beautiful face. “Or perhaps Jilseponie could take the King’s offer instead. . . .”

“Am I to be a figurehead, then?” she asked. “For you or for the Crown? A symbol that will allow Braumin and his friends to attain that which they desire?”

“Never that!” the monk replied, feigning horror; for it was obvious that he understood Pony was teasing him.

“I told Bradwarden and Roger Lockless that I would join them up in Dundalis,” Pony remarked; and, indeed, as she said it, she was thinking that traveling back to her first home might not be such a bad thing. Elbryan was buried up there, where it was . . . cleaner. Yes, that was a good word to describe it, Pony decided. Cleaner. More removed from the dirt of humankind’s endless bickering. Of course, she, too, was trapped here, and likely for the entire winter, for the road north was not an easy one this season.

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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

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( 26 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2014

    Amazing

    Bob's best book. Hands down. Read this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2002

    Salvatore is a modern fantasy master.....

    R. A. Salvatore proves what a multi-talented author he is with Mortalis. Salvatore is already famous for being able to choreograph dazzling fight scenes. In this book, he brings another talent to the forefront...............the ability to invoke some of the deepest layers of human emotion; whether it is despair, longing, corruption, greed, fear. There are a wide variety of characters in this novel; all of who really bring you into the story and make you feel what they are feeling. This book is definitely his best work. When I was almost halfway through the book I stayed up all night to finish it. I kept telling myself I would put it down after each chapter, but after each one, I had to keep reading more. The first three books were very good fantasy reads, but Mortalis really surpasses them and pulls all of the events that happen in the previous three together. I would have to say that I probably like the first three even better, after having read Mortalis. Whether you are a die-hard Drizzt fan, or a new reader to Salvatore, this book and this series will not disappoint you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2001

    Make sure to read the poem 'Mortalis' in the book!!

    I would like to say that I really enjoyed reading this book, but even more so, that is one of the best poems that I have ever read. I write a lot of poetry, and it runs along the same style as what I compose. Make sure that do not miss the poem in the middle, from which the novel takes its name.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2001

    The Problem with Reviewers

    Now, the under lying problem with reviewers is that they sometimes review so many books that they lose sight of the true reason to read. For enjoyment. While Mortalis was a touch slow at times, the momentum was constantly building. This is truly a book for his fans, for those among you who still care that authors take into effect that detail and characterization are very valid goals to strive for. This is the beginning to a new chapter in the tale of this land. Treat the introduction as such, and please, let there be no whining from the masses.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2000

    Far exceeded my expectations

    'The Demon Awakens' was an absolute knockout. However when I continued with the series I was quite disappointed. I did not enjoy the second two books. And it was not because Nightbird died, that was ok. I was just disappointed in the overall story. So when I picked up Mortalis, I was not overly excited, it was just my partiality to Bob that made me read it. And glad I am that I did. Mortalis was great. Bob picked up the story very well. It has much more intensity in the way of personal problems between characters, which brings about more intrigue and less action. Mortalis shows many true examples of a hero. Examples that focus on characters who are not people of battle. Although Mortalis has many of the same themes as the other books in the series, they are much stronger here. So much so that I found myself more in touch even with the small characters in this book, than the main characters in the others, even Nightbird. My only criticism would be that I am just sick and tired of De'Unnero. If he was not in this book, I think I would have liked it even better. De'Unnero cannot compare to Entreri in any way. Mortalis is different than any other of Bob's books, and I think it is his best yet. He has restored my faith in the world of Corona.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2000

    Not your average fantasy book

    After reading the Demon Wars Series' first 3 books I didn't know if it could get any better but oh it could and it did. In Mortalis the fight is not against any demon or horde of goblins but against something even more terrifying that threatens the future of every race. Though there isn't as much swordplay or magic use as Mortalis' predecessors, the anticipation and excitement as you turn the page are by no means less. R.A. Salvatore brings himself to an even higher level with this book and the next books in this series will undoubtedly prove to be as well written. Anyone who has not bought this book, what are you waiting for?

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