Mortality in Traditional Chinese Thought

Overview

Mortality in Traditional Chinese Thought is the definitive exploration of a complex and fascinating but little-understood subject. Arguably, death as a concept has not been nearly as central a preoccupation in Chinese culture as it has been in the West. However, even in a society that seems to understand death as a part of life, responses to mortality are revealing and indicate much about what is valued and what is feared. This edited volume fills the lacuna on this subject, presenting an array of philosophical, ...
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Overview

Mortality in Traditional Chinese Thought is the definitive exploration of a complex and fascinating but little-understood subject. Arguably, death as a concept has not been nearly as central a preoccupation in Chinese culture as it has been in the West. However, even in a society that seems to understand death as a part of life, responses to mortality are revealing and indicate much about what is valued and what is feared. This edited volume fills the lacuna on this subject, presenting an array of philosophical, artistic, historical, and religious perspectives on death during a variety of historical periods. Contributors look at material culture, including findings now available from the Mawangdui tomb excavations; consider death in Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist traditions; and discuss death and the history and philosophy of war.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“…the volume provides a provocative and multifaceted entry into the study of mortality in traditional Chinese thought … [it] demonstrates the richness of Chinese responses to mortality, inviting scholars to extend the scope of related scholarship beyond what is contained within its pages.” — Mortality

“…critical considerations … do not remotely eclipse the great academic value of this edited book which will, no doubt, very soon become an essential work of reference for all those who are interested in the study of death in Chinese civilization.” — Journal of Chinese Religions

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Amy Olberding is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Oklahoma.

Philip J. Ivanhoe is Reader-Professor of Philosophy at the City University of Hong Kong. His many books include Religious and Philosophical Aspects of the Laozi (coedited with Mark Csikszentmihalyi) and Essays on Skepticism, Relativism, and Ethics in the Zhuangzi (coedited with Paul Kjellberg), both also published by SUNY Press.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction 1

Chapter 1 Preparation for the Afterlife in Ancient China Mu-chou Poo 13

Chapter 2 Ascend to Heaven or Stay in the Tomb? Paintings in Mawangdui Tomb 1 and the Virtual Ritual of Revival in Second-Century B.C.E. China Eugene Y. Wang 37

Chapter 3 Concepts of Death and the Afterlife Reflected in Newly Discovered Tomb Objects and Texts from Han China Jue Guo 85

Chapter 4 War, Death, and Ancient Chinese Cosmology: Thinking through the Thickness of Culture Roger T. Ames 117

Chapter 5 Death and Dying in the Analects Philip J. Ivanhoe 137

Chapter 6 I Know Not "Seems": Grief for Parents in the Analects Amy Olberding 153

Chapter 7 Allotment and Death in Early China Mark Csikszentmihalyi 177

Chapter 8 Death in the Zhuangzi: Mind, Nature, and the Art of Forgetting Mark Berkson 191

Chapter 9 Sages, the Past, and the Dead: Death in the Huainanzi Michael Puett 225

Chapter 10 Linji and William James on Mortality: Two Visions of Pragmatism Tao Jiang 249

Chapter 11 Death as the Ultimate Concern in the Neo-Confucian Tradition: Wang Yangming's Followers as an Example Guoxiang Peng 271

List of Contributors 297

Index 301

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