Moses Goes to a Concert

( 2 )

Overview

Moses and his school friends are deaf, but like most children, they have a lot to say. They communicate in American Sigh Language, using visual signs and facial expressions. This is called signing. And even though they can't hear, they can enjoy many activities through their other senses. Today, Moses and his classmates are going to a concert. Their teacher, Mr. Samuels, has two surprises in store for them, to make this particular concert a special event.

Isaac Millman tells ...

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Overview

Moses and his school friends are deaf, but like most children, they have a lot to say. They communicate in American Sigh Language, using visual signs and facial expressions. This is called signing. And even though they can't hear, they can enjoy many activities through their other senses. Today, Moses and his classmates are going to a concert. Their teacher, Mr. Samuels, has two surprises in store for them, to make this particular concert a special event.

Isaac Millman tells Moses's story in pictures and written English, and in American Sign Language (ASL), introducing hearing children to the signs for some of the key words and ideas. At the end of the book are two full conversations in sign language and a page showing the hand alphabet.

You can learn sign language, too.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"[An] upbeat story." - School Library Journal

"Millman's story, illustrated in delicate watercolors, ought to pop open a few young eyes (and perhaps some adult eyes as well) . . . The power of Millman's book comes from the simple fact that he levels the playing field; of course deaf children go to concerts, but conveying how they enjoy music removes yet one more barrier between those who can hear and those who cannot." - Kirkus Reviews

"Works so well that you wonder why there aren't lots more books like it . . . Deaf children will welcome this joyful story that talks, without condescension, about the fun they have. Hearing kids, too, will want to learn some of the sign language, and with the help of an adult, they can practice the hand alphabet shown at the back of the book." - Starred, Booklist

"Moses is deaf. . .When he goes with his deaf classmates to a concert, they hold balloons in their laps to feel the vibrations. The percussionist in the orchestra is also deaf...and after her wild, wonderful performance, she meets the deaf children, tells them her story (in ASL), and then allows them to try out all her instruments. . .[A] breakthrough picture book." —Starred, Booklist

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The seemingly incongruous premise of this harmonious debuta class of deaf children attends an orchestral concertleads to a revelation for readers who may well have assumed that the ability to hear is a prerequisite for enjoying music. Holding balloons that their teacher passes out to help them "feel the music," Moses and his classmates are thrilled to pick up the vibrations. Afterward, they visit with the orchestra's deaf percussionist, who, intriguingly, performs in stocking feet so she, too, can feel the beat. She lets the students play her instruments and, using American Sign Language (precisely illustrated in easy-to-read diagrams), explains how she worked hard to achieve her career goal. Back home, Moses tells his parents about his day, signing a message of universal value: "When you set your mind to it, you can become anything you want." An introductory note explains how to interpret the sign-language diagrams, which are integrated throughout the clear and colorful illustrations. Fiction and instruction make beautiful music together on these cheerful pages. Ages 5-up. (Apr.)
Children's Literature - Wendy Keen
Moses is going on a school trip to a young people's concert. The percussionist playing with the orchestra is a friend of Moses' teacher. Much to the surprise of Moses and his classmates, the percussionist is deaf-just as they are. Moses realizes that if he sets his mind to it, he can be anything he wants when he grows up-doctor, electrician or percussionist. Teachers would do well to include this picture book in their class library. Accompanying the text are some American Sign Language (ASL) translations for key words. Not only is the book a useful reminder of individual capabilities, but it also serves an introduction to the role of an orchestra's percussionist.
Children's Literature - Jan Lieberman
Deaf people hear music by feeling the vibrations. You will discover that some have become expert percussionists. The class is attending a concert at which a deaf percussionist is soloing. She plays in her stocking feet to feel the vibrations of the instruments. The conductor signals her when she must move from one instrument to another. Each page has insets of Moses signing to his friends including the word and the sign. No disability can prevent a person from enjoying, playing and responding to music. Children can play drums, rhythm stick, and bells to recorded music, but let them play in their stockings!
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2A group of deaf children is taken to a concert where the youngsters meet the percussionist, a friend of their teacher, and learn to their surprise that she is also deaf. She explains to Moses and his class how she became a percussionist even though she had lost her hearing and helps them understand that anything is possible with hard work and determination. She lets the children play on her instruments and feel the vibrations on balloons that their teacher has given them. Cheerful watercolor illustrations show the multiethnic children enjoying themselves at the concert, while smaller cartoon strips feature Moses's additional comments in sign language. A page displaying the manual alphabet and a conversation in sign language in which Moses tells his parents about his day enhance the upbeat story.Sally R. Dow, Ossining Public Library, NY
Kirkus Reviews
Millman's story, illustrated in delicate watercolors, ought to pop open a few young eyes (and perhaps some adult eyes as well). Moses and his school chums, all deaf, are off to a young people's concert. They take their seats up front, where a row of percussion instruments is arrayed between them and the orchestra. When the percussionist appears, she is in her stocking feet; she is deaf, and will feel the music through the floor. Moses's teacher hands out balloons that they will hold in their laps and that will help them feel the music. After the concert the percussionist, using sign language, gives the students a little inspirational talk, which Moses delivers to his parents later that evening. The power of Millman's book comes from the simple fact that he levels the playing field; of course deaf children go to concerts, but conveying how they enjoy music removes yet one more barrier between those who can hear and those who cannot. Moses also appears in inset boxes, signing comments aimed at readers and encouraging them to attempt signs. A few spreads are given over entirely to signed conversations, with effectively diagrammed hand movements and facial expressions. The final page illustrates the signed letters of the alphabet. (Picture book. 5- 9)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780374453664
  • Publisher: Square Fish
  • Publication date: 4/1/2002
  • Series: Moses Goes to Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 192,913
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.48 (w) x 10.67 (h) x 0.13 (d)

Meet the Author

Isaac Millman also wrote and illustrated Moses Goes to School, a Junior Library Guild Selection. He lives in New York City.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 6, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Very pleased!

    I received this book in plenty of time for Christmas. My daughter, who teaches preschool deaf children, was delighted to receive it and can't wait to read it to her class.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2006

    wonderful book

    This is a wonderful book for both deaf and hearing children. It is well written and clearly shows the author did some research. Moses is a delightful child who goes to a music concert with his class and meets a concert performer, also deaf. The story is meaningful and gives the wonderful opportunity to teach some sign language from the clearly illustrated pictures. The cultural lesson is quite effective.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

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