The Most Dangerous Game

The Most Dangerous Game

4.5 66
by Richard Connell
     
 

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Do your students enjoy a good laugh? Do they like to be scared? Or do they just like a book with a happy ending? No matter what their taste, our Creative Short Stories series has the answer.

We've taken some of the world's best stories from dark, musty anthologies and brought them into the light, giving them the individual attention they deserve. Each book in the

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Overview

Do your students enjoy a good laugh? Do they like to be scared? Or do they just like a book with a happy ending? No matter what their taste, our Creative Short Stories series has the answer.

We've taken some of the world's best stories from dark, musty anthologies and brought them into the light, giving them the individual attention they deserve. Each book in the series has been designed with today's young reader in mind. As the words come to life, students will develop a lasting appreciation for great literature.

The humor of Mark Twain...the suspense of Edgar Allan Poe...the danger of Jack London...the sensitivity of Katherine Mansfield. Creative Short Stories has it all and will prove to be a welcome addition to any library.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Cynthia Winfield
This newly-expanded "Creative Short Stories" series includes sixteen classic short story titles often encountered in junior high curricula, each presented in individual hardcover books with period artwork and photographs. The large pages and double-spaced type make the text reader-friendly, although the font appears to be a standard 12-point type. Curiously the publisher chose to print most of the text in black but a few scattered lines on each page appear in shades of blue, green, red, or orange; this reader can neither discern a pattern to the colored text nor posit a rationale for why certain sentences were chosen over others for the colored type. Some colored lines seem pivotal to the stories while others do not. Each story is followed by a brief literary essay commenting on some aspect of the text and including quotes from the story (the lines for some of which are printed in color). The essay is followed by a biographical piece about the author. Illustrations complement the text and provide footholds for cross-curricular discussions. To a classroom teacher with a limited budget, purchasing class sets of any of the individual stories would seem extravagant; however, the hardcover presentation might make the text more enticing for reluctant readers and a few copies of a title could support small reading groups. The books are beautifully done and their unusual presentation could make them preferable for student readers over the tightly-packed text found in many standard short story anthologies. For schools, libraries, or parents with ample budgets, having these sixteen titles on the shelf would be an asset. Reviewer: Cynthia Winfield
Children's Literature - Amanda Ledbetter
Aboard a yacht crossing the Caribbean Sea late one night, Sanger Rainsford and his companion Whitney are discussing big game hunting and how the hunter and the hunted would vary in their viewpoints. When he is left alone on the deck, Rainsford hears gunfire in the distance and stumbles overboard in his attempt to spot the origin. His survival instincts kick in, and he manages to swim to a nearby island, the likely source of the gunshots. There, Rainsford meets General Zaroff, a fellow hunter whose quest to find a quarry worthy of his talents has lead him to hunting men instead of beast. Appalled by this revelation, Rainsford soon finds himself running for his life from this madman. This classic short story is one of twelve in the "Creative Short Story" series. Its fast-paced plot draws readers into Rainsford's world and keeps their attention riveted through its final words. The premise of this story provides great opportunity for reflection and debate, as the main character's opinion of hunting evolves through his personal experience. This particular printing includes sentences set apart by a different colored font, and though it may be designed to aid in story discussion, no key or directions are provided to help the reader understand its purpose, making it a distraction. This book also includes "a closer look" story analysis and a four-page author biography. Reviewer: Amanda Ledbetter
Amazon.com - Landon Reed
This is a classic short story about hunting the ultimate game. We've probably all read this in high school and it stills works as a story. The bonus teaser story for the author's coming sequel picks up at the end of Connell's story without any hiccups, very important if you are trying to follow an original act. I got some good chuckles out of the author's words. The guy has the guts to write that the story basically didn't wow him and STILL he wanted to do more with it. I've read his other compa

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781583419205
Publisher:
Creative Company, The
Publication date:
09/28/2010
Series:
Creative Short Stories Series
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
7.10(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author

Richard Edward Connell Jr. (1893-1949) was an American author and journalist probably best remembered for his short story "The Most Dangerous Game." Connell was one of the most popular American short story writers of his time, and his stories appeared in the Saturday Evening Post and Collier's Weekly. He had equal success as a journalist and screenwriter, and was nominated for an Academy Award in 1942 for best original story for the film Meet John Doe.

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The Most Dangerous Game: Richard Connell's Original Masterpiece 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 66 reviews.
milesmorris More than 1 year ago
The Most Dangerous Game has been around a long while and has been redone in one way or another in books, plays, or movies for years. But, none compare to the original. I think I'm in agreement with the story editor about the ending. I recall thinking it was clever the first time I read it, but it really is too abrupt. The newly added content at the conclusion of original story is promising and seamless.
Guest More than 1 year ago
good book, i read it in 7th grade about 1 week ago.
Anonymous 7 months ago
It's a short story, but it's thrilled entertainment.
Anonymous 11 months ago
You should really read this book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The words are just white blanks
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The most dsngerous game is about a guy named rainford and he heres mulitypul gun shots. So when he falls over brode and he heres gun shots again and a again. So he clams himself down and starts swimming towrds the islaind. When he done swimming he finds himself on ship trap island. Buy the book and see if he survies the game. This book gave the girl who wrote the hungre games the idea.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had to read this in my honors language arts class. It was a good book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great story with many twists and turns. I would reccomend it to anyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Although the ending is a little abrupt, I have enjoyed this story since seventh grade. The tricks that Rainsford adapts are similar to the technical jargon I read in Star Wars books that sometimes makes only a little sense, but adds flavor to the book, like a certain spice or taste of culture and background.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
But isnt it just like 30 pages
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Ashley Bonesio More than 1 year ago
I read it for my freshmen high school year and when we read the first sentance, i was hooked. I recommend this book to amyone and everyone of all ages!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Shivawn Garner More than 1 year ago
I read this back in school, over 20 years ago, and it has stuck with me all of these years. Although it is a quick read, its ability to captivate and entertain should not be underestimated.
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