Mother and Daughter Jewish Cooking: Two Generations of Jewish Women Share Traditional and Contemporary Recipes

Mother and Daughter Jewish Cooking: Two Generations of Jewish Women Share Traditional and Contemporary Recipes

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by Evelyn Rose, Lisa Koenig, Judi Rose
     
 

"In this book we are seeking the best of both worlds—the remembrance of tastes past and the thrill of the new. What matters in this updating of the classics and the culling of new ideas from communities around us is that we adapt and integrate them in the spirit of Jewish history, making them our own as our ancestors have always done. In doing

Overview

"In this book we are seeking the best of both worlds—the remembrance of tastes past and the thrill of the new. What matters in this updating of the classics and the culling of new ideas from communities around us is that we adapt and integrate them in the spirit of Jewish history, making them our own as our ancestors have always done. In doing so we continue a tradition that began more than five thousand years ago."
—from the Introduction

Two generations of Jewish women, mother and daughter, have come together to create this wonderful collection of recipes for cooks young and old. The mother, Evelyn Rose, offers traditional Jewish recipes, just the way your mother and grandmother used to make them. For more contemporary, bolder, and lighter tastes, her daughter, Judi, offers updated and all-new dishes.

For example, the chapters on soups, starters, and salads include a recipe for traditional Chopped Liver (though it's made with less fat), as well as Chicken Liver Pate with Pears and a Citrus and Red Currant Sauce, a totally contemporary hors d'oeuvre made with a fruit citrus-scented sauce. Try the beautiful, ruby-colored Traditional Beet Borscht for that old-world taste, or you might enjoy the satisfying and sophisticated Cream of Watercress Soup with a Toasted Walnut Garnish, which can be served hot or chilled.

For the Kosher home, there are plenty of recipes for dairy meals, such as a traditional Onion Tarte from Alsace, or the exquisite and aromatic Provençal Sun-dried Tomato, Olive, and Basil Tarte. Many of the pasta dishes can be adapted to dairy or meat meals, such as Auntie Mary's Savory Noodles and Noodles in Sesame Sauce, Hong Kong Style, both of which can be prepared with chicken or vegetable stock.

There's a bounty of meat recipes as well, from universal Eastern European favorites like Beef-Filled Cabbage Leaves in a Sweet-and-Sour Sauce to South African Curried Beef Gratin, a spiced and slightly sweet example of how much fun you can have with Kosher cooking. Succulent Roast Chicken with a Lemon and Herb Stuffing is comfort food at its best, and Chicken and Mushroom Puff is a delicious way to use up leftover chicken and gravy, or even leftover Thanksgiving turkey.

If it sounds like there are too many delicious recipes to choose from, Judi and Evelyn have included menus for every holiday — Passover, Rosh Hashanah, Sukkot, Hanukkah, and more. For each Jewish holiday, there is a discussion of the traditions and their cultural significance, such as why, during Purim, we eat all kinds of baked and fried sweet things using chickpeas, poppy or sesame seeds (to represent golden coins), and triangular pastries (Haman's pockets).

Finish your meal with desserts like Armenian Apricot Mousse with Pistachios, Auntie Annie's Cinnamon Balls, or Great Grandma's Feather-Light Lemon Cookies, and start creating a few traditions of your own. Cooking is as much about family and friends as it is about good food, and that's just the spirit conveyed here.

Whether you've been trying to remember the recipe for a favorite dish from your childhood or you want to keep a Kosher kitchen but are looking for some exciting new flavors, this is the book for you.

Jewish people of all ages are returning to their roots and craving the long-lost recipes of generations past. What Jewish person doesn't remember his or her grandmother's special recipe for matzoh ball soup or his or her aunt's recipe for brisket, and want to share those comforting recipes with the family? And what Jewish cook wouldn't want to expand their repertoire with some fresher, lighter, more contemporary versions of their favorite family recipes?

Mother and Daughter Jewish Cooking offers recipes that embrace traditional Jewish cooking as well as innovations and world cuisines. Evelyn Rose, the mother, relates classic Jewish recipes, prepared the old-fashioned way and perfect for holidays and special occasions or those sentimental moods. Feeling more adventurous? Evelyn's daughter, Judi, offers updated classics and all new Jewish-style recipes that incorporate a wide range of flavors.

Mother and Daughter Jewish Cooking is a book that can be shared across the generations. It is a perfect gift for friends and family at holiday times as well as an everyday cookbook, reached for night after night.Jewish people of all ages are returning to their roots and craving the long-lost recipes of generations past. What Jewish person doesn't remember his or her grandmother's special recipe for matzoh ball soup or his or her aunt's recipe for brisket, and want to share those comforting recipes with the family? And what Jewish cook wouldn't want to expand their repertoire with some fresher, lighter, more contemporary versions of their favorite family recipes?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Food editor of the Jewish Chronicle and author of the classic The New Complete International Jewish Cookbook, Evelyn Rose is a well-known authority on Jewish cuisine. Now with her daughter, Judi, a writer and producer for BBC Television, Evelyn brings "together many of the most enduring dishes from Jewish communities around the world" and imbues others with a contemporary flair. A chapter on soups, for example, includes both Heimishe Winter Soup with Lentils, Barley, and Beans and an up-to-date Cream of Watercress Soup with a Toasted Walnut Garnish; a Viennese Spiced Melon Cocktail is renovated with a dressing of currant jelly, Dijon mustard and chutney. Exotic treats (South African Curried Beef Gratin) complement basics (Slow-Cooked Chicken on a Bed of Potatoes). In the spirit of passing knowledge from one generation to the next, this book contains large doses of Jewish folklore, cooking tips and family stories. (One recipe, Grandpa Rose's Pickles, was handed down through the men in the Rose family, and it took Evelyn 10 years to extricate it from her husband.) Desserts, such as Viennese Apple Squares with Cinnamon-Scented Cream and Wine and Chocolate G teau with Cappuccino Frosting, are both sophisticated and homey. Finally, a brief series of menus for various Jewish holidays helps readers incorporate the Roses' recipes into their own traditions, making this a worthwhile addition to an increasingly crowded category. 8-page color photo insert. (Mar.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688164515
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/16/2000
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.93(d)

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Read an Excerpt

Traditional Beet Borscht

Makes 6 to 8 servings

Borscht, with its glorious ruby color, is a soup that delights the eye as well as the palate. By chopping all the vegetables in the food processor, the flavor can be extracted from them very quickly, producing a very fresh-tasting soup. The processor also helps to distribute the beaten eggs that are used to thicken the soup so there's little chance of them curdling.

Cooked beet juice keeps up to 4 days under refrigeration; the complete soup, for up to 2 days. Freezes up to 2 months.

2 pounds of old beets, peeled, or 3 bunches of young beets, trimmed and cut in 1-inch chunks
1 medium carrot, peeled and cut in 1-inch chunks
1 medium onion, peeled and cut in 1-inch chunks
6 cups vegetable stock (for dairy borscht) or meat or chicken stock (for meat borscht)
1 teaspoon sea salt
15 grinds black pepper
2 tablespoons sugar

To thicken

3 tablespoons lemon juice
3 large eggs

For the garnish

Six 4-ounce or three 8-ounce potatoes, halved and boiled until tender

Have ready a 3-quart soup pot. Process the vegetables in the food processor in two batches until very finely chopped. Put in the pot with the stock, sea salt, pepper, and sugar. Bring to the boil, cover, and simmer for 20 minutes, until the vegetables are soft and the liquid is a rich, dark red.

Pour the contents of the soup pot through a coarse strainer into a bowl, pressing down firmly to extract all the juice, then discard the vegetables. Return the strained juice to the pot and leave over low heat.

Put the lemon juice and the whole eggs into the food processor and processfor 5 seconds, until well mixed. With the motor running, pour two ladlesful of the hot beet juice through the feed tube and process for a further 3 seconds, then add to the beet juice in the pot and heat gently, whisking constantly until the soup is steaming and has thickened slightly. Do not let it boil or it will curdle. When the egg has "taken" and thickened the soup, the bubbles on the surface will disappear. Taste and adjust the seasoning so that there is a gentle blend of sweet and sour.

The soup reheats well, but remember not to let it boil or it will curdle. Garnish each serving of hot borscht with pieces of boiled potato.

Variation

Borscht on the Rocks

1 small carton (about 2/3 cup) reduced-fat sour cream
Ice cubes

Make the soup with vegetable stock. Chill thoroughly. Just before serving, whisk in the sour cream. Fill wineglasses 1/3-full with ice cubes and fill up with the chilled borscht.

My mother used to make two kinds of borscht. One, cabbage borscht, is a kind of Jewish pot-au-feu, with meat (usually brisket) cooked in the soup, resulting in a happy exchange of flavors. But the borscht I remember with particular pleasure is beet borscht ("beetroot" in England), garnished with a small boiled potato. My mother had to grate the beets by hand, using a rebeizen or small handheld grater. Praise be, then, for the advent of the food processor, which takes seconds to do the same job!


Moroccan-Style Carrot, Raisin, and Toasted Nut Salad

Makes 6 to 8 servings

Another "naturalized" Israelisalad. The fruit juices make it especially refreshing, with the cumin adding a final little kick.

Keeps up to 2 days under refrigeration.Do not freeze.

1/2 cup hazelnuts, in their skins
1 1/2 pounds young carrots, peeled and coarsely grated
6 tablespoons dark raisins

For the dressing

1/2 cup reduced-fat mayonnaise
1/2 cup plain yogurt
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon orange juice
1 tablespoon light brown sugar
Pinch of sea salt
15 grinds black pepper
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

To toast the hazelnuts, preheat the oven to 350 F. Place the nuts on a baking tray and leave in the oven for 15 to 20 minutes, until they are golden brown and bursting out of the papery skins. Wrap in a dish towel, leave for 5 minutes, then rub vigorously to remove the skins. Chop the nuts coarsely and store in an air-tight container until required (they will stay crisp for several weeks).

Put the dressing ingredients into a bowl and stir well to blend, then mix in the grated carrots and the raisins. Cover and leave for several hours.

To serve, pile the carrot mixture lightly into a bowl and scatter with the nuts.

Meet the Author

Evelyn Rose is a world authority on Jewish food and the foremost Jewish food writer in Britain. Her classic book, The New Complete International Jewish Cookbook, continuously in print since 1976, is referred to by Evelyn's British fans as "the bible"! She is food editor of the weekly national British newspaper, the Jewish Chronicle. She regularly appears on the British network and cable TV as well as BBC radio, and over the years has written countless magazine articles on food and wine. She now lectures widely on the history and customs of Jewish food. Evelyn has three children and five grandchildren and lives in Manchester with her husband.

Judi Rose, Evelyn's youngest child and only daughter, has been cooking with her mother since she was tall enough to reach the kitchen counter and is passionate about food and wine. Raised in Manchester, England, Judi traveled widely as a child, enjoying culinary delights from Paris to Istanbul before she was ten years old. She lived and studied in Jerusalem for six months, before majoring in Oriental studies and the history of art at Cambridge University. Judi cooked and styled food for BBC television, where she was a writer and producer for ten years. Now a freelance writer and producer, she has worked on British and U.S. television series. She lives in New York with her culinarily adventurous husband and son.

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Mother and Daughter Jewish Cooking: Two Generations of Jewish Women Share Traditional and Contemporary Recipes 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jewish women have been cooking and handing down their recipes since Rivka cooked a savory dish with which Jacob tricked Isaac. Evelyn Rose is the food editor for the UK Jewish Chronicle and author of the cookbook nearly every Jewish home owns: The New Complete International Jewish Cookbook. Her daughter, Judi, who lives in NYC, is a producer for the BBC and is currently preparing a series on Thai cooking. Mother passes traditions and tips and lore onto daughter in this book. In addition to recipes and tips (tips on frying onions, soaking beans, chopping, preparing rice, and baking skills), folktales are also passed down to the new generation, such as how it took Evelyn ten years to coax the Rose family pickle recipe out of her husband. The Roses also include some holiday menus at the back of the book which makes it easier for you to add their recipes to your holiday presentations. For each classic Jewish recipe, the authors also present updated hybrids. For example, recipes include classic chicken soup, followed by a contemporary szechuan chicken soup with soy, ginger, or lemongrass. Hungarian Goulash soup is followed by a Spanish red pepper soup. A traditional Jewish lentil soup is paired with a Cream of Watercress; chopped chicken liver is followed by liver pate with pears and a citrus and red currant sauce; or maybe you'd prefer a vegetarian mock-liver zucchini pate. Traditional Sephardic cheese puffs are followed by contemporary French petites gougeres. A traditional Tunisian baked omelet (badinjan kuku) is followed by Israeli cream cheese pancakes. The Roses provide a recipe for a lokshen kugel that can be made with wheat and egg free asian noodles (did you know that lakcha means noodles in Turkish?), as well as an excellent recipe for a traditional Anglo-Jewish halibut in lemon sauce, and a kosher Valencian seafood-free paella. Gefilte fish is hybridized with Gefilte Fish Provencale, Marmite due Pecheur, and Normandy style fish with cider and apples. There are a dozen chicken dishes, including a lemon chicken; an orange, raisin, and honey chicken; and spice roasted chicken with apricot and bulgher stuffing. As for salad recipes; to name a few, there is Moroccan carrot-raisin; fennel, almond and black grape; Manchester style potato; cucumber; and melon, cucumber and strawberry. The desserts are to die for, need I say more? Okay, let me mention three: A traditional Queen of Sheba Flourless Chocolate Gajeau, a contemporary Viennese Apfelschnitten, and a classic Jewish Apple Pie. A very good resource for the Jewish and non-jewish cook.