Mother Jones; Fierce Fighter for Workers' Rights

Mother Jones; Fierce Fighter for Workers' Rights

by Judith Pinkerton Josephson
     
 

As a child in Ireland in the 1830s, Mary Harris Jones witnessed deadly clashes between British soldiers and peasant farmers, including her own family. Later, after immigrating to the United States, she took up the cause of American workers, adopting them as her family. For sixty years, Mother Jones crisscrossed the nation, urging men, women, and child workers to fight…  See more details below

Overview

As a child in Ireland in the 1830s, Mary Harris Jones witnessed deadly clashes between British soldiers and peasant farmers, including her own family. Later, after immigrating to the United States, she took up the cause of American workers, adopting them as her family. For sixty years, Mother Jones crisscrossed the nation, urging men, women, and child workers to fight for their rights through labor unions. In this compelling biography, Judith Pinkerton Josephson portrays the feisty spirit and unyielding determination of one of American labor's must unforgettable champions.

Editorial Reviews

The Horn Book Guide
Josephson draws on Mother Jones' letters, speeches, and auto- biography (among other sources) to quote her, "complete with her own misspellings, her own hasty punctuation--and the sometimes peppery words she herself chose" in this spirited portrait of "The Miners' Angel." The result is a biography as deliberate, focused, and accessible as its subject. Archival photos are included.
January-June 1997
Los Angeles Times
The book, named one of the best of 1997 by the School Library Journal, follows the life of Mary Harris Jones...The text, suitable for grades six and above, is accompanied by dozens of historic photos that help bring to life the suffering of those Mother Jones championed.
Kevin Baxter, May 21, 1998
Children's Literature - Sherri Byrand
Mother Jones was a feisty champion of workers' rights who didn't let old age stop her from climbing muddy mountains to reach miners. "Don't be afraid," Jones exhorted strikers, "Fear is the greatest curse we have. I never was anywhere yet that I feared anybody. I do what I think is right..." The book takes a straightforward chronological approach. Although it tells more than shows, it introduces readers to a brave woman who deserves attention and to important topics, including the harsh conditions that child workers endured.
School Library Journal
Gr 6 UpMother Jones was a fascinating figure even before her life as a labor organizer began. She lost her entire family in an epidemic just after the Civil War. Widowed, she traveled from Memphis to Chicago and set herself up as an independent seamstress, but lost her entire business in the great fire. She then turned to organizing labor, most specifically in mining. Perhaps as a replacement for her lost family, she took on the "boys" in the mines as a surrogate family, looking after their interests and urging them to organize and take action. Josephson brings this remarkable woman to life through well-documented sources and photographs of Jones and the environs in which she worked. The author deals gracefully with the various gaps that exist in Jones's life and with her wonderfully apt and grammatically lapsed letters. An accessible, genuine volume on a worthy figure in our history.Ruth K. MacDonald, Bay Path College, Longmeadow, MA

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780822549246
Publisher:
Lerner Publishing Group
Publication date:
12/28/1996
Series:
Lerner Biographies Series
Pages:
143
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 8.81(h) x 0.68(d)
Lexile:
900L (what's this?)
Age Range:
11 - 17 Years

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