Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War / Edition 1

Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War / Edition 1

4.3 3
by Drew Gilpin Faust
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0807855731

ISBN-13: 9780807855737

Pub. Date: 10/25/2004

Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press

When Confederate men marched off to battle, southern women struggled with the new responsibilities of directing farms and plantations, providing for families, and supervising increasingly restive slaves. Drew Faust offers a compelling picture of the more than half-million women who belonged to the slaveholding families of the Confederacy during this period of acute

Overview

When Confederate men marched off to battle, southern women struggled with the new responsibilities of directing farms and plantations, providing for families, and supervising increasingly restive slaves. Drew Faust offers a compelling picture of the more than half-million women who belonged to the slaveholding families of the Confederacy during this period of acute crisis, when every part of these women's lives became vexed and uncertain. Faust chronicles the clash of the old and the new within a group that was at once the beneficiary and the victim of the social order of the Old South.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807855737
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
10/25/2004
Series:
The Fred W. Morrison Series in Southern Studies
Edition description:
1
Pages:
326
Sales rank:
380,614
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.80(d)

Table of Contents

Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments

Introduction: All the Relations of Life
Chapter One: What Shall We Do: Women Confront the Crisis
Chapter Two: A World of Femininity: Changed Households and Changing Lives
Chapter Three: Enemies in Our Households: Confederate Women and Slavery
Chapter Four: We Must Go to Work, Too
Chapter Five: We Knew Little: Husbands and Wives
Chapter Six: To Be an Old Maid: Single Women, Courtship, and Desire
Chapter Seven: An Imaginary Life: Reading and Writing
Chapter Eight: Though Thou Slay Us: Women and Religion
Chapter Nine: To Relieve My Bottled Wrath: Confederate Women and Yankee Men
Chapter Ten: If I Were Once Released: The Garb of Gender
Chapter Eleven: Sick and Tired of This Horrid War: Patriotism, Sacrifice, and Self-Interest
Epilogue: We Shall Never . . . Be the Same

Afterword: The Burden of Southern History Reconsidered
Notes
Bibliographic Note
Index

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Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Faust did a good job of describing women during the Civil War. She also provided many examples of how women supported the cause of the war in the beginning and why they resented the war as the war progressed. If I were a professor, I would use this book for the reason above. Also because it shows that women were not passive during the war. I learn quite a lot from this book about southern women and some aspects of the civil war itself.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mothers of Invention is a must for anyone who has an intrest in the South during the Civil War. Faust has done an amazing job analyzing the life of 500 elite southern women and has made an insightful contribution to women's studies.
Guest More than 1 year ago
While I did not get the most pleasure out of reading this book, I did find that it taught be a lot about Confederate Women during the Civil War. Gathering information from 500 Confederate Women, Faust goes into great detail about how they were involved politically, socially, and economically in the Civil War. This book acknowledges that women did contribute to the war effort in more ways than most think. While it took me awhile to read by the end I was happy that I read it because I really did learn a lot about how the women were involved. If I were a professor I would use this book because it would really allow students to grasp that the women were critical to the survival of the economic structure of the South.