Motivated Minds: Raising Children to Love Learning

Overview

A practical guide to ensuring your child's success in school.

What makes children succeed in school? For the past twenty years, the focus has been on building children's self-esteem to help them achieve more in the classoom. But positive reinforcement hasn't necessarily resulted in measureable academic improvement. Through extensive research, combined with ongoing classroom implementation of their ideas, Deborah Stipek, Dean of the School of Education at Stanford, and Kathy Seal...

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Overview

A practical guide to ensuring your child's success in school.

What makes children succeed in school? For the past twenty years, the focus has been on building children's self-esteem to help them achieve more in the classoom. But positive reinforcement hasn't necessarily resulted in measureable academic improvement. Through extensive research, combined with ongoing classroom implementation of their ideas, Deborah Stipek, Dean of the School of Education at Stanford, and Kathy Seal have created a program that will encourage motivation and a love of learning in children from toddlerhood through elementary school.

Stipek and Seal maintain that parents and teachers can build a solid foundation for learning by helping children to develop the key elements of success: competency, autonomy, curiosity, and critical relationships. The authors offer both practical advice on understanding different learning styles and down-to-earth tips about how to manage difficult issues — competition, grades, praise, bribes, and rewards — that inevitably arise for parents and teachers.

Most important, Stipek and Seal help parents create an enriching environment for their children at home that will mesh with the school experience and become a positive, effective climate for learning.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Every parent desires a child who has a passion for learning, both in and out of the classroom. Motivated Minds pinpoints the many ways parents can instill in their children a lifelong desire and ability to learn. By encouraging and expecting competence, responsibility, goals, diligence, and self-esteem, parents can promote a child's excitement about learning. But the strength of this book is that it never loses sight of the fact that all learning should be enjoyable...for both parent and child.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
How do parents instill a lifelong love of learning in their children? Stipek, dean of the School of Education at Stanford, and Seal, a journalist and author, answer this question with well-documented studies, including research from UCLA's Corrine A. Seeds University Elementary School, a laboratory school for educational improvement where Stipek has served as director for 10 years and Seal as co-president of the parent-teacher's association for two years. Believing that "play is children's work" because it engages their interest in the world around them, Stipek and Seal encourage parents to develop their children's natural drive to learn by focusing on what they believe are the three primary components of success: competence, autonomy and relatedness (the unconditional acceptance, connection and support parents provide their children). Combining famous and fictional anecdotes and other special tips (the proper use of rewards, the role of self-esteem) with the results of current research studies, the authors provide an informative account of the broader concepts they believe are important for parents to understand so that they can create a culture of learning at home. An appendix supplies suggestions on how to assess a school and when to enroll a child in kindergarten. Despite the many studies cited, parents will find the book to be friendly and engaging, a useful resource that they can consult over the many years of their children's education. Agent, Heide Lange. (Apr. 18) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Though these parenting aids both emphasize nurture over nature, they have different focuses. Conkling, a freelance writer specializing in health and alternative medicine, believes that experience and environment can change and improve children's intelligence and, furthermore, that early stimulation can alter the size, structure, and chemistry of a child's brain ("In fact, 70 percent of your child's brain development will be complete by the time she blows out her first birthday candle," she writes in the introduction). Using research of the past 20 years, she argues that even a genius would not achieve her potential without the proper stimulation. Included are tips on assuring that maximum neural development can take place in the womb, talking to your baby and appreciating her special gifts, encouraging artistic expression and speech development, and making good food choices. Stipek, dean of the School of Education at Stanford University, and Seal, a freelance psychology and education journalist, believe that most children are born with the desire to learn but that this desire starts to decline at about middle school. Rather than focusing solely on boosting self-esteem (which she says can "do damage"), she advises parents to foster competence, autonomy, and relationship security in children. One of her most useful bits of advice is how to connect book learning to the real world. She also rightly points out that if children worry that making a mistake will make them look bad, they will avoid challenge. Caretakers, she says, should help children understand that they can feel and even get to be smarter by doing their work. Public library patrons will find both of these books helpful and approachable. Annete V. Janes, Hamilton P.L., MA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805063950
  • Publisher: Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/28/2001
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 605,492
  • Product dimensions: 6.09 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.71 (d)

Meet the Author

Deborah Stipek, Ph.D., is an internationally recognized scholar and researcher in the psychology of motivation and is involved in shaping national educational policy. She lives in Sherman Oaks, California. Kathy Seal has written for publications including The New York Times, Family Circle, and Parents as well as for educators' magazines. She lives in Santa Monica, California.

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Read an Excerpt

Introduction

Have you ever said anything like this to your child?

"I know you're in the middle of building your block castle, but you'll just have to leave it for now and finish when we get back from the store."

Or:

"Will you please get off the Internet so someone else in this house can use the phone? I don't care if you haven't read everything there is on the Web about polar bears."

If comments like these sound familiar, it means you've seen your child intensely absorbed in work that demands brainpower. It means you've witnessed self-motivation up close and your child shows signs of loving learning.

Perhaps, however, your home sounds more like this one:

MOM: Jason, please get to your homework.

(A half-hour passes.)

DAD: Jason, have you started yet? It looks to me like all you're doing is staring into space.

(Fifteen minutes later. )

MOM (voice rising): Jason, stop fiddling around right now. It's almost bedtime and you've barely started your homework! If you want to go to the basketball game Saturday, you better start studying, and I mean now!

(Jason slams his bedroom door angrily and plays a Rage Against the Machine CD at maximum volume. Mom sinks to the couch, demoralized. Dad turns on Jeopardy.)

MOM (wailing): How long can this go on? I hate fighting every night.

DAD: Me too. I'm starting to dread coming home.

Every child is born with a desire to learn. Indeed, most children enter kindergarten excited about learning to read and write, and eager to know about the world around them.

Yet by the time they reach middle school (and often before), many of our children are like Jason. They look on learning as drudgery, not the exciting opportunity that propelled them when they were little. The idea that learning can be fun all but disappears — as illustrated by a boy who thanked me for my gift of Tom Sawyer, then added, "I'll read it later. I already did my book report for this semester."

f0So if you've noticed a lack of motivation in your child, you're not alone: research has shown that American children's love of learning declines steadily from third through ninth, grade.

It doesn't have to be that way.

Over the past thirty years, psychologists have conducted hundreds of studies that show what makes children want to learn. Their research tells us how to raise a child who is interested in academic work and even finds pleasure and joy in learning. It shows us how to raise children who seek intellectual challenges, and who plow on confidently even when the going gets tough.

I am going to show you how to raise just such an enthusiastic, lifelong learner, but first we have to move beyond some ideas that research has shown are, misguided.

For the past several decades, parents have been told that the best way to encourage kids to learn is to puff up their self-esteem by piling on rewards and praise. Grades and prizes have been considered the most effective tools for motivating children to study.

But psychologists have shown that raising eager learners is not simply a matter of making children "feel good." Indeed, the research I am going to share with you reveals how such a strategy can do damage.

What we have learned, instead, is that we need to raise children who feel competent, autonomous, and secure in their relationships to others. Kids will be self-motivated to learn when they feel capable and skilled, and confident of becoming more so; when they have some choice and control over their learning; and when they feel loved, supported, and respected by their parents. Children who love learning also believe that intelligence isn't fixed and inborn, but that they can get smarter by working hard.

I will show you how to nurture in your child these four essential components of loving learning. We will also examine why children learn so well through play, and how to encourage your child's natural drive toward competence.

Although this book focuses on children from babyhood through elementary school, its general principles and recommendations apply to children of all ages, and even to adults. Everyone can follow the self-motivation model you will read about in upcoming chapters: the cycle of working hard, persisting to overcome obstacles, and being energized to do more by the feelings of pleasure brought by newly gained confidence.

But maybe the notion of your child loving learning sounds to you like an impossible dream. Perhaps, like Jason's parents, you'd be satisfied if your child would simply take charge of his own homework. So, while we'll strive together for the ideal — a p0genuine love of learning — I am also going to show you how to raise a child who studies on his own, without monitoring, nagging, or threats of punishment.

Along the way, you will learn how to solve many of the common problems that children have with their schoolwork. I will show you how to prepare your young child to succeed in school, how to build your child's self-confidence and strengthen her persistence in the face of challenging work, and how to lessen her performance anxiety so she can concentrate on learning. Together we will raze the barriers to your child succeeding in school and enjoying learning.

Learning Better and Enjoying It More

But should you bother? What does it matter if your child enjoys learning, as long as she does her schoolwork?

It matters a lot. Researchers have shown decisively that when children study because, they enjoy it, their learning is deeper, richer, and longer lasting. They are also more persistent, more creative, and more eager to do challenging work. There's an emotional payoff too: kids who want to learn feel less anxious and resentful than students coerced by bribes or threats, while achieving just as much or more.

"But I Want My Child to Score Well on Tests and Go to a Good College!"

You are probably also concerned about ensuring your child's success in the real world of report cards, standardized tests, and competitive admissions. The good news may seem paradoxical: research has shown that the indirect strategy of helping your child enjoy learning and see its value is the best way to improve your child's grades and raise her test scores.

This indirect strategy will also help you protect your child from the steep emotional price of the pressure to perform, which is mounting steadily today as tests take center stage in the politicized drive to improve our public schools. I'm going to help you cope with these testing demands while protecting your child from nail-biting anxiety and the emotional "turnoff" that are sure to follow if tests take precedence over learning.

The Good-Enough Parent

You'll find lots of practical suggestions in this book. But I don't expect you to follow them perfectly, for several reasons.

The first reason is illustrated by a well-intentioned book I once read. I don't remember the problem the book addressed, but I do remember throwing it down in disgust when it suggested that I talk like this to my children: "I'm wondering if your lost homework papers are your way of letting us know how you feel about us limiting your TV time?"

This is not that kind of book. I'm a working parent, perhaps like you. Many nights I'm too tired or preoccupied to be the sweet and patient Perfect Mother. Nor do I have all day to read Treasure Island to my son, write a three-act play based on the novel, and then sew costumes so we can act it out together. It's okay that I'm not perfect, and it's okay for you too. You don't have to be a licensed therapist, a millionaire with a household staff of twenty, or a Ph.D. / M.D./ M.B.A. to nurture your child's desire to learn. As the eminent British psychiatrist D. W. Winnicott used to say, kids don't need perfect parents. It's fine for you to be a "good-enough mother" (or father), who is "there" faithfully for your child and does what you can. No one can do more.

Furthermore, I may make a suggestion that you know for certain would not work with your child, perhaps because of her temperament. Or perhaps my strategy simply doesn't feel comfortable to you. This doesn't mean you are wrong, or that the research is mistaken. It simply means you need to adapt my suggestions to your own family. That's why parenting is more an art than a science. My advice provides solid guidelines, but you'll have to experiment to see what feels right and works best for you and your child.

Also, don't let the many strategies I suggest overwhelm you. If you can absorb the theme of this book and make its spirit your own, if you can follow a few of its tips, and if, above all, you let your child know that you value learning highly, that will be good enough. You'll give your family a healthy learning environment, and your child will stand a great chance of loving learning.

Raising children who want to learn is not a utopian dream or an unaffordable luxury. It's something every parent can achieve. It's also a key to improving American education, one that has been lost in our panic to increase achievement test scores. Imagine what it would be like if the majority of our children wanted to learn, plain and simple. Imagine if school-age kids enjoyed the expansion of their skills and knowledge the same way they enjoyed learning to recognize new letters, count to ten, ride a bike, or swim. They would be unstoppable, and our national quest to improve education would be infinitely easier.

So for your child's sake, and the nation's sake — read on.

*End notes have been omitted

Copyright © 2001 Deborah Stipek and Kathy Seal

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