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Motor Dog

Overview

Here's a tale of a boy and his robotic best (canine) friend. When Scoot the Cat comes on the scene, Motor Dog does what any normal dog would do: gives chase! Our boy Flip does everything he can to call him off, but no commands-verbal or electronic-can stop his new dog. When Flip runs after his malfunctioning pet, things go haywire! Will Motor Dog come through when Flip's in danger?

Merging Kurt Cyrus' dynamic poetry with David Gordon's stellar art makes for a wham-bam ...

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Overview

Here's a tale of a boy and his robotic best (canine) friend. When Scoot the Cat comes on the scene, Motor Dog does what any normal dog would do: gives chase! Our boy Flip does everything he can to call him off, but no commands-verbal or electronic-can stop his new dog. When Flip runs after his malfunctioning pet, things go haywire! Will Motor Dog come through when Flip's in danger?

Merging Kurt Cyrus' dynamic poetry with David Gordon's stellar art makes for a wham-bam combination of fast-paced peril and classic storytelling that begs to be read again and again.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
12/09/2013
A robot dog seems like the ideal pet until it gets one look at a neighborhood cat. Then its special features kick in of their own accord, and the dumbfounded owner, a redheaded boy named Flip, finds himself airborne. At the other end of the leash, Motor Dog pursues its prey down the street and into the trees: “ ‘Hold your horses! Shift your gears!’/ Motor Dog switched off his ears./ Then he lit his booster rocket./ Flip’s right shoulder left its socket.” With a premise updated for the digital age (Flip orders Motor Dog off the Internet using a tablet he has secreted under the bedcovers), Cyrus (Your Skeleton Is Showing) and Gordon (Off Go Their Engines, Off Go Their Lights) have created an entertaining addition to the be-careful-what-tech-you-wish-for shelf. Gordon’s spreads have a palpable dynamism combined with a painterly elegance; some readers may be reminded of the work of William Joyce. An irreverent tribute to the bond between boy and (bionically enhanced) dog. Ages 4–8. Author’s agent: Michael Stearns, Upstart Crow Literary. (Feb.)
From the Publisher
PreS-Gr 2 A boy named Flip orders a computerized dog with "bonus features" from the Internet. When it arrives, he uses the remote control to take his new pet for a walk. Trouble ensues when it starts chasing a live cat. When the kitty climbs a tree, Motor Dog sprouts rocket blasters to zoom up after it. No matter how frantically he pushes the control buttons, Flip can't get the computerized canine to stop. When he loses his grip on the leash and starts to fall from the height of the tree, Motor Dog does the right thing and rescues its owner. Flip decides that he doesn't need all that electronic gadgetry and accepts his newly named Buddy as a regular dog. Cyrus's rhyming story moves along at a fast clip, with an occasional stumble sometimes the sound effects printed in red are part of the verse, and other times they aren't. Gordon's creative use of perspective enhances the chase scenes. This light romp is an easy read for today's gadget-obsessed kids. Martha Simpson, Stratford Library Association, CT—SLJ

A robot dog seems like the ideal pet until it gets one look at a neighborhood cat. Then its special features kick in of their own accord, and the dumbfounded owner, a redheaded boy named Flip, finds himself airborne. At the other end of the leash, Motor Dog pursues its prey down the street and into the trees: " Hold your horses! Shift your gears!'/ Motor Dog switched off his ears./ Then he lit his booster rocket./ Flip's right shoulder left its socket." With a premise updated for the digital age (Flip orders Motor Dog off the Internet using a tablet he has secreted under the bedcovers), Cyrus (Your Skeleton Is Showing) and Gordon (Off Go Their Engines, Off Go Their Lights) have created an entertaining addition to the be-careful-what-tech-you-wish-for shelf. Gordon's spreads have a palpable dynamism combined with a painterly elegance; some readers may be reminded of the work of William Joyce. An irreverent tribute to the bond between boy and (bionically enhanced) dog. Ages 4 8.—PW

MOTOR DOG Author: Cyrus, Kurt Illustrator: Gordon, David Review Issue Date: February 1, 2014 ISBN: 9781423168225 Young Flip finds Motor Dog in an online catalog. Intrigued by a pet with bonus features, he places his order. But even if Motor Dog is remote controlled, his instincts are pure organic, and he is soon chasing a neighborhood cat around the block and up a tree. Rambunctious puppies are difficult enough to handle, and when they come with a rocket booster-well, forget it. But Motor Dog proves that he is still man's best friend, despite the metal casing and heart of circuitry. Like Motor Dog himself, the book is full of energy and fun, from the creative rhyming text to the turbocharged illustrations. Little details-like the fact that Motor Dog's remote control interferes with electronics across the neighborhood and that the cat makes off with the rocket boosters at the end of the story-add to the chaos. Although Flip decides he likes Motor Dog best without the enhancements, this is not a book that pits digital appeal against traditional play; it's simply a funny story and should have a wide audience. - Kara Dean—Booklist

A boy named Flip orders a robotic dog from the Internet in this cleverly rhymed story that manages to be both original in concept and conventional in portraying the bond between boy and dog. The snappy, effective text will grab readers with its bouncy rhythm and catchy rhymes, like Motor Dog/catalog and extra stuff/ruff! ruff! Motor Dog is remote-controlled and jet-propelled, and he comes with a booster rocket and a convenient parachute. Instead of conventional dog-training commands, Flip makes him behave with lots of computer terms that will draw kids into believing in the premise of an electronic pet. On a walk with Flip, Motor Dog spots a cat and takes off in pursuit, chasing the cat up a tree and flying up to attack with the help of his helicopter attachment. All this causes Flip to decide he would rather have just a regular dog, so he strips Motor Dog of all his extra gear and calls him just plain Buddy. The cat, though, seeing opportunity in the discarded gadgetry, turns himself into Rocket Cat, flying off the final page in a satisfying conclusion. The bold illustrations are full of motion and varied perspectives, with sound-effect words set in red display type. An amusing fable for the techno-savvy and Luddites alike. (Picture book. 4-10)—Kirkus

School Library Journal
02/01/2014
PreS-Gr 2—A boy named Flip orders a computerized dog with "bonus features" from the Internet. When it arrives, he uses the remote control to take his new pet for a walk. Trouble ensues when it starts chasing a live cat. When the kitty climbs a tree, Motor Dog sprouts rocket blasters to zoom up after it. No matter how frantically he pushes the control buttons, Flip can't get the computerized canine to stop. When he loses his grip on the leash and starts to fall from the height of the tree, Motor Dog does the right thing and rescues its owner. Flip decides that he doesn't need all that electronic gadgetry and accepts his newly named Buddy as a regular dog. Cyrus's rhyming story moves along at a fast clip, with an occasional stumble-sometimes the sound effects printed in red are part of the verse, and other times they aren't. Gordon's creative use of perspective enhances the chase scenes. This light romp is an easy read for today's gadget-obsessed kids.—Martha Simpson, Stratford Library Association, CT
Kirkus Reviews
2013-12-18
A boy named Flip orders a robotic dog from the Internet in this cleverly rhymed story that manages to be both original in concept and conventional in portraying the bond between boy and dog. The snappy, effective text will grab readers with its bouncy rhythm and catchy rhymes, like Motor Dog/catalog and extra stuff/ruff! ruff! Motor Dog is remote-controlled and jet-propelled, and he comes with a booster rocket and a convenient parachute. Instead of conventional dog-training commands, Flip makes him behave with lots of computer terms that will draw kids into believing in the premise of an electronic pet. On a walk with Flip, Motor Dog spots a cat and takes off in pursuit, chasing the cat up a tree and flying up to attack with the help of his helicopter attachment. All this causes Flip to decide he would rather have just a regular dog, so he strips Motor Dog of all his extra gear and calls him just plain Buddy. The cat, though, seeing opportunity in the discarded gadgetry, turns himself into Rocket Cat, flying off the final page in a satisfying conclusion. The bold illustrations are full of motion and varied perspectives, with sound-effect words set in red display type. An amusing fable for the techno-savvy and Luddites alike. (Picture book. 4-10)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781423168225
  • Publisher: Disney-Hyperion
  • Publication date: 2/25/2014
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 495,600
  • Age range: 3 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.60 (w) x 11.30 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Kurt Cyrus has illustrated numerous picture books, including Buddy: The Story of Buddy Holly by Anne Bustard, Mammoths on the Move by Lisa Wheeler, and his own The Voyage of Turtle Rex and Hotel Deep: Light Verse from Dark Water. He is also the author of Your Skeleton Is Showing, illustrated by Crab Scrambly. He lives in Cottage Grove, Oregon. Visit him at www.kurtcyrus.com.

David Gordon (www.illustrationranch.com) is an author and illustrator, and has also done concept work for Pixar's Toy Story and Toy Story 2; A Bug's Life; Monsters, Inc.; and Cars, as well as the hit Nickelodeon cartoon show SpongeBob SquarePants. He helped design the characters in BlueSky's feature film Robots. David Gordon lives in New York City, where he continues to create stories for children.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 18, 2014

    This is a super cute kids book. Motor Dog reminds me of the rob

    This is a super cute kids book.

    Motor Dog reminds me of the robotic dog in Jimmy Neutron, but cuter! He isn't so robotic looking.

    The entire book rhymes which I love and it really comes down to a friendship and loving bond between dog and boy.

    My 6 year old carried this book with him for days when we first got it - he is a big fan!

    I highly recommend this book for younger kids. The book recommends ages 3-5 years or Preschool through Kindergarten. I definitely think it is for the learning readers and could possibly go up to 6 or 7 years old and 1st or 2nd grade!

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