Mousetronaut: A Partially True Story

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Overview

A heartwarming picture book tale of the power of the small, from bestselling author and retired NASA astronaut Commander Mark Kelly.

Astronaut Mark Kelly flew with “mice-tronauts” on his first spaceflight aboard space shuttle Endeavour in 2001. Mousetronaut tells the story of a small mouse that wants nothing more than to travel to outer space. The little mouse works as hard as the bigger mice to show readiness for the mission . . . and is chosen for the flight! While in space, ...

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Overview

A heartwarming picture book tale of the power of the small, from bestselling author and retired NASA astronaut Commander Mark Kelly.

Astronaut Mark Kelly flew with “mice-tronauts” on his first spaceflight aboard space shuttle Endeavour in 2001. Mousetronaut tells the story of a small mouse that wants nothing more than to travel to outer space. The little mouse works as hard as the bigger mice to show readiness for the mission . . . and is chosen for the flight! While in space, the astronauts are busy with their mission when disaster strikes—and only the smallest member of the crew can save the day. With lively illustrations by award-winning artist C. F. Payne, Mousetronaut is a charming tale of perseverance, courage, and the importance of the small!

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Author Mark Kelly isn't joshing when he claims that his "mousetronaut" story is partially true. As a real NASA astronaut, he once traveled into space with 18 "mice-tronauts," one of which actually seemed to enjoy his first time away from gravity's pull. In this new picture book, the tiniest member of the astronaut crew saves the day after a disaster threatens the mission. (P.S. Kelly, now retired, is the husband of former U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords. His astronaut credentials are impressive: He logged over 15 million miles in space and more than 600 orbits of Earth.)

Publishers Weekly
In an afterword, former astronaut Kelly (who is also the husband of Gabrielle Giffords) recalls that on his first Endeavor flight, the research mice on board would have nothing to do with weightlessness and clung to the mesh of their cage for the entire mission—except one, “smaller than the rest, seemed to enjoy the experience and effortlessly floated around the cage.” Inspired by this real-life mouse, Kelly’s first children’s book tells the story of Meteor, a lightly anthropomorphized rodent who turns his tininess into an advantage when an important key gets stuck in a crack between two monitors. The understated, quietly intense prose (“ ‘This isn’t good,’ says the commander. ‘We need that key back’ ”) is just right for the particular breed of hero that is the American astronaut, and the narrative stakes are just high enough for the younger end of the target audience. Payne (Hide-and-Squeak) contributes muscular, handsomely textured images and vivid portraits that make it absolutely clear that space travel is a larger-than-life adventure. Ages 4–8. Agent: Robert Barnett, Williams & Connolly. (Oct.)
The New York Times Book Review
Here the mouse is headed in the opposite direction. This first children’s book by Kelly, a retired astronaut and husband of former Representative Gabrielle Giffords, builds on his experience with real mice aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. Eighteen of them. In this winning story there are six, and as the smallest one, Meteor gets to perform his own special mission. After helping the astronauts out of a potential Apollo 13 calamity, Meteor is declared a hero—sure to please many fellow pipsqueaks back on Earth.
The New York Times Book Reivew
Here the mouse is headed in the opposite direction. This first children’s book by Kelly, a retired astronaut and husband of former Representative Gabrielle Giffords, builds on his experience with real mice aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. Eighteen of them. In this winning story there are six, and as the smallest one, Meteor gets to perform his own special mission. After helping the astronauts out of a potential Apollo 13 calamity, Meteor is declared a hero—sure to please many fellow pipsqueaks back on Earth.
From the Publisher
Diminutive size proves to be an advantage on a shuttle mission.

Meteor the mouse would dearly love to join the shuttle crew, but all the other mice know he’s too small. The human shuttle commander’s had his eye on Meteor, though, and seeing his motivation, chooses him for one of the six mouse spots. Meteor is such a “natural” in zero gravity, he’s allowed out of the cage, aka the Mouse Hotel. The human astronauts are busy on spacewalks and conducting experiments, but there’s not much for Meteor to do. When the key to the control panel becomes stuck in a tight spot, the commander says, “This isn’t good.” Human fingers are too thick, but Meteor saves the day. Kelly, a retired astronaut, puts his expertise to work, naturally sliding the tiniest details of life on a shuttle into his story. Even in space, astronauts answer email; it goes without saying that at least one of the astronauts is a woman; and who knew you needed keys on a space shuttle? (Probably appropriately, the exact role of the mice on the mission is never explored.) Payne has a good time with his illustrations, investing little Meteor with a suitably outsized personality and making his multicultural human shuttle crew look normal as normal can be—like Meteor, maybe child readers can become astronauts, too.

This little mouse may well inspire some big dreams. (afterword, further reading) (Picture book. 3-6)

Kirkus, September 15, 2012

In this picture book based on the space shuttle Endeavor, mice are being trained alongside human astronauts and selected to accompany the 2001 mission. Meteor is one of the smallest mice, but the most hardworking. After the suspenseful liftoff, an irreplaceable key gets stuck between control panels, and he hurls into action to save the mission. The concise, energetic writing works in tandem with the highly detailed and expressive, softly crosshatched cartoon art. The tone of the story is celebratory, but also gives an authentic glimpse into daily life on a space shuttle. Close-ups of characters reveal humorous surprise or just pure glee. The astronauts dub Meteor with the title “Mousetronaut” due to his bravery and service. Librarians will want to share the inspiration for this tale included in the afterword, an informative essay on man’s quest to overcome gravity and fly. Apparently, during the duration of the flight, only one of the 18 mice onboard the Endeavor playfully and contentedly floated in zero gravity. The rest clung to the cage. The values of being small, useful, solving problems, and working hard–as opposed to being big and strong–will inspire young readers. The bibliography is outstanding as is the kid-friendly list of Internet sources featuring sites with games and videos.

In an afterword, former astronaut Kelly (who is also the husband of Gabrielle Giffords) recalls that on his first Endeavor flight, the research mice on board would have nothing to do with weightlessness and clung to the mesh of their cage for the entire mission—except one, “smaller than the rest, [who] seemed to enjoy the experience and effortlessly floated around the cage.” Inspired by this real-life mouse, Kelly’s first children’s book tells the story of Meteor, a lightly anthropomorphized rodent who turns his tininess into an advantage when an important key gets stuck in a crack between two monitors. The understated, quietly intense prose (“ ‘This isn’t good,’ says the commander. ‘We need that key back’ ”) is just right for the particular breed of hero that is the American astronaut, and the narrative stakes are just high enough for the younger end of the target audience. Payne (Hide-and-Squeak) contributes muscular, handsomely textured images and vivid portraits that make it absolutely clear that space travel is a larger-than-life adventure. Ages 4–8.

Here the mouse is headed in the opposite direction. This first children’s book by Kelly, a retired astronaut and husband of former Representative Gabrielle Giffords, builds on his experience with real mice aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. Eighteen of them. In this winning story there are six, and as the smallest one, Meteor gets to perform his own special mission. After helping the astronauts out of a potential Apollo 13 calamity, Meteor is declared a hero—sure to please many fellow pipsqueaks back on Earth.

Kirkus Reviews
Diminutive size proves to be an advantage on a shuttle mission. Meteor the mouse would dearly love to join the shuttle crew, but all the other mice know he's too small. The human shuttle commander's had his eye on Meteor, though, and seeing his motivation, chooses him for one of the six mouse spots. Meteor is such a "natural" in zero gravity, he's allowed out of the cage, aka the Mouse Hotel. The human astronauts are busy on spacewalks and conducting experiments, but there's not much for Meteor to do. When the key to the control panel becomes stuck in a tight spot, the commander says, "This isn't good." Human fingers are too thick, but Meteor saves the day. Kelly, a retired astronaut, puts his expertise to work, naturally sliding the tiniest details of life on a shuttle into his story. Even in space, astronauts answer email; it goes without saying that at least one of the astronauts is a woman; and who knew you needed keys on a space shuttle? (Probably appropriately, the exact role of the mice on the mission is never explored.) Payne has a good time with his illustrations, investing little Meteor with a suitably outsized personality and making his multicultural human shuttle crew look normal as normal can be—like Meteor, maybe child readers can become astronauts, too. This little mouse may well inspire some big dreams. (afterword, further reading) (Picture book. 3-6)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
As astronauts prepare for a space shuttle launch, mice that are going along are also in training. Although the other mice think that he is too small, Meteor has worked hard, and is pleased to be selected for the journey. After lift-off, he enjoys weightlessness and a tour of the shuttle. As the astronauts perform their space walks and experiments, Meteor feels unneeded, until the essential key to the control panel falls and gets stuck between monitors. No one can get it out. Being small enough, however, Meteor squeezes in to retrieve the key and save the mission. On return to Earth, Meteor is declared a hero and officially titled "Mousetronaut." Mixed media on double-page scenes supply details of the preparation and flight. Along with the factual report, a scene showing a quintet of anthropomorphic mice exercising provides a touch of fantasy and comic delight. The scenes of lift-off and aboard the shuttle are by contrast remarkably realistic. Charming Meteor smiles proudly in his space suit amid the planets and stars on the jacket/cover. Kelly, an astronaut, brings us with him on the mission while presenting a special mouse like those that flew with him. Additional factual information and a bibliography are included. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—In this picture book based on the space shuttle Endeavor, mice are being trained alongside human astronauts and selected to accompany the 2001 mission. Meteor is one of the smallest mice, but the most hardworking. After the suspenseful liftoff, an irreplaceable key gets stuck between control panels, and he hurls into action to save the mission. The concise, energetic writing works in tandem with the highly detailed and expressive, softly crosshatched cartoon art. The tone of the story is celebratory, but also gives an authentic glimpse into daily life on a space shuttle. Close-ups of characters reveal humorous surprise or just pure glee. The astronauts dub Meteor with the title "Mousetronaut" due to his bravery and service. Librarians will want to share the inspiration for this tale included in the afterword, an informative essay on man's quest to overcome gravity and fly. Apparently, during the duration of the flight, only one of the 18 mice onboard the Endeavor playfully and contentedly floated in zero gravity. The rest clung to the cage. The values of being small, useful, solving problems, and working hard-as opposed to being big and strong-will inspire young readers. The bibliography is outstanding as is the kid-friendly list of Internet sources featuring sites with games and videos.—Sara Lissa Paulson, American Sign Language and English Lower School, New York City
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442458246
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books
  • Publication date: 10/9/2012
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 68,395
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.10 (w) x 10.30 (h) x 0.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Mark Kelly was a Captain in the United States Navy when he commanded the final mission of Space Shuttle Endeavour in May of 2011. A veteran of four space flights to the International Space Station he is a graduate of the United States Merchant Marine Academy and holds a masters degree from the U.S. Naval Post Graduate School. As a naval aviator he flew thirty-nine combat missions in Operation Desert Storm in 1991.

C. F. Payne has illustrated more than a dozen picture books, including the Texas Bluebonnet winner Shoeless Joe & Black Betsy and Turkey Bowl, both written by Phil Bildner. He also illustrated the New York Times bestsellers The Remarkable Farkle McBride and Micawber, both by John Lithgow. C.F Payne lives in Cincinnati, Ohio, with his wife and children. Visit him at CFPayne.com.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 6 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 15, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Great book about space shuttles

    “Mousetronaut” is a book about a mouse called Meteor. The mouse is smaller than the other mice. He gets to go up in the space shuttle and helps the astronauts in the space shuttle.

    I think other kids would enjoy this book because it is about space shuttles. Other kids would like space shuttles.

    My favorite part was when Meteor gets to come out of his cage and gets a tour of the space shuttle.


    Review by Young Mensan Bram P., age 4

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 10, 2012

    Perfect book

    This is a fabulous, clearly written, book with lovely illustrations. The idea that the smallest mouse trains the hardest and then "saves the day" and gets recognition for his attitude and his hard work is the perfect message to give young children. The illustrations are realistic and encourage interest in space & science. My 4 year-old grandson loved hearing it, and then my 6 year-old granddaughter enjoyed reading it to herself although it's not written for early readers. We read it several times & my grandkids came up with interesting questions every time.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 2, 2012

    Great story and illustrations!

    This looked like a cute book and I wasn't disappointed! The illustrations are great. Meteor is full of personality and shows that even the smallest one of us can help out. The story is based on fact, (mice did go into space) and there is a good history of the background of the mousetronaut and space program in the back of the book. Thanks to Mark Kelly for bringing us this story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2012

    Highly recommend for ALL ages!

    Just happened to see Mark Kelly on TV showing book--it was an instant eye catcher. Purchased for my grandson and we all had a learning expierence from the facts and fiction.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 24, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Beautifully illustrated story perfect for the aspiring astronaut

    A space mission is getting ready to leave, and everyone is excited. Along with all the astronauts, six mice will get to go on the mission as well. Meteor is the smallest of the mice, and he really wants to go on the mission so he has been working really hard. When it is time to decide, five of the biggest and strongest mice are chosen, but because of his hard work so is Meteor.

    During the space mission the key to the control panel gets stuck in a crack. None of the astronauts can get it out, but Meteor is small and wants to be helpful. Will Meteor save the mission?

    Mousetronaut is perfect for the budding astronaut with striking illustrations and a fun storyline. Written by Astronaut Mark Kelly, Mousetronaut is inspired by one of the mice on his first mission in space aboard the Endeavour in 2001. Included at the end of the book is a brief afterword by Mark Kelly that includes a brief history of the space program and life as an astronaut.

    Recommended for readers age 4-8.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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