Movement Control / Edition 1 by Paul Cordo | 9780521456074 | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Movement Control / Edition 1

Movement Control / Edition 1

by Paul Cordo
     
 

ISBN-10: 052145607X

ISBN-13: 9780521456074

Pub. Date: 11/28/2004

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Movement is arguably the most fundamental and important function of the nervous system, since the organism cannot exist without it. Purposive movement requires the coordination of actions within many areas of the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, basal ganglia, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves and sensory receptors, which together must control a highly complex

Overview

Movement is arguably the most fundamental and important function of the nervous system, since the organism cannot exist without it. Purposive movement requires the coordination of actions within many areas of the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, basal ganglia, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves and sensory receptors, which together must control a highly complex biomechanical apparatus made up of the skeleton and muscles. Beginning at the level of biomechanics and spinal reflexes and proceeding upward to brain structures in the cerebellum, brainstem, and cerebral cortex, the chapters in this volume of a special issue of Behavioral and Brain Sciences devoted to this topic highlight important issues in movement control. Commentaries provide a balanced treatment of the articles by experts in a variety of areas related to movement, including behavior, physiology, robotics, and mathematics.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521456074
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
11/28/2004
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
292
Product dimensions:
8.62(w) x 10.87(h) x 0.63(d)

Table of Contents

1. Does the nervous system use equilibrium-point control to guide single and multiple joint movements? E. Bizzi, N. Hogan, F. A. Mussa-Ivaldi and S. Giszter; 2. Does the nervous system use kinesthetic input to control natural limb movements? S. Gandevia and D. Burke; 3. Can sense be made of spinal interneuron circuits? D. A. McCrea; 4. Implications of neural networks for how we think about brain function D. A. Robinson; 5. Do cortical and basal ganglia motor areas use 'motor programs' to control movement? G. E. Alexander, M. R. DeLong and M. D. Crutcher; 6. Functional heterogeneity with structural homogeneity: how does the cerebellum operate? J. R. Bloedel; 7. Are movement parameters recognizably coded in activity of single neurons? E. E. Fetz; 8. Posterior parietal cortex and egocentric space J. F. Stein; Open peer commentary; Authors' responses.

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