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Movie Speak: How to Talk Like You Belong on a Movie Set
     

Movie Speak: How to Talk Like You Belong on a Movie Set

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by Tony Bill
 

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When is "groucho" not a comedian? A "seagull" not a bird? A "banana" not a fruit, and a "taco cart" not a food stand? What's the "Castle rock rule" and when should you call for a "buff & puff"? And why expect trouble when the A.D. (assistant director) knowingly mumbles "Gone With the Wind in

Overview

When is "groucho" not a comedian? A "seagull" not a bird? A "banana" not a fruit, and a "taco cart" not a food stand? What's the "Castle rock rule" and when should you call for a "buff & puff"? And why expect trouble when the A.D. (assistant director) knowingly mumbles "Gone With the Wind in the morning, Dukes of Hazzard after lunch"? An oral tradition gathered and passed down for more than a hundred years, the language of moviemaking, like other secret lexicons, is the only accepted way of communicating on a set—and is all but unknown to the outside world. Technical, odd, colorful, mysterious, the working language of movies sheds light not only on the hugely complex process of making a film, but on the invisible hierarchies of a set, the unspoken etiquette between cast and crew, and the evolution of a process that's endlessly fascinating.

Movie Speak is a book about language, but through language also a book about what it’s really like to be a director or a producer or an actor or a crew member. An Oscarwinning producer (The Sting), actor (who worked with Spielberg, Coppola, and Sydney Pollock), and director (Five Corners, Flyboys, My Bodyguard, and more), Tony Bill has been on sets for more than 30 years and brings a writer's love of language to this collection of hundreds of film terms. A futz. A cowboy. A Brodkin and a double Brodkin (a.k.a. screamer). Streaks ’n tips, a Lewinsky, Green Acres, rhubarb, a peanut, a Gary Coleman, snot tape, twin buttes, manmaker (and why you can yell for one if needed for a grip, but must whisper if it's for Tom Cruise)—these are the tricks of the trade.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761143598
Publisher:
Workman Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
01/08/2009
Edition description:
Original
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
363,530
Product dimensions:
4.38(w) x 6.28(h) x 0.43(d)

Meet the Author

Tony Bill started out in Hollywood as an actor, became an Oscar-winning producer (The Sting), and then a director for film (My Bodyguard, Five Corners, Untamed Heart, Flyboys, and more) and television (Truman Capote's "One Christmas," Harlan County War, Pictures of Hollis Woods). He teaches and lectures widely on film and lives with his family in the oldest house in Venice, California.

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Movie Speak: How to Talk Like You Belong on a Movie Set 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
billdill More than 1 year ago
I should have taken the advice of the store and sat down and read a couple of pages. I thought it would be filled with anecdotes about celebrities. It just wasn't what I thought it would be. My fault. I'm sure its a wonderful book but, not my cup of tea.
readingrules More than 1 year ago
We got this for a high school aged nephew who already makes short videos and special effects for his own and others' performances, and I ended up reading it cover to cover before we gave it to him. It is full of really interesting, very unusual and hilarious descriptions of the terms used on a movie set. Tony Bill is a great writer and has managed to make what is essentially a "dictionary" into a great read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago