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The Mozart Conspiracy (Ben Hope Series #2)
     

The Mozart Conspiracy (Ben Hope Series #2)

4.0 42
by Scott Mariani, Steven Crossley (Narrated by)
 

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A centuries-old mystery. An “accidental” death. A conspiracy that may end in murder. Former British Special Air Service officer Ben Hope is running for his life. Enlisted by Leigh Llewellyn—the beautiful, world-famous opera star and Ben’s first love—to investigate her brother, Oliver’s, mysterious death, Ben finds himself caught

Overview

A centuries-old mystery. An “accidental” death. A conspiracy that may end in murder. Former British Special Air Service officer Ben Hope is running for his life. Enlisted by Leigh Llewellyn—the beautiful, world-famous opera star and Ben’s first love—to investigate her brother, Oliver’s, mysterious death, Ben finds himself caught up in a puzzle dating back to the 1700s.

At the time of his death, Oliver was working on a new book about Mozart. Though the official report states that Oliver died in a tragic accident, the facts don’t add up. But as Ben and Leigh dig deeper, they find that Oliver’s research reveals that Mozart, a notable Freemason, may have been killed by a shadowy and powerful splinter group of the organization. The only proof lies in a missing letter, believed to have been written by Mozart himself. When Leigh and Ben receive a video documenting a ritual sacrifice performed by hooded men, they realize that the sect is still in existence today and will stop at nothing to keep its secrets.

From the dreaming spires of Oxford and Venice’s labyrinthine canals to the majestic architecture of Vienna, Ben and Leigh must race across Europe to uncover the truth behind the Mozart conspiracy before they become its next victims. In the tradition of Robert Ludlum and Dan Brown, Scott Mariani’s The Mozart Conspiracy is an electrifying thriller and the start of an exciting new series.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal - Audio
In Mariani's sixth Ben Hope thriller, the British soldier-turned-security specialist finds himself looking into the murder of an old friend, whose famous opera singer sister was once his lover. A letter purported to have been written by Mozart leads Hope to a murderous organization run by a cadre of Europe's most powerful men. While Mariani offers several suspenseful, if not quite credible, set pieces, his tale is too derivative. Steven Crossley's somewhat patrician voice and delivery at first seem ill suited to such violent action, but Crossley excels at creating distinctive voices for the characters, especially a chillingly gruff sadistic killer. This should appeal to fans of Dan Brown, Lee Child, and Daniel Silva, whose works Mariani clearly has studied carefully. ["This series launch might appeal to male readers in the mood for a bit of fast-paced action without too much mental exertion," read the review of the Touchstone: S. & S. hc, LJ 2/1/11; the mass market Pocket pb will publish in December.—Ed.]—Michael Adams, CUNY Graduate Ctr. Lib.
Publishers Weekly
British author Miriani makes his U.S. debut with the second in his series featuring ex-SAS warrior Ben Hope, a fast, exciting read in The Da Vinci Code tradition. Ben is on his way home from a mission when he receives a message from Leigh Llewellyn, an old flame and international opera star, saying she needs his help. Leigh is the sister of Ben's late friend, Oliver, who was at work on a book on Mozart when he died under mysterious circumstances. When Ben takes Leigh to the English countryside to guard her, deadly thugs attempt to kill them both. A lost Mozart letter, written in 1791 shortly before the composer's death and first discovered by Leigh's father, implicates a shadowy European group known as the Order of Ra, which remains a powerful secret force in Europe today. None of this matters much to either Ben or the reader as he singlehandedly kills his way to the top of the evil cabal. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
"The Mozart Conspiracy hits thrilling, suspenseful notes . . . it's a rollickingly good way to pass some time in an easy chair." USA Today

"Mariani channels Dan Brown on steroids in this exciting (and violent) historical puzzle thriller…Racing along at breakneck speed and promising more in a series, this action read will excite fans of Brown, James Rollins, and Robert Ludlum. Booklist

"A fast, exciting read in The Da Vinci Code tradition.” —Publishers Weekly

The Mozart Conspiracy is music to the minds of thriller fans. Now readers on both sides of the Atlantic can enjoy Scott Mariani's gift for international menace with a Continental flair.” —Thomas Greanias, author of The Promised War

“James Bond meets Jason Bourne Meets The Da Vinci Code, in a tale as driven as a dark Mozart symphony—but Scott Mariani writes with a steely lightness that is all his own.” —Jennifer Lee Carrell, New York Times bestselling author of Interred With Their Bones

The Mozart Conspiracy is an action-packed thriller that introduces a fine, new hero, retired British commando Benedict Hope, a former soldier who's tormented by regret. In a wild chase across Europe, Hope uses his violent talents to track down a nefarious cabal that secretly controls the destinies of nations. The novel is fast-paced and fun, and Hope is a hero you can't help but root for.” —Mark Alpert, author of Final Theory

"Scott Mariani is an author to watch." —M.J. Rose, international bestselling author of The Reincarnationist.

Library Journal
Retired from the British army's Special Air Service, Benedict Hope is a crisis-response consultant. He has just finished a dangerous mission rescuing two young girls from a ring of pedophiles when he is contacted by his long-lost love, famous opera singer Leigh Llewellyn. She's been attacked, inexplicably it seems, and the two embark on a country-hopping, car-smashing, bullet-flying, nun-killing (yep, you read it right) adventure complete with a ritual killing, while trying to find the connection between a letter believed to have been written by Mozart and the mysterious death of Leigh's brother. Fast paced? Definitely. Exciting? It would be if the plot weren't entirely predictable, the characters one-dimensional, and the dialog lackluster. While this title might beg a comparison to Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code, it doesn't even come close. VERDICT First published in Britain, this series launch might appeal to male readers in the mood for a bit of fast-paced action without too much mental exertion. For more substantial characters and a meatier plot, try Michael Gruber's The Book of Air and Shadows.—Julie Pierce, Ft. Myers-Lee Cty. P.L., FL
Kirkus Reviews

Mariani's debut is a globetrotting action fantasy with one eye fixed firmly onThe Da Vinci Codeand the other on Hollywood.

Does any of this sound familiar? Centuries ago, a beloved artist got in bad with a powerful fraternal organization because one of his best-known productions contained codes that revealed its most closely guarded secrets. The artist died, but the organization lives on as an international conspiracy that's still working criminal mischief all over the map of present-day Europe. This time around, the artist is Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the tell-all production isThe Magic Flute,and the conspirators are the Order of Ra, a rogue Masonic faction whose hobby is ritual murder. Instead of sweating the details of the artist's life or work or the specific content or meaning of the codes that so threatened the Masons, or even convincingly linking conspiracies past and present, Mariani falls back on that old chestnut, the British agent reunited with the girl he left behind. The spy is Benedict Hope, whose SAS assignment is to rescue kidnap victims. The lady is opera star Leigh Llewellyn, whose brother Oliver was executed last year after he stumbled across the Order of Ra's latest handiwork. Leigh has spent 15 years getting over Ben, but he's still the person she calls when she barely escapes a kidnap attempt herself. Sure enough, her troubles stem from the book Olly had been writing about Mozart's death. The search for clues, coupled with a chase after bad guys, sometimes away from them, takes Ben and Leigh—and soon enough, their ally, Viennese cop Markus Kinski—across the Continent in brief chapters headed by place names you just know will appear as subtitles in the movie version too.

Mariani likes to separate his heroes so that he can cut back and forth between them as they're getting simultaneously ambushed in equally picturesque locales. Nor is he averse to a high body count. Apart from the rumor that he was poisoned, though, don't expect to learn much about Mozart.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781449847753
Publisher:
Recorded Books, LLC
Publication date:
03/22/2011
Series:
Ben Hope Series , #2

Meet the Author

Scott Mariani grew up in St. Andrews, Scotland. He studied Modern Languages at Oxford and went on to work as a translator, a professional musician, a pistol shooting instructor, and a freelance journalist before becoming a full-time writer. After spending several years in Italy and France, Scott discovered his secluded writer’s haven in the wilds of west Wales, an 1830s country house complete with rambling woodland and a secret passage. When he isn’t writing, Scott enjoys jazz, movies, classic motorcycles, and astronomy.

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The Mozart Conspiracy 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 42 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
International opera star Leigh Llewellyn sends a message to her former lover Ben Hope that she needs his help. A former SAS solider, Ben immediately visits Leigh. She explains her late brother Oliver who was Ben's friend was writing a biography of Mozart when he suddenly died in Austria under questionable circumstances. She fears for her life too as she thinks her sibling was murdered over the seemingly innocuous book. Though he doubts it is foul play, Ben agrees to protect Leigh. However, as he expected to rusticate with his ex lover, Ben revises his opinion when deadly mobsters try to kill them. Apparently the father of Leigh and Ben found a previously unknown Mozart letter dated just before the great composer died. In it Mozart accuses the secret Order of Ra members of odious deeds including assassinations and provoking war. This lethal cabal remains active with Ben and Leigh in their crosshairs for elimination. The latest Ben Hope thriller (see The Doomsday Prophecy and The Heretic's Treasure) is an exhilarating tale that is a cross between Dan Brown's Da Vinci Code, Harrison Gradwell Slater's Night Music and Dick Adler's The Mozart Code. The story line is fast-paced as Ben and Leigh struggle to stay alive while the deadly operatives of the Order of Ra want them dead. Harriet Klausner
Bob555 More than 1 year ago
Enertaining, a little romance, and enough action.
Zas More than 1 year ago
You already have the gist of the tale, or how it begins. You're thinking about it... Shall simply say "Go for it!" If you are old enough to know Ludlum in his glory days, or got swept up in "The DaVinci Code", you must read this. It is as fast paced as either of these two. His use of words, sometimes sparse, sometimes evocative, always as though you were 'seeing the movie', is well worth it. And his hero, Ben Hope- a mysterious man, with heart, flaws, and the knowledge of guns and fast moving vehiles we all want. I did get so drawn in that I wanted more. 'The Mozart Conspiracy is available in the U.S. in hardcover right now. But there are five other Ben Hope adventures, availlable as ebooks. In a month, I have read three, am on my fourth. Actually, reread two... These books are, as a colleague of mine might say, smart peoples fun. You learn much along the sdventures, and then you hang on to the adventure!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fast action, good plot. Good read
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MiltFL More than 1 year ago
Great book. Up there with Balducci and Silva
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A decent story that just seemed to drag the further into the book I got. Believe that the book is a good solid 3 stars and would recommend it, just not real strongly. Blood and guts sceens wdere not carried oit and the relationship (love scenes) just totally flopped.
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wolfe86 More than 1 year ago
Hated the ending of this book. Otherwise a well written and paced thriller for the most part... ish... I'm not against having the type of ending in this book, it just seemed obnoxiously unnecessary. Should have quit while he was ahead.
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Randy Carlton More than 1 year ago
Really great book