Mr. and Mrs. God in the Creation Kitchen
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Mr. and Mrs. God in the Creation Kitchen

3.0 2
by Nancy Wood, Timothy Basil Ering
     
 

What will this cosmic couple cook up next? Nancy Wood's lively take on how a duo of married chefs got all of us started is magically and hilariously brought to life through Timothy Basil Ering's extraordinary illustrations.

Deep in the heavens, in the space between the clouds, Mr. and Mrs. God are hard at work in their Creation Kitchen. They've got frying

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Overview

What will this cosmic couple cook up next? Nancy Wood's lively take on how a duo of married chefs got all of us started is magically and hilariously brought to life through Timothy Basil Ering's extraordinary illustrations.

Deep in the heavens, in the space between the clouds, Mr. and Mrs. God are hard at work in their Creation Kitchen. They've got frying pans and mixing bowls, beaters and whisks, and an oven big enough to roast a star - which is just what they are doing! After the sun and earth are finished, all kinds of interesting creations come next, with beaks and claws and growls and roars baked right in. When each creature is cooked to perfection, they set it down on Earth. But that's only the beginning. . . .

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Wood's (Old Coyote) irreverent recipe for a lively picture book about Creation begins with a married pair of doddering chefs (no strangers to smart remarks or the occasional argument) in their specially equipped Heavenly kitchen. As pots, pans, boxes of bones, canisters of eyeballs and "an oven big enough to roast a star" float about, Mr. and Mrs. God flit hither and yon, concocting various life forms. A large, hot, giant orb rolls out of the oven and becomes the sun. Mrs. God molds and bakes "a fat lump of dough" naming it Earth, inspiring Mr. God to whip up "some creatures to go with it." His monstrous first attempts-dinosaurs-are deemed a mistake, so Mr. God flings a red-hot coal down to them creating a "Ka-Boom!" effect. As the chefs fashion human forms out of leftover clay, Mrs. God wonders, "What are they?" Her husband replies, "Who knows?" Though Wood's lighthearted story posits what-if scenarios that some readers may find entertaining, fantasy and Bible story are an uncomfortable fit here and not likely to please readers of either genre. Ering's (illustrator of The Tale of Despereaux) predominantly gray ink-and-acrylic paintings, however, have an alluring, frenetic, mad-scientist energy. Young readers will have fun poring over the details of the kitchen equipment and the various creations. Ages 5-up. (Mar.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
This contemporary version, with humorous overtones, can be added to the many traditional creation stories from around the world. Mr. and Mrs. God are hard at work "in a space without beginning or end," in the Creation Kitchen, with pots, pans, bowls, and an oven "big enough to roast a star." Out of the oven they roll the sun. Then, when she is finished molding and baking, Mrs. God flings out into space a fiery ball she calls Earth. After it cools, Mr. God begins to form creatures. Together Mr. and Mrs. God finish them all, ending with two familiar-looking bipeds, wondering how they will turn out. "We'll just have to wait and see," is their conclusion. They must still be waiting and wondering. Ering fills the large, double-page scenes with action. Sketchy ink lines depict the creative couple, some of their creations, and the inventive machines in their messy kitchen. Acrylic paints, loosely applied, provide form and atmosphere. The scene of Mrs. God emptying a bowl of twisting fish into the sea is a glorious, multicolored extravaganza, while the following scene in which a huge pelican gulps them all up as God is scolded is impressively comic. The visual story is as daring and satisfying as the inventive text, which goes far beyond the basic Bible story. 2006, Candlewick Press, Ages 5 to 9.
—Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-This playful twist on a familiar theme finds the creative couple busy cooking up a storm. First out of the oven is a giant orb, bright and hot. "`I'm going to call it the sun,' Mr. God said." Then it's his wife's turn, naming the next fiery ball Earth, which she cools down by pouring some clouds over it. Now for the creatures, but the first are "enormous, ghastly things," a mistake, Mr. God decides, exploding them with a red-hot coal. "It's time for something beautiful," says Mrs. God and, filling a bowl with fins and tails and her favorite colors, she pours a multitude of sea creatures into Earth's blue waters. But her husband's next project, a huge flying thing, dives to the ocean and devours her handiwork in one gulp. "Mrs. God did not speak to Mr. God for a thousand years." Trying to get back into her good graces, he makes the biggest and most magnificent creature of all-a blue whale. And so it goes until, almost as an afterthought, the chefs form and bake a two-legged couple, who wander off into the world, leaving the bakers to wonder just how they'll turn out. Wood's text is clever and pleasant, though lacking the cadence of Phyllis Root's Big Momma Makes the World (Candlewick, 2003). The ink-and-acrylic illustrations are both soft and dynamic, with line drawings against a painted background that provide a good balance of the concrete and the amorphous. Tones of gray and blue predominate, but the richly colored picture of the sea creatures pouring from the bowl is a knockout.-Marie Orlando, Suffolk Cooperative Library System, Bellport, NY Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Another folksy take on the Biblical creation story from the publishers of Phyllis Root's Big Momma Makes the World (2003, illustrated by Helen Oxenbury). Here, Wood casts Mr. and Mrs. God as cooks with clashing styles; having made a massive sun, Mr. God enthusiastically assembles roaring monsters to populate Mrs. God's cool, smaller Earth. "They're hideous," she complains. "What were you thinking?" Mr. God obligingly blasts them out of existence, but then miffs Mrs. God again by creating a pelican ("Look at that beak!") that scoops up her colorful, just-decanted rainbow of fish. Opening with an empyrean kitchen full of pots bobbing around an oven "big enough to roast a star," and closing with two bare, decidedly Neanderthal-ish people rising up from a cookie sheet, Ering's full-bleed, broadly brushed scenes feature a pair of gnomish elders floating in space amidst kitchenware and bowls of animal parts. Not exactly canonical, but a lighthearted way to get young readers thinking about creation through collaborative effort. (Picture book. 7-9)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763612580
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
03/14/2006
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
407,502
Product dimensions:
10.64(w) x 12.13(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
5 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

NANCY WOOD has written a number of award-winning children's books, including OLD COYOTE and HOW THE TINY PEOPLE GREW TALL. She says, "I wanted to take a lighthearted look at Creation. Who says it has to be serious? Mr. and Mrs. God are having FUN!"

TIMOTHY BASIL ERING is the illustrator of THE TALE OF DESPEREAUX and the author-illustrator of THE STORY OF FROG BELLY RAT BONE. Of MR. AND MRS. GOD IN THE CREATION KITCHEN, he says, "The recipe for this book began with Nancy Wood's creative words. Then I added three bags of squiggly lines, a handful of complementary colors, 11 cups of loose brush strokes, 32 pieces of paper, and a 41-pound sack of imagination."

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Mr. and Mrs. God in the Creation Kitchen 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I happened to notice the book at a library in the children's department and I was taken back by the title , but being a firm believer in ' Don't judge a book by it's cover I decided to glance through it , and yet still found the book disappointing . I would NEVER read ' THAT' book to my child or any child for that matter .
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is not a serious book. Fundamentalists make take isssue with the idea of dual gods, but the author's objective seems to be to take the lid off convention. Fabulous illustrations, worth the book price alone. This will mae your youngsters smile.