Mr. Dalton's legatee, a very nice woman

Mr. Dalton's legatee, a very nice woman

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by Elizabeth Stone
     
 
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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER II. A few days afterwards Augustus went to keep his first term at Oxford, but he had not been gone above a fortnight, when his sisters were astonished to see him

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER II. A few days afterwards Augustus went to keep his first term at Oxford, but he had not been gone above a fortnight, when his sisters were astonished to see him burst into the little boudoir which had been tastefully fitted up for their especial use, and where they were now engaged in embroidering a pair of hand-screens, as an offering to Lady Marchmont on her entering, as she was almost immediately to do, an elegant house in Eaton Square. Augustus looked heated and flurried, as if he had travelled not only in haste, but on the spur of some pressing emergency. So it proved. Hardly replying to his sister's hurried salutations, and postponing sinS die, and with no superfluous elegance of diction their eager inquiries, he asked, " What sort of a temper madam was in this morn- ing." " Much as usual—very good : mamma's seldom out of temper." " Oh ! twaddle that; mamma never forgets her politeness, so the Brummagem all passes current for the solid with you. You are as innocent as babies, all of you." " I fear not," said Helena, laughing; " but without arrogating to myself mamma's claim to universal politeness, I must plead guilty to some of her ignorance of your language : you really should bring a dictionary with you." " Nonsense, Nell : don't be a fool; it don't become you ; and ape your fine ladyairs to please Mrs. de Snobyn, they are lost on me." " You are rude, Augustus, as well as cross ; but these manners and your sudden irruption lead me to suppose that you want more money. I have generally observed this amiable temper to be a prelude to your petitions for money." " Spoken like an oracle, Nelly: and now, tell me what chance I have of getting it ; or, rather, of getting it easily, for have it I must." " If you must have it, I should hope you...

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ISBN-13:
2940026969715
Publisher:
Stringer & Townsend
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
279 KB

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CHAPTER II. A few days afterwards Augustus went to keep his first term at Oxford, but he had not been gone above a fortnight, when his sisters were astonished to see him burst into the little boudoir which had been tastefully fitted up for their especial use, and where they were now engaged in embroidering a pair of hand-screens, as an offering to Lady Marchmont on her entering, as she was almost immediately to do, an elegant house in Eaton Square. Augustus looked heated and flurried, as if he had travelled not only in haste, but on the spur of some pressing emergency. So it proved. Hardly replying to his sister's hurried salutations, and postponing sinS die, and with no superfluous elegance of diction their eager inquiries, he asked, " What sort of a temper madam was in this morn- ing." " Much as usual very good : mamma's seldom out of temper." " Oh ! twaddle that; mamma never forgets her politeness, so the Brummagem all passes current for the solid with you. You are as innocent as babies, all of you." " I fear not," said Helena, laughing; " but without arrogating to myself mamma's claim to universal politeness, I must plead guilty to some of her ignorance of your language : you really should bring a dictionary with you." " Nonsense, Nell : don't be a fool; it don't become you ; and ape your fine ladyairs to please Mrs. de Snobyn, they are lost on me." " You are rude, Augustus, as well as cross ; but these manners and your sudden irruption lead me to suppose that you want more money. I have generally observed this amiable temper to be a prelude to your petitions for money." " Spoken like an oracle, Nelly: and now, tell me what chance I have of getting it ; or,rather, of getting it easily, for have it I must." " If you must have it, I should hope you...

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