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Mrs. Jeffries Stalks the Hunter (Mrs. Jeffries Series #19)
     

Mrs. Jeffries Stalks the Hunter (Mrs. Jeffries Series #19)

4.4 17
by Emily Brightwell
 

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Sir Edmund Leggett is flattered to be stalked by a young lady--who makes herself scarce after he's murdered in cold blood. The police hold the young woman to blame. But Inspector Witherspoon has other ideas and consults his housekeeper, Mrs. Jeffries--who always gets to the heart of the matter.

Overview

Sir Edmund Leggett is flattered to be stalked by a young lady--who makes herself scarce after he's murdered in cold blood. The police hold the young woman to blame. But Inspector Witherspoon has other ideas and consults his housekeeper, Mrs. Jeffries--who always gets to the heart of the matter.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781440622557
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/05/2004
Series:
Mrs. Jeffries Series , #19
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
90,910
File size:
399 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Emily Brightwell is the New York Times bestselling author of the Victorian Mystery series featuring Inspector Witherspoon and Mrs. Jeffries.

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Mrs. Jeffries Stalks the Hunter (Mrs. Jeffries Series #19) 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Another winner....Mrs. Jeffries and her "team" always do a great job.
Laurel_Blue More than 1 year ago
This story finds Mrs. Jeffries and her team at their best!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As with all of the Mrs Jeffries books, I really enjoyed this one. Once I started I could not put it down. Emily Brightwell has an interesting plot and a good sense of history.
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thimblemom More than 1 year ago
I'm entraced by Mrs. Jeffries and her staff. They show intuition and good sense when it comes to solving the mysteries. I would not hesitate to compare Emily Brightwell to Agatha Christie with layers of the story. My only complaint is that when I pick up and Mrs. Jefferies book, I want to read the entire book in one sitting.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In Victorian England, Sir Edmund Leggett is so in debt he is marrying heiress Beatrice Parkingtom for her money even with her parents in trade and the chit not wanting to marry him. A woman stalks Edmund hanging outside his home every day and follows him wherever he goes. Afraid that his cash cow will cry off if she learns about the stalker, Edmund announces their engagement at a society gala so she cannot dump him. Later a drunken Edmund heads home; someone he knows shoots him and calmly walks away leaving him dead.--- Inspector Gerald Witherspoon is assigned the case and finds too many suspects with motives as Sir Edmund played fast and loose with women, abused his servants, and was late paying off his gambling debts. Even his fiancée loathed him and the female stalker is assumed to have been one of the many women he discarded. The inspector worries that this will become a cold case, but his housekeeper Mrs. Jeffries and the rest of his household staff are helping him although he remains unaware of their assistance.--- The nineteenth installment in this long running series retains its fresh, unique ¿police procedural¿ premise due to a terrific who-done-it, the fabulous Witherspoon and his unofficial experts, and a solid secondary cast loaded with reasons to kill Edmund. Although his nasty behavior provides much of London as suspects, perhaps the only weak link is the odious Edmund, who was so nasty and hedonistic that no one cares that he died. However, what makes this well done who-done-it shine even brighter is the vivid look at Victorian England from the perspective of several lifestyles.--- Harriet Klausner