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Mrs. Watson Wants Your Teeth

( 6 )

Overview

Sure, first-grade teacher Mrs. Watson may look human, but she is actually a three-hundred-year-old alien who steals baby teeth from her students. Thank goodness for a second grader's warning, because this little first grader has a secret: She has a loose tooth! How will she make it through an entire year without opening her mouth?

A first grader is frightened on her first day of school after hearing a rumor that her teacher is a 300-year-old alien with a purple ...

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Overview

Sure, first-grade teacher Mrs. Watson may look human, but she is actually a three-hundred-year-old alien who steals baby teeth from her students. Thank goodness for a second grader's warning, because this little first grader has a secret: She has a loose tooth! How will she make it through an entire year without opening her mouth?

A first grader is frightened on her first day of school after hearing a rumor that her teacher is a 300-year-old alien with a purple tongue who steals baby teeth from her students.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Having tackled shoelace-tying and new-school jitters, the heroine from Countdown to Kindergarten (and Puddy, her cat) is back to start first grade-with a loose tooth. There's just one problem: a second-grader warns her that the first-grade teacher, Mrs. Watson, is a "three-hundred-year-old alien who steals baby teeth from her students." Once again making comical use of spot illustrations and thought balloons intermingled with the main narrative, Bliss conveys palpable fear on the heroine's face, as she looks for her teacher's telltale purple tongue, and shuns the treat box where the woman purportedly "keeps all those baby teeth." Fans will note McGhee's sly references to the first book ("Counting backwards from ten is my specialty! But wait. Keep... mouth... closed," reads the heroine's thought balloon when the teacher asks if anyone knows how), while Bliss fills the book with enough details for parents and kids to pore over (the Drama Club poster announces a production of Marathon Man, "a chilling tale of suspense and toothaches," a Book Fair poster advertises Harry Plotter and the Huge Cavity by J.K. Salinger"). A reassuring, humorous ending when the heroine's tooth finally does pop out in Mrs. Watson's classroom reminds readers that they must rely on their own experiences-not the say-so of others. Ages 4-7. (Aug.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Starting first grade has made our young narrator nervous enough. But she becomes even more apprehensive because a second-grader has told her that, "It's a known fact that Mrs. Watson, the first-grade teacher, is a three-hundred-year-old alien who steals baby teeth from her students." As the school bus wends its way to school, more terrifying information is relayed to our young heroine, who feels particularly vulnerable because she has a loose tooth. So through the day's activities her mouth remains firmly closed...until it pops out unexpectedly, and she finds out the happy truth. Smiles abound for readers throughout the text, told mostly in speech balloons and caption for vignettes. Ink and watercolor drawings describe the characters with only the minimum of props: bus, hallway with "toothy" posters, school desks. The children are cartoon-like in their representations, but they help move the comic adventure along with emotional effectiveness as they engage in typical behavior. Someone else's anxiety can be fun to see and may lessen one's own. The final triumphant smile warms the heart. 2004, Harcourt, Ages 4 to 7.
—Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2
Mrs. Watson, the first-grade teacher, is a 300-year-old alien with a purple tongue who steals baby teeth from her students. How does this new student know? A second grader enlightened her on the bus ride to her first day of school. Now she lives in terror because she has a loose tooth. Can she keep her mouth closed for the rest of the school year? This delightful book by Alison McGhee (Harcourt, 2004) is sure to have students giggling. Rachael Lillis reads the text (and pretty much every written word in the illustrations) with gusto and humor, creating a different voice for each character. Sound effects and background music enhance the text, as readers enjoy the humorous details of Harry Bliss's watercolor-and-ink illustrations. While some might have a little trouble with the concept of giving children candy as a reward for losing a tooth, this book is a sure-fire hit.
—Teresa BatemanCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-Stories from a "knowledgeable" second grader raise fears on the first day of school as the girl from Countdown to Kindergarten (Silver Whistle, 2002) again struggles to conquer the unknown. Does her first-grade teacher really have a purple tongue? Is she truly a 300-year-old alien? Does she crave earthling baby teeth? A natural first-person narrative, punctuated by speech-bubble thoughts and conversations, carries readers through a difficult experience. Tension mounts as the day wears on and the intrepid student keeps silent to conceal the wobbly evidence in her own mouth. McGhee has the pulse of this blue-ribbon worrier who is the prey of the school gossip and manipulator. Bliss's watercolor and black-ink illustrations feature distinctive, large-eyed classmates and a number of humorous toothy references on the walls in the hall and in the classroom.-Mary Elam, Forman Elementary School, Plano, TX Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
"[A] very fun mock thriller . . . Brilliant."—Kirkus Reviews
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781422367773
  • Publisher: DIANE Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 8/28/2007
  • Pages: 32
  • Product dimensions: 8.70 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

ALISON McGHEE is the author of three novels for adults as well as Snap, a teen novel. Countdown to Kindergarten, her first book for children, won the Minnesota Book Award. She lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

HARRY BLISS is an award-winning cartoonist and cover artist for The New Yorker, and also the illustrator of a number of picture books. His first, A Fine, Fine School by Sharon Creech, was a New York Times bestseller, as was Diary of a Worm by Doreen Cronin. He lives in Vermont.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 6 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2012

    gotta read it

    This is a great book for childs its funny and has good ilistracions




    by sophia

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2011

    We all enjoyed it!

    Cute story with fun illustrations. Something funny on every page,

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2008

    Mrs. Watson Wants Your Teeth

    Mrs. Watson Wants Your Teeth is a wonderful children's picture book about a young first grade girl who is going to the first day of school. On the school bus that morning she sat by a 2nd grader who begins to tell her that her teacher, Mrs. Watson, is really an alien from another planet who collects children's baby teeth from her classroom and uses them as pieces of jewelry. So throughout the first day of school this little girl is petrified. The teacher begins asking the children questions, and even though she knows all the answers she doesn't speak up because she is scared that the teacher is going to reach in and steal her teeth. Come to find out, the little girl does loose a tooth on the first day of class but the teacher isn't at all what the older kids cracked her up to be. Once the teacher sees that she has lost a tooth, she reaches into her goodie box and gives her a sucker. And for the jewelry that was supposedly made out of children teeth, it was actually pearls!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2004

    Your teacher is a 300-year-old-alien---oh my!

    WOW! McGhee sure knows how to triple the anxiety! Not only is it the first day of school, but the new teacher is a 300-year-old-alien with a purple tongue, who steals baby teeth and guess who has a loose tooth???? Our nameless heroine wonders whether she can keep her mouth closed for the entire school year! Opps! She opens her mouth in the classroom with hilarious results. The book is packed with speech balloons, thought bubbles, and funny posters on the school walls. Bliss uses black ink and watercolor illustrations which will keep youngsters going back for one more look at the students on the bus, in the hallways and in the classroom. One boy on the bus has tape across his mouth and another boy in the classroom is picking his nose (that will generate a large audience 'GROSS'). This story is a sure crowd pleaser. It is filled with laughs and it is filled with emotions students will recognize. Hurry and read it for storytime because it will always be checked out. This is a recommended purchase for both school and public libraries.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2004

    hysterical!

    This is a very funny read filled with many sight gags for kids and parents to pour over long after the story finishes. It's a book I'll enjoy reading more than once with my kids -- well done!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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