Much ADO about Nothing

( 48 )

Overview

This edition of Much Ado About Nothing, one of Shakespeare's most delightful and theatrically successful comedies, offers, along with a freshly edited text, an exceptionally helpful and critically aware Introduction and commentary. Paying particular attention in his Introduction to analysis of the play's minor characters, Sheldon P. Zitner discusses Shakespeare's social transformation of his source material, rethinking the attitudes to gender relations that underlie the comedy and determine its ruefully ...
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Much Ado about Nothing

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Overview

This edition of Much Ado About Nothing, one of Shakespeare's most delightful and theatrically successful comedies, offers, along with a freshly edited text, an exceptionally helpful and critically aware Introduction and commentary. Paying particular attention in his Introduction to analysis of the play's minor characters, Sheldon P. Zitner discusses Shakespeare's social transformation of his source material, rethinking the attitudes to gender relations that underlie the comedy and determine its ruefully optimistic view of marriage. Interpretations are advanced less because they are arguable than because they are actable. Allowing for the play's openness to re-interpretation by successive generations of readers and performers, the editor provides a socially analytic stage history. Full notes and commentary continue previous editors' work of clarifying textual and performance problems of interest to both readers and actors.

Presents the comedy of two couples who are happily united with the help of bumbling Constable Dogberry. Includes commentary on each page of the text.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
This entertaining retelling of the Shakespeare comedy includes extracts from the original text and is illustrated with expressive cartoon-like drawings. The story is preceded with an illustrated character list for easy reference. It is part of The Shakespeare Collection that includes retellings of Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, A Midsummer's Night Dream, Twelfth Night, Antony and Cleopatra, and The Tempest. The text of each book has been reviewed by Kathy Elgin of the Royal Shakespeare Company. The distinguished publisher, Oxford University Press, pegs the age range at 7 to 10. The publisher's web site says that these lively books make Shakespeare accessible to a young audience, sparking a lifelong interest in the Bard and his world. Although the text is quite readable, it seems unlikely to me that the specified age group would be interested in a tale of love, hate, and deception set in the far past. Isn't there a danger that children 10 and under may be turned off forever by a tale so irrelevant to them? The book would seem to be more useful for those who want a quick introduction or review of the plot, perhaps before seeing the play. 2002, Oxford University Press,
— Janet Crane Barley
School Library Journal
Gr 3-5-These series titles aim to make the Bard's words accessible via free-prose adaptations. The formulaic retellings convey the plot lines of two popular comedies, but all evidence of his poetic genius is missing. Instead, modern slang expressions and/or cliches, such as Toby Belch's complaining of Olivia's "mooching around gloomy rooms" and Andrew's dancing "like a drunken flamingo," replace Shakespeare's more fluid language, trivializing his words. The characters are all included, introduced through pictures at the beginning of each volume, but all but the two main ones remain completely two-dimensional, and the relationships among them are unclear. This is particularly true in Much Ado, a complicated story with incidental characters whose purpose in the play is difficult to discern. For instance, Conrad and Borachio suddenly appear, but there is little sense as to why they are part of the plot against Claudio. The cartoon watercolor renderings, alternating between black-and-white and color, vary from quarter- to half-page in size and suggest the style used by animators. Thus, while they do reinforce the stories, there is a sameness among them, adding to the lack of character development. In fact the characters' images could be interchanged, even between plays, without much confusion. These books are no substitute either for the originals or even for Marchette Chute's classic Stories from Shakespeare (World, 1956; o.p.).-Nancy Menaldi-Scanlan, LaSalle Academy, Providence, RI Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781444145892
  • Publisher: Hodder Education
  • Publication date: 3/28/2012
  • Edition description: Illustrate

Meet the Author

William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptised) - 23 April 1616) was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon". His extant works, including some collaborations, consist of about 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, the authorship of some of which is uncertain. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.
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Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
General Introduction 1
Much Ado About Nothing and the Romantic Comedies 1
Date 5
Sources 6
The Title 14
Place and Setting 16
Organizing the Dramatis Personae 18
Lovers 19
Brothers 38
Gentlewomen, Conspirators, and Others 42
Plot Construction 48
Act, Scene, and Pace 50
Contrasts and Links between Scenes 52
Local Effects 56
Stage History 58
From Text to Prompt-Book 70
Some Problems of Staging 72
Some Recent Directions 75
Textual Introduction 79
'Staying' and Publication 79
Setting the Text 80
'Ghosts' 81
Speech-Prefixes 82
Entrances and Exits 85
The Play in Folio 86
Editorial Procedures 88
Abbreviations and References 90
Much Ado About Nothing 93
Appendix: Music, Song, and Dance 203
Index 207
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 48 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(28)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(7)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 48 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2012

    Love it!!!

    This is a really good version of Much Ado About Nothing. I got a .99 ¿ version and it had a lot of typos in it but this one is magnificent! I am only twelve but I love it immensley. I highly recommend this this thrilling shakespearian story to anyone who loves a good novel with lots of big words (i'm really glad that Nook has a built-in dictionary!) Happy reading!

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2015

    OutCast

    She gave up, her legs unlocking under her. She collapsed into a heap of white fur and tears. With each breath, she fighted to breathe in. She thought she might pass out, and finally, she took in a single, shallow breath, sobbing the air back out. Memories flashed in her mind. Losing Redkit. Bravekit taken away. Silv. Tigerstrike. She was losing her ability to see, and breathed in another tiny breath. She could still feel the burns that night, when Redkit had been trapped in the nursery. She shouldn't have left him there. It was all she could focus on. She remembered being inches from his dy<_>ing body. She remembered the nightmares of seeing him. She remembered Lightless' d<_>ying breath, and cringed with pa<_>in. Again, she let oxygen drizzle into her lungs, thiugh still being crushed by her past.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2014

    I have a question

    OK. In the book Shakespears Secret by Elise broach, the reviews say that Hero and Beatrice are named after this play. But in the reviews by the people (besides people who bought this book) basically the publishers I read them and never heard Hero or Beatrice. So is it lying? HELP ME PLEASE?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2014

    Love

    Run for the hills!! We must run from this terrible athuor!!: (

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2013

    H

    Zys.m
    Ffggghkkk

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 18, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    Great classic that every literary mind should have the pleasure

    Great classic that every literary mind should have the pleasure of reading at least once in their life.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2013

    Love Shakespeare but....

    Why is this in Manga??

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2012

    A great book if you can under stand it.

    Awsome book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    Horrible

    This book made me lose my mind. Heres a tip: watch the movie instead

    0 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2004

    Much Ado About Nothing

    Much Ado is one of Shakespeare's greatest comedies. It is set in Italy and tells the love story and conflict that the four lovers must overcome in order to be wedded and united forever.THis stry will make you laugh and cry at the same time. It is a universal and timeless story for all.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2003

    Funny

    it was funny and i loved the charcters and everything that beatrice and benideck tell each other

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2003

    One of Shakespear's best comedies

    This is a great play. It's got all the elements for a great story, including the all important comic relief (taking the form of Beatrice and Benedict). It's the classic story of match-making with a twist. An evil villan is ploting to sabotage the happy couple. But you'll have to read it to see how it ends.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2002

    Awesome

    I really liked the book it help me with my reading level.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2002

    Masterful Manipulation!

    Many people are intimidated by Shakespeare's grammatical form, thou art⿝ and all those large words just confuse the normal reader. Do not be intimidated by Much Ado about Nothing, this play may have all the confusing words of Shakespeare, but I must say that it was very easy to understand and to read through, it keeps the reader very interested. The Characters, plot, and mood influence the story, conflicts, and resolutions. To start off, the characters effervescent personalities and attitudes helps to convey the idea of constant merriment. All except for, Don John, the antagonist of this play, he shows callousness for other's feelings and beliefs. He also can be called the foil of Don Pedro, his brother, one is mean while the other goes out of his way to help his friends. Then there's the issue of Benedick and Beatrice, two of the main characters, who have merry wars⿝ with each other, they insult each other because of their past when Benedick left Beatrice. All the Characters influence the story of Much Ado about Nothing by keeping their secrets, learning new secrets, and manipulating other characters to get what they want. Secondly, The Plot of Much Ado about nothing is influenced by manipulation and deception. Beatrice and Benedick are manipulated to fall in love. Don John uses deception to get Claudio to leave Hero. Just when one thinks that everything has fallen apart, one of the characters comes out with the truth and everything falls back the way it was going. The plot of this play is much different from any other plays that I have read in a long time. Finally, The mood of Much Ado about nothing is always merry, that's what I enjoyed the most, the cheery atmosphere. There was few moments in this play when someone was sad or upset. It was much different than the depressing moods of Hamlet, or Macbeth. The mood influenced the story by adding to the characterization of many of the characters, and also adding to the main conflict between Beatrice and Benedick. In conclusion, I strongly recommend this play to anyone, it is Masterfully written and an instant favorite. Though some of the words may throw the reader for a loop, stick with it, the main idea is very easy to catch on to!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2002

    Masterful Manipulations

    Many people are intimidated by Shakespeare¿s grammatical form, ¿thou art¿ all those bulky words leave the reader perplexed. Do not be intimidated by Much Ado about Nothing, this play may have countless confusing words, but I must say that it was extremely easy to understand and to read through, it kept me as a reader very interested. The Characters, plot, and mood influence the story, conflicts, and resolutions of Much Ado about Nothing. To start off, the characters effervescent personalities and demented attitudes help to convey the idea of constant merriment, and also add to the comedy in the play. All except for, Don John, the antagonist of this play, he shows callousness for other¿s feelings and beliefs. He also could be considered the foil of Don Pedro, his brother; one was mean, while the other goes out of his way to help his friends find their loved ones and get married. Then there was the issue of Benedick and Beatrice, two of the main characters, who have ¿merry wars¿ with each other, they insult each other because of their past when Benedick left Beatrice. All the Characters influence the story of Much Ado about Nothing by keeping their secrets, learning new secrets, and manipulating other characters to get what they want. Secondly, manipulation and deception influence the plot of Much Ado about nothing. Beatrice and Benedick are manipulated to fall in love. Don John used deception to get Claudio to leave Hero in stead of marrying her. Just when one thought that everything has fallen apart, one of the characters comes out with the truth and everything falls back the way it was going. The plot of this play is much different from any other plays that I have read in a long time. Lowmaster 2 Finally, The mood of Much Ado about nothing was always merry, that was what I enjoyed the most, the cheery atmosphere. There were few moments in this play when someone was sad or upset. It was much different than the depressing moods of Hamlet, or Macbeth. The mood influenced the story by adding to the characterization of many of the characters, and also adding to the main conflict between Beatrice and Benedick. If the mood was any different, it might be thought that the two characters loathed each other, instead of secretly being in love with one another. In conclusion, I strongly recommend this play to anyone, it is Masterfully written and an instant favorite. Though some of the words may throw the reader for a loop, stick with it, the main idea was very easy to catch on to, also very enjoyable, and a great read!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2000

    Way good!!!

    it is the greatest book ever!!!Beaitrice and Benidict are great caraecters!!!I love it!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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