Much Ado about Nothing (Bantam Classic)

Overview

Set in a courtly world of masked revels and dances, this play turns on the archetypal story of a lady falsely accused of unfaithfulness, spurned by her bridegroom, and finally vindicated and reunited with him. Villainy, schemes, and deceits threaten to darken the brilliant humor and sparkling wordplay–but the hilarious counterplot of a warring couple, Beatrice and Benedick, steals the scene as the two are finally tricked into admitting their ...

See more details below
Paperback (Mass Market Paperback)
$4.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (69) from $1.99   
  • New (9) from $1.99   
  • Used (60) from $1.99   
Much Ado about Nothing (Bantam Classic)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$4.99
BN.com price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

Set in a courtly world of masked revels and dances, this play turns on the archetypal story of a lady falsely accused of unfaithfulness, spurned by her bridegroom, and finally vindicated and reunited with him. Villainy, schemes, and deceits threaten to darken the brilliant humor and sparkling wordplay–but the hilarious counterplot of a warring couple, Beatrice and Benedick, steals the scene as the two are finally tricked into admitting their love for each other in Shakespeare’s superb comedy of manners.

Each Edition Includes:
• Comprehensive explanatory notes
• Vivid introductions and the most up-to-date scholarship
• Clear, modernized spelling and punctuation, enabling contemporary readers to understand the Elizabethan English
• Completely updated, detailed bibliographies and performance histories
• An interpretive essay on film adaptations of the play, along with an extensive filmography

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for William Shakespeare: Complete Works:

“A feast of literary and historical information.”
—The Wall Street Journal

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553213010
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/28/1988
  • Series: Bantam Classics Series
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 364,222
  • Product dimensions: 4.19 (w) x 6.87 (h) x 0.64 (d)

Meet the Author

William Shakespeare was born in Stratford-upon-Avon in April 1564, and his birth is traditionally celebrated on April 23. The facts of his life, known from surviving documents, are sparse. He was one of eight children born to John Shakespeare, a merchant of some standing in his community. William probably went to the King’s New School in Stratford, but he had no university education. In November 1582, at the age of eighteen, he married Anne Hathaway, eight years his senior, who was pregnant with their first child, Susanna. She was born on May 26, 1583. Twins, a boy, Hamnet ( who would die at age eleven), and a girl, Judith, were born in 1585. By 1592 Shakespeare had gone to London working as an actor and already known as a playwright. A rival dramatist, Robert Greene, referred to him as “an upstart crow, beautified with our feathers.” Shakespeare became a principal shareholder and playwright of the successful acting troupe, the Lord Chamberlain’s Men (later under James I, called the King’s Men). In 1599 the Lord Chamberlain’s Men built and occupied the Globe Theater in Southwark near the Thames River. Here many of Shakespeare’s plays were performed by the most famous actors of his time, including Richard Burbage, Will Kempe, and Robert Armin. In addition to his 37 plays, Shakespeare had a hand in others, including Sir Thomas More and The Two Noble Kinsmen, and he wrote poems, including Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece. His 154 sonnets were published, probably without his authorization, in 1609. In 1611 or 1612 he gave up his lodgings in London and devoted more and more time to retirement in Stratford, though he continued writing such plays as The Tempest and Henry VII until about 1613. He died on April 23 1616, and was buried in Holy Trinity Church, Stratford. No collected edition of his plays was published during his life-time, but in 1623 two members of his acting company, John Heminges and Henry Condell, put together the great collection now called the First Folio.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 46 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2002

    The Empire Lives On!

    Die hard Star Trek fans can apreciate the complexity of this book and the great efforts put into the whole translation. For the first time Federation readers can apreciate Wil'yam Shex'pIr in his original Klingon text, the way it was and is meant to be. No longer will Terrans be blinded by the Federation forgery of this great Klingon playwright. qo'mey poSmoH Hol ~ Language opens worlds

    2 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2001

    Look Hero And Claudio Were Great

    Hi all, Look this is more than likely my favorite play. I loved ALL OF THE PEOPLE! but honestly Claudio got no respect. He only knew Hero for one week. How was he supposed to know about her morals when all he had were others courting her. Benedick and Beatrice were just exquisite. And Hero was a true maiden lady. Love conquers all.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2004

    This book was great it was magical!

    This book grab me it made me keep on reading till I finshed the book without putting it down. I have one word for this book WOW!

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2000

    Beautiful Play!

    This is one of the best plays that I have ever read. It is truly beautiful. I'ld have to say that Shakespeare is the best play writer that ever lived. His grammar makes his plays unique and different from others. I love all the books that he wrote.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

    Oye !

    Vjhhh

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    So Helpful

    The annotations really helped with some of the outdated words and references that Shakespeare used.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 23, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Shakespeare...Hero

    William Shakespeare Much Ado about Nothing is one of the many comedy of Shakespeares. I really enjoyed this book alot, I didnt find it much humerous but I did enjoy it. Especially, the character Hero.

    Much Ado about Nothing is a book about a young Lord of Florence name Claudio who falls in love with a girl name Hero. And about a young Lord of Pandua name Benedick who is trick and believing that he is in love with Beatrice(Leonato niece).Benedick and Beatrice both believed almost immediately that what they had overheard their friends saying in the garden was correct and completely true. Neither person decided to test what they had heard. To see if what was said was true. Because both did not check to see if the information they heard was correct, everything worked out. Both assumed what they had heard was true and acted on it. There were no visible consequences. What a mess you would have if Benedick decided that what he had overheard could not possibly be true. Beatrice would have made a fool out of herself while thinking that Benedick felt the same way. The same could be said the other way around.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2005

    Much Ado About Nothing

    Much Ado About Nothing is a great book. When I started reading this book it was for my Language Arts class so I thought, 'This is going to be another boring story that everyone will hate but the teacher.' I had never read Shakespeare before, so the Folger Library Edition helped me a ton by providing definitions to words and phrases every other page. When I was through the first act, I was so interested in the plot that I read the book for pleasure more than for my class. Anyone with a high reading level will enjoy Much Ado About Nothing because it has everything from comedy and marrige to evil plans and mischief. Much Ado About Nothing is rich in meaning and themes. You will have to ponder about the many themes that run throughout the story. Much Ado About Nothing should definently be read by anyone who wants a great read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2005

    And thus far it was, in all forms, good. With all due respect that thus it deserved.

    This book is really entertaining. Although i have yet to completely finish the story. As the plot develps and the characters motives become clear to the reader, it turns into a really enjoyable read for all highschool and some special middle school students. Although the language of the Shakesperian time is difficult to comprehend and understand, the Floger Library Edition provides excellent and understandable plot synopsies and definitions for all the unclear words and ancient english language. This book is not only rich in text, but it is rich in meaning as well. Some may find it really interesting and entertaining that the friends of two absentminded lovers would get tehm to hook up. But then again, some might find pleasure in the destroying of the wedding that takes place at the beginning of the novel. This book was not only a joy to read, but it was also a joy to discuss and will keep you laughing for hours at Dogberry and the gang.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2005

    Much Ado About Nothing

    Much Ado About Nothing is one of the 'forgotten' Shakespearean Plays that lies in the shadows of Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet and A Midsummer's Night's Dream. Being a comedy it is somewhat relieving to know that it has a happy ending. It starts out when Don Pedro's army returns from a victory to Messina. Leonato, Messina's governor, agrees to let Don pedro's army stay in his town for a week. Claudio, a young warrior who performed valiantly in the war, falls in love with Leonato's daughter, Hero. While Claudio tries to win the heart of Hero, Benedick and Beatrice engage in a clash of wit. They both swear never to marry and persistently hate each other. Claudio, with the help of Don Pedro, wins Hero and they are set to marry. Don Pedro comes up with the idea of trying to get Beatirce and Benedick to fall in love with each other. Don Pedro's brother, Don John, wants to break up the marriage of Hero and Claudio so he and his servant, Borachio, devise a plan to fool Claudio. It ends like a typical Shakespearean Comedy and is somewhat interesting. Note: This book is not for the average person who wants to upgrade his/her Shakespearean vocabulary. It will be boring unless you go into it thingking that it is written like a play.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2000

    Beautifully Written.

    Well, Shakespeare has done it again. Much Ado About Nothing is one of my favorite plays. The excitement, tension, mischevious and duplitous schemes, backstabbing, treachery, and suspense just makes you want to continue reading. Great book. GO READ IT PEOPLE!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 46 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)