Much Ado about You (Essex Sisters Series #1) [NOOK Book]

Overview

When you're the oldest daughter, you don't get to have any fun!

Witty, orphaned Tess Essex faces her duty: marry well and marry quickly, so she can arrange matches for her three sisters -- beautiful Annabel, romantic Imogen and practical Josie. After all, right now they're under the rather awkward guardianship of the perpetually tipsy Duke of Holbrook. But just when she begins to think that all might end well, one of her sisters bolts with a ...

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Much Ado about You (Essex Sisters Series #1)

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Overview

When you're the oldest daughter, you don't get to have any fun!

Witty, orphaned Tess Essex faces her duty: marry well and marry quickly, so she can arrange matches for her three sisters -- beautiful Annabel, romantic Imogen and practical Josie. After all, right now they're under the rather awkward guardianship of the perpetually tipsy Duke of Holbrook. But just when she begins to think that all might end well, one of her sisters bolts with a horse-mad young lord, and her own fiancé just plain runs away.

Which leaves Tess contemplating marriage to the sort of man she wishes to avoid -- one of London's most infamous rakes. Lucius Felton is a rogue whose own mother considers him irredeemable! He's delicious, Annabel points out. And he's rich, Josie notes. But although Tess finally consents to marry him, it may be for the worst reason of all. Absurd as she knows it to be, she may have fallen utterly in love . . .

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Reviewers have compared James's Regency-era romances (Your Wicked Ways, etc.) to Sex and the City, but her effervescent voice is somewhat subdued in this first installment of her new series, focusing on four squabbling sisters. After their father passes away, Tess, Imogen, Annabel and Josie Essex find themselves impoverished, uprooted and taken under the wing of a benevolent duke. As the eldest and most sensible, Tess decides she must marry so that she can help support her sisters. But who should she wed? Garret Langham, an earl who seems to admire, though not lust after, her? Or the untitled but ber-wealthy Lucius Felton, who hides his emotions behind a mask of cool civility, save for when he kisses her? Tess is mildly conflicted but generally content to go along with whatever fate throws her way, which makes her a less than inspiring heroine. What she lacks in character is more than made up for by Lucius, however, who possesses a quiet intensity and magnetic presence. The chemistry between the two easily overshadows the rather tenuous camaraderie that Tess and her sisters share. Sex and the City gals they are not; they bicker constantly and rarely connect on a sisterly or even friendly level. But though the book isn't as spry as James's earlier novels, it contains a romance that will induce sighs of satisfaction. Agent, Kim Witherspoon. (Jan.) Forecast: James will be receiving plenty of publicity at the start of '05, when she reveals her true identity as Mary Bly, a professor of Shakespeare at Fordham University. A booking on CNN American Morning and spotlights in various newspapers, including the Wall Street Journal, will help ensure that the book sells a decent portion of its 500,000 first printing. For more on James's "coming out," see Book News, Dec. 13. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061797545
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/13/2009
  • Series: Essex Sisters Series , #1
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 21,040
  • File size: 765 KB

Meet the Author

Eloisa James

Eloisa James is a USA Today and New York Times bestselling author and professor of English literature, who lives with her family in New York but can sometimes be found in Paris or Italy. (Her husband is an honest-to-goodness Italian knight!) Eloisa's website offers short stories, extra chapters, and even a guide to shopping in Florence.

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Read an Excerpt

Much ADO about You


By James, Eloisa

Avon Books

ISBN: 0060732067

Chapter One

September 1816
Holbrook Court, seat of the Duke of Holbrook
On the outskirts of Silchester

In the afternoon

"I am happy to announce that the rocking horses have been delivered, Your Grace. I have placed them in the nursery for your inspection. As yet, there is no sign of the children."

Raphael Jourdain, Duke of Holbrook, turned. He had been poking a fire smoldering in the cavernous fireplace of his study. There was a reserved tone in his butler's voice that signaled displeasure. Or perhaps it would be more accurate to say that Brinkley's tone signaled the disgruntlement of the entire household of elderly servants, not one of whom was enchanted by the idea of accommodating themselves to the presence of four small, female children. Well, the hell with that, Rafe thought. It wasn't as if he'd asked to have a passel of youngsters on the premises.

"Rocking horses?" came a drawling voice from a deep chair to the right of the fireplace. "Charming, Rafe. Charming. One can't start too early making the little darlings interested in horseflesh." Garret Langham, the Earl of Mayne, raised his glass toward his host. His black curls were in exquisite disarray, his comments arrogant to a fault, and his manners barely hid a seething fury. Not that he was furious at Rafe; Mayne had been in a slow burn for the past few months. "To Papa and his brood of infantequestriennes," he added, tossing back his drink.

"Stubble it!" Rafe said, but without much real animosity. Mayne was a damned uncomfortable companion at the moment, what with his poisonous comments and black humor. Still, one had to assume that the foul temper caused by the shock of being rejected by a woman would wear off in a matter of time.

"Why the plural, as in rocking horses?" Mayne asked. "As I recall, most nurseries contain only one rocking horse."

Rafe took a gulp of his brandy. "I don't know much about children," he said, "but I distinctly remember my brother and me fighting over our toys. So I bought four of them."

There was a second's silence during which the earl considered whether to acknowledge the fact that Rafe obviously still missed his brother (dead these five years, now). He dismissed the impulse. Manlike, he observed no bene- fit to maudlin conversation.

"You're doing those orphans proud," he said instead. "Most guardians would stow the children out of sight. It's not as if they're your blood."

"There's no amount of dolls in the world that will make up for their situation," Rafe said, shrugging. "Their father should have thought of his responsibilities before he climbed on a stallion."

The conversation was getting dangerously close to the sort of emotion to be avoided at all costs, so Mayne sprang from his chair. "Let's have a look at the rocking horses, then. I haven't seen one in years."

"Right," Rafe said, putting his glass onto the table with a sharp clink. "Brinkley, if the children arrive, bring them upstairs, and I'll receive them in the nursery."

A few minutes later the two men stood in the middle of a large room on the third floor, dizzily painted with murals. Little Bo Peep chased after Red Riding Hood, who was surely in danger of being crushed by the giant striding across the wall, his raised foot lowering over a feather bed sporting a huge green pea under the coverlet. The room resembled nothing so much as a Bond Street toy shop. Four dolls with spun gold hair sat primly on a bench. Four doll beds were propped atop each other, next to four doll tables, on which sat four jack-in-the-boxes. In the midst of it all was a group of rocking horses graced with real horsehair and coming almost to a man's waist.

"Jesus," Mayne said.

Rafe strode into the room and stamped on the rocker of one of the horses, making it clatter back and forth on the wooden floor. A door on the side of the room swung open, and a plump woman in a white apron poked her head out.

"There you are, Your Grace," she said, beaming. "We're just waiting for the children. Would you like to meet the new maids now?"

"Send them on in, Mrs. Beeswick."

Four young nursemaids crowded into the room after her. "Daisy, Gussie, Elsie, and Mary," said the nanny. "They're from the village, Your Grace, and pleased to have a position at Holbrook Court. We're all eager for the little cherubs to arrive." The nursemaids lined up to either side of Mrs. Beeswick, smiling and curtsying.

"Jesus," Mayne repeated. "They won't even share a maid, Rafe?"

"Why should they? My brother and I had three nurses between us."

"Three?"

"Two for my brother, ever since he turned duke at age seven, and one for me."

Mayne snorted. "That's absurd. When's the last time you met your wards' father, Lord Brydone?"

"Not for years," Rafe said, picking up a jack-in-the-box and pressing the lever so that it hopped from its box with a loud squeak. "The arrangement was just a matter of a note from him and my reply."

"You have never met your own wards?"

"Never. I haven't been over the border in years, and Brydone only came down for the Ascot, the Silchester, and, sometimes, Newmarket. To be honest, I don't think he really gave a damn for anything other than his stables. He didn't even bother to list his children in Debrett's. Of course, since he had four girls, there was no question of inheritance. The estate went to some distant cousin."

"Why on earth—" Mayne glanced at the five women standing to the side of the room and checked himself.

"He asked me," Rafe said, shrugging. "I didn't think twice of it. Apparently Monkton had been in line, but he cocked up his toes last year ... Continues...


Excerpted from Much ADO about You by James, Eloisa Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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First Chapter

Much Ado About You

Chapter One

September 1816
Holbrook Court, seat of the Duke of Holbrook
On the outskirts of Silchester

In the afternoon

"I am happy to announce that the rocking horses have been delivered, Your Grace. I have placed them in the nursery for your inspection. As yet, there is no sign of the children."

Raphael Jourdain, Duke of Holbrook, turned. He had been poking a fire smoldering in the cavernous fireplace of his study. There was a reserved tone in his butler's voice that signaled displeasure. Or perhaps it would be more accurate to say that Brinkley's tone signaled the disgruntlement of the entire household of elderly servants, not one of whom was enchanted by the idea of accommodating themselves to the presence of four small, female children. Well, the hell with that, Rafe thought. It wasn't as if he'd asked to have a passel of youngsters on the premises.

"Rocking horses?" came a drawling voice from a deep chair to the right of the fireplace. "Charming, Rafe. Charming. One can't start too early making the little darlings interested in horseflesh." Garret Langham, the Earl of Mayne, raised his glass toward his host. His black curls were in exquisite disarray, his comments arrogant to a fault, and his manners barely hid a seething fury. Not that he was furious at Rafe; Mayne had been in a slow burn for the past few months. "To Papa and his brood of infant equestriennes," he added, tossing back his drink.

"Stubble it!" Rafe said, but without much real animosity. Mayne was a damned uncomfortable companion at the moment, what with his poisonous comments and black humor. Still, one had to assume that the foul temper caused by the shock of being rejected by a woman would wear off in a matter of time.

"Why the plural, as in rocking horses?" Mayne asked. "As I recall, most nurseries contain only one rocking horse."

Rafe took a gulp of his brandy. "I don't know much about children," he said, "but I distinctly remember my brother and me fighting over our toys. So I bought four of them."

There was a second's silence during which the earl considered whether to acknowledge the fact that Rafe obviously still missed his brother (dead these five years, now). He dismissed the impulse. Manlike, he observed no bene- fit to maudlin conversation.

"You're doing those orphans proud," he said instead. "Most guardians would stow the children out of sight. It's not as if they're your blood."

"There's no amount of dolls in the world that will make up for their situation," Rafe said, shrugging. "Their father should have thought of his responsibilities before he climbed on a stallion."

The conversation was getting dangerously close to the sort of emotion to be avoided at all costs, so Mayne sprang from his chair. "Let's have a look at the rocking horses, then. I haven't seen one in years."

"Right," Rafe said, putting his glass onto the table with a sharp clink. "Brinkley, if the children arrive, bring them upstairs, and I'll receive them in the nursery."

A few minutes later the two men stood in the middle of a large room on the third floor, dizzily painted with murals. Little Bo Peep chased after Red Riding Hood, who was surely in danger of being crushed by the giant striding across the wall, his raised foot lowering over a feather bed sporting a huge green pea under the coverlet. The room resembled nothing so much as a Bond Street toy shop. Four dolls with spun gold hair sat primly on a bench. Four doll beds were propped atop each other, next to four doll tables, on which sat four jack-in-the-boxes. In the midst of it all was a group of rocking horses graced with real horsehair and coming almost to a man's waist.

"Jesus," Mayne said.

Rafe strode into the room and stamped on the rocker of one of the horses, making it clatter back and forth on the wooden floor. A door on the side of the room swung open, and a plump woman in a white apron poked her head out.

"There you are, Your Grace," she said, beaming. "We're just waiting for the children. Would you like to meet the new maids now?"

"Send them on in, Mrs. Beeswick."

Four young nursemaids crowded into the room after her. "Daisy, Gussie, Elsie, and Mary," said the nanny. "They're from the village, Your Grace, and pleased to have a position at Holbrook Court.We're all eager for the little cherubs to arrive." The nursemaids lined up to either side of Mrs. Beeswick, smiling and curtsying.

"Jesus," Mayne repeated. "They won't even share a maid, Rafe?"

"Why should they? My brother and I had three nurses between us."

"Three?"

"Two for my brother, ever since he turned duke at age seven, and one for me."

Mayne snorted. "That's absurd. When's the last time you met your wards' father, Lord Brydone?"

"Not for years," Rafe said, picking up a jack-in-the-box and pressing the lever so that it hopped from its box with a loud squeak. "The arrangement was just a matter of a note from him and my reply."

"You have never met your own wards?"

"Never. I haven't been over the border in years, and Brydone only came down for the Ascot, the Silchester, and, sometimes, Newmarket. To be honest, I don't think he really gave a damn for anything other than his stables. He didn't even bother to list his children in Debrett's. Of course, since he had four girls, there was no question of inheritance. The estate went to some distant cousin."

"Why on earth—" Mayne glanced at the five women standing to the side of the room and checked himself.

"He asked me," Rafe said, shrugging. "I didn't think twice of it. Apparently Monkton had been in line, but he cocked up his toes last year ...

Much Ado About You. Copyright © by Eloisa James. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 52 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(19)

4 Star

(13)

3 Star

(14)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 52 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 2, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Fun Romance

    I enjoyed this Regency romance despite it being a variety of the marriage of convenience trope. The style wasn't bad in romance terms--not flowery or purple anyway even if with the too often seen point of view glitches. I liked the period detail, literary allusions and how life among the horsey set figured in. The author says it was inspired by Little Women and I could see that in the way the four Scottish sisters featured in the novel; they felt like sisters in how they interacted and each had a distinct personality. It was refreshing to read a romance novel where the heroine had important relationships with other women. First book in a series about the sisters. Not sure I'll ever look the rest up.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2005

    in between.

    I would have liked to mark this a 4 star book but it fell a little short towards the end. I thought the book was great and moved along at a great pace until the end. There it just sota flew by. I would have liked to know what happened between Tess and her sister Imogen between her leaving the funeral and having two kids. I mean they made a big deal out of the fact that her sisters where going to go to london and live with her after things settles with Imogen, well did they go or not? I also don't like the fact that I have to wait a year to find out what happens to her other sisters. I have read other books by Eloisa James and have enjoyed them all and will continue to read her but I am hoping she writes the other books alittle differently. Oh one last thing can't wait to see if she writes another book about Imogen and if so how she explains her behavior.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2013

    Ok

    Ilike this author, have loved some of her books. This one was ok, slow to get going, hard to warm up to. I liked the sisters and was intrigued by their story, but the male lead was hard to warm up to. Pretty bland storyline, overall forgettable.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 12, 2012

    Very slow...not one of her best !

    Its ok ...felt was too slow and i read excessively! Not one of her best! She has written better! ....best wishes!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 30, 2012

    Best in the series!

    I luv it. For me it's the best in the series! A definite re-Read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 21, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    When does the story begin?

    This is my first novel by this author, I must admit maybe I should have chosen a different novel for my first impression. The story evolves around the distinctive personalities and the interactive relationship of Tess Essex (eldest) and her three sisters. After the death of their beloved horsemad father they are sent to live with the Duke of Holbrooke. Tess being sensible is face with the duty to marry so that her sisters can arrange perfect matches among London society. Although the period details were entertaining, I felt that I was reading a romance drama that had no beginning, middle, or end. Ms. James inspiration for this novel is from 'Little Women' a classic but boring as well. Maybe the next book within the series will be better.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 16, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Eloise James is my new favorite period romance writer-perfect for an afternoon escape!

    This book is a continuation of her other "Duke" books so if you've read some of the others you'll love picking up where they left off. I love her writting style, very enjoyable read. I finished this book in 1 day because I just couldn't put it down!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 16, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    1st in the Series

    I found this book at the library and thought "why not" because I've read several of her other books and was pleasantly entertained. I actually really liked the two main characters and didn't mind the whole tragicness of Dravin dying. Overall...good.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Much Ado About Nothing

    I read a lot of romance and have recently discovered Eloisa James. I have been ravenously reading through her older works and loving all her novels.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2009

    A little slow...

    I enjoyed the book, but I felt like it was pretty slow in the beginning and introduced unnecessary plot lines. I loved Lucious and Tess. Could've done without Imogen and all her drama though. All in all good book, if you can withstand unnecessary details leading up to the main points. Can't wait to read the other sister's stories!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2005

    Odd Man Out

    It looks like I'm the only one who enjoyed this book. I actually read it twice! The first time through I admit I felt somewhat at a loss about some of the character's actions and motivations. Between readings, I happened to pick up 'The One that got Away' from the library. I had no idea that Lucius Felton was featured in Eloisa James' story for this collection, and got a real kick out of seeing a 'different side' to him. I had to re-read 'Much Ado' after that and see him in a different light. For 'Much Ado', I also enjoyed seeing the Earl of Mayne again, after reading 'Your Wicked Ways' (the only other James book I've read). I love when characters show up in other books, so that might be one reason I liked it. I also did not detest Imogen to the extent that some readers obviously did. I understood her jealousy and unhappiness and will be interested in seeing her story in the future. She needs to grow up, but I think she is basically a good person. Annabel's story should be good too. I hope there's someone out there for Mayne, too!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2005

    I wasnt cool with it at all!

    I believe she's a brilliant author but the book is just killing, in as much I love reading but this book doesnt just fit in. It needs more closure and the storyline needs to be more cohesive. I dont think I'd read any more book from the author though

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2005

    Could have been better

    Have enjoyed her previous books immensely, but was somewhat disappointed this time. Story did not have its usual kick. Jumps around amongst the sisters with no real direction. Who gets married only a few days after meeting total strangers. Hope the next book has more depth.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2005

    It was OK

    This is the first book by Ms. James that I've read. I would have liked the book better if there was more closure to the situation with Lucius's parents. I also hated Imogen. I don't know if I'll read any more of her books.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2005

    good read, but....

    The main characters and most of the secondary characters are engaging and interesting. I like the way the main character's relationships with her sisters impact her own story. However, there are several story points that are lifted right out of Jane Austen novels and one that is lifted out of Louisa May Alcott. This is not to the benefit of the book. Perhaps more troubling for the series is that one of the sisters is purely obnoxious. Not just obnoxious but thoroughly despicable. I don't want to read a book where I'm supposed to root for this spoiled brat of a character. It's likely that I won't be buying Imogen's story. The author will likely excuse Imogen's behavior or pretend that her behavior is not a real indicator of her personality. Imogen's entire subplot, while pivotal to this story, rendered both Imogen and her husband disgusting and uninteresting. It's a real weakness in the series. This is the first character in any of James' series that I just found to be base, low and unlikeable

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    terrific historical romance

    In 1816 Duke Raphael Jourdain buys four rocking horses so that the orphan sisters that recently became his wards would not fight over toys like he and his brother used to do. He hires a nanny and four nursemaids to care for the children, whom he never met. The quartet arrives to a nursery filled with toys. The oldest Teresa thinks that men will be boys, but a shocked Rafe apologizes for his misconception. Tess introduces her younger siblings (fifteen years old Josie, twenty years old Imogen, and twenty-two years old Annabel).--- While Rafe drinks too much brandy, Tess realizes she must marry off her siblings; each one¿s dowry is a renowned racing horse so she figures if men are like her father, besotted with steeds only, she should have no trouble finding a suitor for each of them. However, instead she finds an unsuitable rake for herself as Tess falls in love with Lucius Felton, disowned by his family for his unbecoming of a lord behavior.--- This is a terrific historical romance that showcases family living in Regency England. The story line predominantly plays out as Tess and her sisters display love and support for one another. On the other hand, Lucius is fabulous as he tries to gain entry into the sisterhood although his reputation as being barred by his parents precedes him; his family relationships are the opposite of the sisterhood especially with his peerage mother. The final discovery by Tess and readers of the cause of his estrangement tells a lot about the times in a few sentences. Fans will appreciate this strong tale that much ado about fantastic writing.--- Harriet Klausner

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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