Mujercitas (Little Women)

Mujercitas (Little Women)

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by Louisa May Alcott
     
 

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Este es un libro que raro será encontrar una mujer que no lo haya leído, sea joven o mayor. Mujercitas es más que un clásico, que ha sido llevado al cine y a la TV en más de una ocasión y que narra las aventuras de las cuatro hijas de la familia March, Meg, Jo, Beth y Amy en un soberbio retrato de la vida americana, en la segunda

Overview

Este es un libro que raro será encontrar una mujer que no lo haya leído, sea joven o mayor. Mujercitas es más que un clásico, que ha sido llevado al cine y a la TV en más de una ocasión y que narra las aventuras de las cuatro hijas de la familia March, Meg, Jo, Beth y Amy en un soberbio retrato de la vida americana, en la segunda mitad del siglo XIX, con el que tuvo tanto éxito que publica la continuación en 1869. La obra tiene tintes autobiográficos de la autora, que se basó en sus padres, sus hermanas, sus amigos de Nueva-Inglaterra y de Europa. Las cuatro hermanas realizan un aprendizaje, a veces doloroso, a veces fascinante, de la vida y del amor. Van creciendo y abandonando, una a una, el hogar familiar para casarse y crear sus propias familias. Sólo se queda Jo, que quiere ser escritora. A pesar de la sensación que tiene de que ya ha terminado su tiempo de felicidad, sigue escribiendo y consigue publicar su primera obra.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9788495311160
Publisher:
Mestas, Jorge A. Ediciones Escolares La Escuela Nueva y Alin
Publication date:
01/31/2004
Edition description:
Spanish-language Edition
Age Range:
9 - 17 Years

Read an Excerpt

Mujercitas / Little Women


By Louisa May Alcott

AIMS International Books

Copyright © 0001 Louisa May Alcott
All right reserved.

ISBN: 849531116X

Chapter One

Playing Pilgrims


"Christmas won't be Christmas without any presents,"grumbled Jo, lying on the rug.

"It's so dreadful to be poor!"sighed Meg, looking down at her old dress.

"I don't think it's fair for some girls to have lots of pretty things, and other girls nothing at all," added little Amy, with an injured sniff.

"We've got father and mother, and each other, anyhow,"said Beth, contentedly, from her corner.

The four young faces on which the firelight shone brightened at the cheerful words, but darkened again as Jo said sadly?

"We haven't got father, and shall not have him for a long time." She didn't say "perhaps never,"but each silently added it, thinking of father far away, where the fighting was.

Nobody spoke for a minute; then Meg said in an altered tone, "You know the reason mother proposed not having any presents this Christmas, was because it's going to be a hard winter for every one; and she thinks we ought not to spend money for pleasure, when our men are suffering so in the army. We can't do much, but we can make our little sacrifices, and ought to do it gladly. But I am afraid I don't;"and Megshook her head, as she thought regretfully of all the pretty things she wanted.

"But I don't think the little we should spend would do any good. We've each got a dollar, and the army wouldn't be much helped by our giving that. I agree not to expect anything from mother or you, but I do want to buy Undine and Sintram for myself; I've wanted it so long,'said Jo, who was a bookworm.

"I planned to spend mine in new music,"said Beth, with a little sigh, which no one heard but the hearth-brush and kettle-holder.

"I shall get a nice box of Faber's drawing pencils; I really need them," said Amy, decidedly.

"Mother didn't say anything about our money, and she won't wish us to give up everything. Let's each buy what we want, and have a little fun; I'm sure we grub hard enough to earn it,"cried Jo, examining the heels of her
boots in a gentlemanly manner.

"I know I do, teaching those dreadful children nearly all day, when I'm longing to enjoy myself at home," began Meg, in the complaining tone again.

"You don't have half such a hard time as I do," said Jo. "How would you like to be shut up for hours with a nervous, fussy old lady, who keeps you trotting, is never satisfied, and worries you till you"e ready to fly out of the window or box her ears?"

"It's naughty to fret, but I do think washing dishes and keeping things tidy is the worst work in the world. It makes me cross; and my hands get so stiff, I can't practise good a bit." And Beth looked at her rough hands with a sigh that any one could hear that time.

"I don't believe any of you suffer as I do," cried Amy; "for you don't have to go to school with impertinent girls, who plague you if you don't know your lessons, and laugh at your dresses, and label your father if he isn't rich, and insult you when your nose isn't nice."

"If you mean libel I'd say so, and not talk about labels, as if pa was a pickle-bottle," advised Jo, laughing.

Continues...


Excerpted from Mujercitas / Little Women by Louisa May Alcott Copyright © 0001 by Louisa May Alcott. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Louisa May Alcott was a novelist, an abolitionist, and a campaigner for women's rights. Some of her novels include Good Wives, Jo's Boys, and Little Men.

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Mujercitas (Little Women) 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Se me hisco muy raro