Multicultural Spanish Dictionary: How Everyday Spanish Differs from Country to Country

Multicultural Spanish Dictionary: How Everyday Spanish Differs from Country to Country

3.5 2
by Augustin Martinez, Morry Sofer
     
 

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Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world. What has been overlooked for a long time is the fact that there are thousands of everyday Spanish words that differ from one Spanish-speaking country to the next. A grapefruit in Guatemala is una toronja. In Argentina it is un pomelo. A waiter in Mexico is un mesero; in Uruguay, un mozo. In Spain,

Overview

Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world. What has been overlooked for a long time is the fact that there are thousands of everyday Spanish words that differ from one Spanish-speaking country to the next. A grapefruit in Guatemala is una toronja. In Argentina it is un pomelo. A waiter in Mexico is un mesero; in Uruguay, un mozo. In Spain, eyeglasses are gafas; in Cuba, espejuelos. This list goes on and on. With this multicultural dictionary, you will be able to see and learn the correct words and terms by country.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780884003175
Publisher:
Schreiber Publishing, Incorporated
Publication date:
03/15/2015
Edition description:
2nd Revised Edition
Pages:
284
Sales rank:
747,685
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 8.69(h) x 0.71(d)

Meet the Author

AUGUSTIN MARTINEZ is a Spanish translator.

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Multicultural Spanish Dictionary: How Everyday Spanish Differs from Country to Country 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I teach Spanish so I'm picky and expected something more comprehensive than what I got. You have to look in categories and it would be preferible ro just organize everything alphabetically. The real annoyance is that whoever typed it in did a rushed, sloppy job and didn't bother to hit the tab to start a new line for a new word entry. So one definition runs into another without starting a new line....really annoying. Just buy a good, big edition of Oxford's Sp/Eng dictionary and you're better off.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago