Mummy Wheat

Overview

Homer presents a world-view in which death represents the end of consciousness and total annihilation of personhood. Yet in Odyssey, Book Four, he contradicts this by saying that one man at least will not die, but will be transported to Elysium, where he will have a blessed existence forever. In Mummy Wheat R. Drew Griffith argues that this shocking violation of Homer's normal world-view comes from Egypt, where more than anywhere else in the ancient world people firmly believed in life after death. This Egyptian ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $7.69   
  • New (6) from $30.52   
  • Used (3) from $7.69   
Sending request ...

Overview

Homer presents a world-view in which death represents the end of consciousness and total annihilation of personhood. Yet in Odyssey, Book Four, he contradicts this by saying that one man at least will not die, but will be transported to Elysium, where he will have a blessed existence forever. In Mummy Wheat R. Drew Griffith argues that this shocking violation of Homer's normal world-view comes from Egypt, where more than anywhere else in the ancient world people firmly believed in life after death. This Egyptian view entered Homer deeply enough that traces of it can be found in many facets of his poetic language. Finally, Griffith argues, the Elysium idea did not die with Homer, but became enshrined in one of the most influential and long-lived religious traditions of Greece: the mysteries of Demeter at Eleusis outside of Athens.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

April 2009 Bryn Mawr Classical Review
Important
Martin Bernal
Since the 1990s consideration of Egyptian etymologies has opened up in the West, and such younger classicists as Garth Alford, Erwin Cook, and R. Drew Griffith have begun to study striking similarities between Egyptian and Homeric imagery and vocabulary.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761842989
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group Inc
  • Publication date: 10/1/2008
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

R. Drew Griffith is Professor of Classics at Queen's University at Kingston, Canada.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Brought Forth from the Land of Egypt Chapter 2 Rowing to Elysium: Menelaus' Afterlife and Egyptian Religion Chapter 3 The Voice of the Dead In the Odyssey and Egyptian Funerary Texts Chapter 4 The Origin of Memnon Chapter 5 Local Colour: The Egyptian Basis for some Homeric Descriptions Chapter 6 Mechanism of Contact Chapter 7 The Egyptian Background to the Eleusinian Mysteries Chapter 8 Near Death Experience and the Eleusinian Mysteries: Resuscitation as Psychotherapy Chapter 9 Afterward

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)