Munich [Original Motion Picture Soundtrack]

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Dave Gil de Rubio
For the score of Munich, which tells the true story of the Israeli athletes massacred at the 1972 Munich Olympics by Palestinian terrorists, Steven Spielberg tapped longtime collaborator John Williams. From the outset, Williams summons a forlorn mood, nesting the haunting, wordless vocals of Lisbeth Scott in a bed of moaning strings on the ominous opening track, "Munich, 1972," and the equally atmospheric "Remembering Munich," reminiscent of a Kaddish (the Jewish prayer of mourning). At the heart of this thriller is the quest by a team of Israeli secret service agents, led by Avner (Eric Bana), to find and assassinate the terrorists. As such, Williams masterfully ...
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12/27/2005 CD Soundtrack Fine Books, CDs, DVDs, Videogames, LPs & more! Fast shipping! All items guaranteed!

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Dave Gil de Rubio
For the score of Munich, which tells the true story of the Israeli athletes massacred at the 1972 Munich Olympics by Palestinian terrorists, Steven Spielberg tapped longtime collaborator John Williams. From the outset, Williams summons a forlorn mood, nesting the haunting, wordless vocals of Lisbeth Scott in a bed of moaning strings on the ominous opening track, "Munich, 1972," and the equally atmospheric "Remembering Munich," reminiscent of a Kaddish (the Jewish prayer of mourning). At the heart of this thriller is the quest by a team of Israeli secret service agents, led by Avner (Eric Bana), to find and assassinate the terrorists. As such, Williams masterfully hits all the right notes -- subtle timpani and cello arrangements heighten the escalation of the pulse-racing "Letter Bombs," while a Hungarian zither intensifies the foreboding of "Stalking Carl." And even as the score is suffused with an appropriately heavy mood, Williams offers a glimmer of light via the melancholy string arrangements of "A Prayer for Peace" and the unbowed resolve underlying his strings-rich rendition of the Israeli national anthem, "Hatikvah" (The Hope). Williams's compassionate and character-driven score lies at the heart of this controversial film, another fine byproduct of his winning partnership with Spielberg.
All Music Guide - William Ruhlmann
In his brief liner notes really more of an appreciation, director Steven Spielberg points out that composer John Williams' score for Munich, Spielberg's film about Israeli attempts to track down and kill the Palestinians responsible for the massacre of Israel's 1972 Olympic team, is his fourth score of 2005, following Star Wars: Episode Three -- Revenge of the Sith, Spielberg's own War of the Worlds, and Memoirs of a Geisha. That's not a bad output for a man who also celebrated his 73rd birthday during the year. Pointing to the very different sorts of film the four titles represent, Spielberg calls Williams "a master of disguise," a composer able to serve the different needs of such varying subjects. Every film composer must have something of that versatility, though in fact Williams may have it less than most, as he is the closest thing to a traditional Hollywood composer still active. With Munich, he is put in an area that is very familiar to him, since the film is set in Europe, allowing him to draw upon his familiarity with and affection for European classical music. He employs a large orchestra, and for the most part he has written a conservative score for it to play. The one aspect of the project that is unusual is the film's darkness, beginning with the massacre and then following the increasingly problematic actions of those assigned to exact revenge. This does not allow for the kind of stirring, swashbuckling themes of a Star Wars movie. Rather, it involves minor keys, lots of low tones no less than eight basses are used, and plenty of slow tempos. To make this tolerable, onscreen and on disc, Williams alternates the passages of dread with more romantic but still sad ones. Thus, the throbbing, percussive "Letter Bombs" is followed by "A Prayer for Peace," and other lyrical cues such as "Avner and Daphna" and "Avner's Theme" the latter a solo for classical guitar are interspersed with more jarring titles like "The Tarmac at Munich" and "Stalking Carl." But this remains a very dark score to accompany a dark film.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 12/27/2005
  • Label: Decca
  • UPC: 602498791424
  • Catalog Number: 000609302

Album Credits

Performance Credits
John Williams [composer] Conductor
Sue Raney Bass
Bruce Dukov Violin
Richard Todd Horn
Richard Altenbach Violin
William Booth Trombone
Gloria Cheng Piano
Brian Dembow Viola
Stephen Erdody Cello
Christine Ermacoff Cello
Alan Estes Percussion
Pedro Eustache Woodwind
Mike Fisher Percussion
Steve Gordon Viola
Endre Granat Violin
Alan Grunfeld Violin
Clayton Haslop Violin
Roland Kato Viola
Randy Kerber Piano
Armen Ksadjikian Cello
Janet Lakatos Viola
Dimitrie Leivici Violin
Rene Mandel Violin
Edward Meares Bass
Bruce Morgenthaler Bass
Helen Nightengale Violin
Simon Oswell Viola
Dean Parks Guitar
Katia Popov Violin
Anatoly Rosinsky Violin
Chet Swiatkowski Piano
George Thatcher Trombone
Doug Tornquist Tuba
Cecilia Tsan Cello
Miwako Watanabe Violin
Roger Wilkie Violin, Concert Master
Ken Yerke Violin
Andrew Shulman Cello
John Walz Cello
Drew Dembowski Bass
Susan Ranney Bass
Lisa Sutton Violin
Jeanne Evans Violin
William Frank "Bill" Reichenbach Jr. Trombone
Gary Bovyer Clarinet
Christian Kollgaard Bass
Timothy Landauer Cello
Rafael Rishik Violin
Lisbeth Scott Vocals
Bing Wang Violin
Nico Abondolo Bass
Shawn Mann Viola
Darrin McCann Viola
Sara Parkins Violin
Antony Cooke Cello
David Parmeter Bass
Keith Greene Viola
Robert Berg Viola
Irina Voloshina Violin
Eun Mee Ahn Violin
Roberto Cani Violin
Adam del Monte Guitar
Oscar Hidalgo Bass
Thomas Dienner Viola
Sarah Thornblade Violin
Ralph Williams Clarinet, Bass Clarinet
Jerry Williams Percussion
John Williams & the Tick Tocks Conductor
John MacArthur Ellis Oboe
Eric J. Hosler Violin
Gregory Goodall Percussion
Ana Landauer Violin
Andrew Malloy Trombone
Joshua Ranz Clarinet, Bass Clarinet
Steve L. Roberts Clarinet, Bass Clarinet
Radu Pieptea Violin
Don Williams Timpani
Armen Ksajikian Cello
Thomas Diener Viola
Kenneth Yerke Violin
Mike Fisher Percussion
Michael Nowak Viola
David Duke Horn
Steve Roberts Clarinet, Bass Clarinet
Tomas Raney Percussion
James Thatcher Horn
Phillip Levy Violin
Marlow Fisher Viola
Paul Cohen Cello
Chris Ermacoff Cello
John Ellis Oboe
Steven Becknell Horn
Tamara Hatwan Violin
Jo Ann Turovsky Harp
David H. Speltz Cello
Sarah Parkins Violin
Kevin Connolly Violin
Technical Credits
John Williams [composer] Composer, Producer, Audio Production
Shawn Murphy Engineering
Steven Spielberg Liner Notes
Pat Sullivan Mastering
John Williams & the Tick Tocks Producer
Sheryl Gold Music Business Affairs
Philip Cohen Music Business Affairs
Chris Roberts Contributor
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A Wonderful Soundtrack

    John Williams has done it again. He combines Schindler's List, Amistad and Saving Private Ryan. It is also a wonderful movie, too. Please enjoy Lisabeth Scott for her wonderful vocals.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    2005 belongs to jw

    In a very storied career, 2005 may be his finest. Star wars, geisha, war of the worlds and munich. Anyone would be happy to have one on their resume. JW is in my humble opinion the greatest film composer ever!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Another Williams gem!

    "Munich" features some of the best film music of the year.The score is powerful, intense,and quite haunting.It is brilliantly performed by the LA Recording Arts Orchestra under the master's superb baton.This is his best work since "Saving Private Ryan".

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    My Favorite Movie

    This Rocks! Avner Rocks, Munich ROCKS!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Munich

    This is a fantastic piece of music! I really enjoy hearing Lisbeth Scott's vocals and the other soloists such as Steve Erdody on cello. And I look forward to hearing the Boston Pops String Sections play "Hatikvah" or "A Prayer for Peace" at Tanglewood this summer. This score is very emotional because of its intensity in the slow, somber pieces of music. The scherzo's in 7/8 time or the dissonant sounds also have intensity/build up, but really only fill in the mood of certain scenes in the film, as Williams does perfectly always! It must have been a great experience for the LA Recording Arts Orchestra to play this music for a great composer.

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