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Murder in C Major
     

Murder in C Major

3.7 3
by Sara Hoskinson Frommer
 

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The Oliver Civic Symphony is just another small-town orchestra, a gathering spot for local amateur musicians. It has weekly rehearsals, punch and cookies, and colorful gossip, and now… it has murder.
An oboist suddenly drops dead of what turns out to be a rare poison. A flutist’s throat is slashed. Joan Spencer is new in town – but quickly

Overview

The Oliver Civic Symphony is just another small-town orchestra, a gathering spot for local amateur musicians. It has weekly rehearsals, punch and cookies, and colorful gossip, and now… it has murder.
An oboist suddenly drops dead of what turns out to be a rare poison. A flutist’s throat is slashed. Joan Spencer is new in town – but quickly becomes an old hand at digging out clues. And with the help of Oliver policeman Fred Lundquist, she uncovers a daring melody that only a murderous virtuoso could perform.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940016120522
Publisher:
SKLA
Publication date:
12/20/2012
Series:
Joan Spencer Mysteries , #1
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
333,187
File size:
501 KB

Meet the Author

Sara Hoskinson Frommer, a veteran of the Bloomington Symphony Orchestra’s viola section, lives with her husband in Bloomington, Indiana. They have two adult sons.
Her seventh Joan Spencer mystery, Her Brother’s Keeper, will be published in April 2013 by Perseverance Press http://www.danielpublishing.com/perseverance
Visit her website: www.sff.net/people/SaraHoskinsonFrommer

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Murder in C Major 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
ThePolyBlog More than 1 year ago
PLOT OR PREMISE: Joan Spencer, widowed, moves back to Oliver with her son Andrew and joins the local orchestra in her spare time. The second week of rehearsals is marred by the death of an unpopular oboe player. Joan helps the police investigate the murder (big surprise!) and does a pretty good job of spotting essential clues. . WHAT I LIKED: Well written, characters nicely developed, including some hints of romance between Joan and the cop. Interesting was the switch between the two characters as the narrator -- not quite third person, not quite first person and surprisingly well-executed in the writing. The story moves along fairly quickly and doesn't drag. . WHAT I DIDN'T LIKE: Perhaps too many characters with too many motives and opportunities. Unfortunately for me, I figured out the ending far too far in advance as well as the reasons for it -- and yet I still got the murderer wrong! (Missed it by *that* much!) . DISCLOSURE: I received no compensation, not even a free copy, in exchange for this review. I am not personal friends with the author, but I did interact with her online.
MaicaKid More than 1 year ago
Musicians will enjoy! Joan Spencer's husband has died at a relatively young age, and after an unpleasant experience she moves with her son to her hometown of Oliver, Indiana. Living in Ohio (and as an IU basketball fan) it was fun to recognize small-town Indiana in many of the descriptions. Joan plays viola and decides to join the community orchestra. At her first rehearsal, the principal oboist falls ill, later dying at the hospital from an apparent heart attack...apparent being the operative word. Soon it's pretty clear there's more going on, especially when a second orchestra member dies. I won't spoil things but as a musician I was pretty sure how the murders were committed although the murderer wasn't as easy to figure out. Yes, figuring out the modus operandi took a bit away from the story, but didn't ruin it. I enjoyed the book and will check out book 2 and see if I want to continue.
LAHC More than 1 year ago
I'd definitely take this one on vacation! I'm an oboist myself, so I was curious to see how the author would handle the idiosyncratic tendencies of various instrumentalists. Would the characters be stereotypical to the voices of those sounds? All in all, it's probably not perfect, but it doesnt matter. I think she did a great job and It's a great story. It's fun and worth the read.