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The Murder of Napoleon
     

The Murder of Napoleon

4.0 1
by Ben Weider, David Hapgood
 

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The history books say that Napoleon died of natural causes. Napoleon himself, expiring at 51 after a lifetime of robust health, suspected otherwise and ordered a thorough autopsy. His suspicions were well-founded. So clever was the crime, however, that until recent developments in forensic science, it was impossible to prove a case of murder, let alone name the killer

Overview

The history books say that Napoleon died of natural causes. Napoleon himself, expiring at 51 after a lifetime of robust health, suspected otherwise and ordered a thorough autopsy. His suspicions were well-founded. So clever was the crime, however, that until recent developments in forensic science, it was impossible to prove a case of murder, let alone name the killer. Now, the authors of this fascinating book assert, it has been done--by a brilliant man whose 20-year inquest, a feat of detection, has produced one of history's greatest surprises.

Editorial Reviews

Newsweek
History at its most electrifying
New York Times Book Review
A nonfiction whodunit based on modern scientific technique
History Book Club
A spellbinding whodunit about one of history's greatest crimes

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781583481509
Publisher:
iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date:
01/01/1998
Pages:
300
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.67(d)

What People are Saying About This

Harold C. Deutsch
Thoroughly convincing... A major Odyssey in historical research.
— professor of military history, U.S. Army War College

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The Murder of Napoleon 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Beirut768 More than 1 year ago
Napoleon felt entitled to rule Europe and cheated to secure the necessary esteem by threats or show of power; but most Europeans did not acknowledge his title; `the Emperor'.
To protect its interests Britain planned, manoeuvred and worked in the dark to achieve one main goal: " preserve the British Empire". Britain's lust for power has placed, as the first priority on its policy, the `extermination' of Napoleon.
The distaste was reciprocated. Napoleon detested England's alliance with Russia and Austria.
In the end Napoleon was beaten at Waterloo.
Napoleon's captivity in Saint Helena, the island of volcanic origin in the South Atlantic Ocean, squeezed his health like a dry lemon. The island was infested and muggy; knout climate was already like a pogrom to massacre the ex-Emperor.

The fifty-two years old Emperor of the French knew he would die there. He had already encountered tuberculosis - facing the harsh winter weather conditions - during his campaign on Russia and the ruinous retreat in 1812.

He never recovered and remained frail for the next nine years. What started in the lungs, at the final stages affected the bones and joints accentuated by damp weather and feelings of despair...