Murdering Mr. Lincoln: A New Detection of the 19th Century's Most Famous Crime

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Overview

"In this original work, Charles Higham addresses one of the greatest historical mysteries: did John Wilkes Booth act alone on the night of Good Friday, 1865 or was he part of a wide conspiracy?" "Using previously hidden documents, over 5,000 pages in all, drawing from letters, diaries, previously hidden official hearings, railway timetables and obscure shipping manifests, he has woven an account of high level intrigue. He proves conclusively that very high level figures, including the richest banker in America, were involved in the murder plot, ...
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Overview

"In this original work, Charles Higham addresses one of the greatest historical mysteries: did John Wilkes Booth act alone on the night of Good Friday, 1865 or was he part of a wide conspiracy?" "Using previously hidden documents, over 5,000 pages in all, drawing from letters, diaries, previously hidden official hearings, railway timetables and obscure shipping manifests, he has woven an account of high level intrigue. He proves conclusively that very high level figures, including the richest banker in America, were involved in the murder plot, of which John Wilkes Booth was merely the puppet-like instrument." Most of all, the book solves the greatest of historical mysteries: the disputed involvement of the accused co-conspirator John Surratt, whose mother was hanged for the crime.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
It's the nature of conspiracy theories to drag in ever more suspects, and this study of Lincoln's assassination casts a wide net indeed. Higham (American Swastika) implicates not only John Wilkes Booth's band of conspirators, but Confederate secret agents in Canada and Northern Democratic and Copperhead politicians and businessmen, including Union general George McClellan. Connecting them, Higham contends, was a network of semilicit wartime trade between North and South, facilitated by Lincoln and encompassing both his supporters and his enemies. Higham ties together a variety of Civil War figures and goings-on to suggest the hand of treacherous moneyed interests in Lincoln's murder, but he insinuates far more than he demonstrates. Much space is devoted to Confederate subversion operations and raids that had nothing to do with Lincoln's murder. Major claims-that Confederate agent George N. Sanders played a leading role in the assassination plot, or that assassination conspirators were motivated by considerations of Lincoln's "usefulness" to their own trading activities-are tantalizing, but not sufficiently substantiated. The McClellan-Booth link rests precariously on an anonymous report of a New York supper the famous general and the famous actor supposedly both attended. Scholars will be puzzled at Higham's interpretations-Copperhead congressman Clement L. Vallandigham is described as an "anarchist"-and stymied by his inadequate and sometimes garbled source notes. General readers will note that the text feels disorganized, a tangle of factoids. Conspiracy theorists and Civil War buffs may want to take a gander, but overall this book adds little to our understanding of the assassination. (Feb.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781413265156
  • Publisher: New Millennium Entertainment
  • Publication date: 1/27/2004
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 6.38 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.98 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 1.5
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2006

    Chaotic and difficult to read

    Poorly written and ponderous to read. This book offers no logical flow of ideas or characters. Often the superfluous use of an endless list of names and their loose connection to each other approaches gibberish. There is no real character development. Statements have little or no substantiation of facts. Instead the author seems to rely on repetition to create false validity. The trading between North and South may certainly have taken place but you'll find no real factual basis here. This is certainly no scholarly treatment of the Lincoln assasination.

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