Murdering to Dissect: Grave-Robbing, Frankenstein and the Anatomy Literature

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780719045424
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press
  • Publication date: 2/28/1996
  • Pages: 354

Table of Contents

Illustrations
Acknowledgements
Chronology of events
Introduction: murdering to dissect 1
The Edinburgh scandal 1828-29 1
Galvanism 4
Utopia and reality 7
Frankenstein and the 1832 Anatomy Act 11
Pt. I Frankenstein: the 1832 context 17
1 The dead body business 19
Bentham's auto-icon 19
Richardson's argument in Death, Dissection and the Destitute 23
Sir Walter Scott in Edinburgh, 1829 28
The surgeon as murderer: On Murder considered as one of the Fine Arts 33
The contented executioner in Barnaby Rudge 38
2 Multi-accentuation in On Murder considered as one of the Fine Arts and Frankenstein 44
Social signs 44
The Note of the Editor in On Murder considered as one of the Fine Arts 46
The politics of anatomy: the voices in Frankenstein, 1831 50
Pt. II The law made flesh 61
3 The instruments of law 63
Intextuation 63
Public and comparative anatomy 68
Trading 74
The surgeon as artist: John Hunter and Mrs Martin Van Butchell 79
Aesthetics and murder 83
4 The death command, anatomy and the law, 1750-1850 91
The gibbet 91
Frankenstein: the arche-command 94
Claiming 97
1832: the domestication of command 102
The coach scene in Oliver Twist and Frankenstein 106
Dickens' executioner 110
Barnaby Rudge and Frankenstein: the sting of command 113
Pt. III The eighteenth century 127
5 The medical gaze and popular culture 129
Hogarth's 'The Reward of Cruelty' 129
Unhallowed wretches 137
Duplication 141
The 'gallows wedding' in Frankenstein 143
The watching ritual 150
I will be with you on your wedding-night 156
6 Paternalism and poverty: the 1780s and 1790s 160
Blake's 'accidental' 160
Speenhamland and the market system 162
Crabbe's crowd 166
Frankenstein and pauper lunacy 169
Pt. IV The early nineteenth century 175
7 Frankenstein and the resurrectionist culture, 1796-1825 177
Southey's The Surgeon's Warning 177
William Godwin's Essay on Sepulchres, 1809 and Thomas Southwood Smith's The Use of the Dead to the Living, 1824 179
The hulks 185
Joanna Southcott's dissection, 1814 188
The punishment of poverty and Frankenstein 198
Anti and pro dissection: the pamphlet literature of the 1820s 201
Utilitarianism: morality and secrecy 206
Pain and grief in Frankenstein 212
8 Burkophobia, choleraphobia and the law: Frankenstein in 1831 219
Edinburgh 219
The political allegory 230
From crowd to social class 238
Microscopic vision and the plague 241
Clerval 251
The surgeon's alibi 253
Choleraphobia 256
Disease, deformity and dissection 260
The graveyard 270
Panic 274
Laughter 282
The hare 290
The Ship-of-State 296
9 Frankenstein's mask: England 1831-32 303
The mask 303
'The burnings, the alarms' 310
The midnight figure 315
10 Conclusion 329
Two nations, two funerals: 'the punishment of the poor men' in Mrs Gaskell's Mary Barton 331
Select bibliography 340
Index 347
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