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Murphy
     

Murphy

4.7 3
by Samuel Beckett
 

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'Murphy', Samuel Beckett's first published novel, was written in English and published in London in 1938; Beckett himself subsequently translated the book into French, and it was published in France in 1947. The novel recounts the hilarious but tragic life of Murphy in London as he attempts to establish a home and to amass sufficient fortune for his intended bride to

Overview

'Murphy', Samuel Beckett's first published novel, was written in English and published in London in 1938; Beckett himself subsequently translated the book into French, and it was published in France in 1947. The novel recounts the hilarious but tragic life of Murphy in London as he attempts to establish a home and to amass sufficient fortune for his intended bride to join him.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802150370
Publisher:
Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/1994
Series:
Beckett, Samuel
Pages:
282
Product dimensions:
5.38(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.78(d)

What People are Saying About This

Anthony Burgess
Samuel Beckett is one of the great controversial playwrights of our age….As a novelist he is just as important. His novels, like all important works of art, has the stamp of the inevitable on them: they had to be written and, though we suffer reading them, we are glad that they have been written.
Richard Seaver
Murphy is very much the forerunner of that remarkable series of works whose protagonists search endlessly for nonexistent answers, each embarked upon a journey that has no end.
Dr. Gierow
Dr. Karl Gierow of the Swedish Academy in the 1969 Commentary on the Award of the Nobel Prize for Literature to Samuel Beckett
In the realms of annihilation, the writing of Samuel Beckett rises like a misereie from all mankind, its muffled minor key finding liberation to the oppressed and comfort to those in need.

Meet the Author

Samuel Beckett: Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), one of the leading literary and dramatic figures of the twentieth century, was born in Foxrock, Ireland and attended Trinity University in Dublin. In 1928, he visited Paris for the first time and fell in with a number of avant-garde writers and artists, including James Joyce. In 1937, he settled in Paris permanently. Beckett wrote in both English and French, though his best-known works are mostly in the latter language. A prolific writer of novels, short stories, and poetry, he is remembered principally for his works for the theater, which belong to the tradition of the Theater of the Absurd and are characterized by their minimalist approach, stripping drama to its barest elements. In 1969, Beckett was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature and commended for having "transformed the destitution of man into his exaltation." Beckett died in Paris in 1989.

At the age of seventy-six he said: "With diminished concentration, loss of memory, obscured intelligence... the more chance there is for saying something closest to what one really is. Even though everything seems inexpressible, there remains the need to express. A child need to make a sand castle even though it makes no sense. In old age, with only a few grains of sand, one has the greatest possibility." (from Playwrights at Work, ed. by George Plimpton, 2000)

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Murphy 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Murphy works as a novel, up to a certain point. Like most Joycean influenced works, this novel sometimes loses itself in vague obscurities. The key to this work is the main character and how closely the reader can identify with him determines whether the novel succeeds or not. Murphy, like most people of the twentieth century, is disillusioned with modern life, especially the part of it that requires us to work. The problem at times is that Murphy and Celia, his lover, are well drawn, but the other characters seem to be just hastily assembled scenery. The phraseology the book uses is interesting at first but becomes distracting towards the end. All in all, the book is very prophetic of the present, with its search for meaning in a capitalist society. It almost plays like a 1938 'American Beauty'. This is a book that you read partly to enjoy and partly to gain wisdom from.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago