Music in Western Civilization, Volume I: Antiquity through the Baroque / Edition 1

Music in Western Civilization, Volume I: Antiquity through the Baroque / Edition 1

by Craig Wright, Bryan R. Simms
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0495008656

ISBN-13: 9780495008651

Pub. Date: 07/01/2005

Publisher: Cengage Learning

Understand music in context with MUSIC IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION, VOLUME I: ANTIQUITY THROUGH THE BAROQUE! Clear and easy-to-understand, this music text provides you with the tools you need to succeed in this course. With a focus on the history of music in the wider context of Western civilization, you will see how study of music history is important to the

Overview

Understand music in context with MUSIC IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION, VOLUME I: ANTIQUITY THROUGH THE BAROQUE! Clear and easy-to-understand, this music text provides you with the tools you need to succeed in this course. With a focus on the history of music in the wider context of Western civilization, you will see how study of music history is important to the practice and performance of music today. Numerous full-color photographs, maps, and timelines give you a sense of the place of music within the arts and humanities in the West. Class preparation is made easy with the book-specific website that contains features such as additional musical selections, a music glossary, unit resources, and more.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780495008651
Publisher:
Cengage Learning
Publication date:
07/01/2005
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
432
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.80(h) x 0.60(d)

Table of Contents

PART I: ANTIQUITY AND THE MIDDLE AGES. 1. Music in Ancient Greece. 2. Antiquity to the Middle Ages: Music in Rome, Jerusalem, and the Early Christian World. 3. Music in the Monastery and Convent. 4. Music Theory in the Monastery: John of St. Gall and Guido of Arezzo. 5. Later Medieval Chant: Tropes, Sequences, and the Liturgical Drama of Hildegard of Bingen. 6. Troubadours and Trouvères. 7. Early Polyphony. 8. Music in Medieval Paris: Polyphony at Notre Dame. 9. Music in the Cathedral Close and University: Conductus and Motet. 10. In the Parisian Master's Study: Music Theory of the Ars Antiqua and Ars Nova. 11. Music at the Court of the French Kings. 12. Fourteenth-Century Music in Reims: Guillaume de Machaut. 13. Avignon, Symbolic Scores, and the Ars Subtilior. MUSICAL INTERLUDE 1. FROM MEDIEVAL MANUSCRIPT TO MODERN PERFORMANCE. PART II: THE LATE MIDDLE AGES AND EARLY RENAISSANCE. 14. Music in Florence, 1350-1425. 15. Music at the Cathedral of Florence. 16. Music in England. 17. Music at the Court of Burgundy. 18. Music at the French Royal Court. 19. Music in the Low Countries. PART III: THE LATE RENAISSANCE. MUSICAL INTERLUDE 2. MUSICAL HUMANISM AND THE RENAISSANCE. 20. Popular Music in Florence, 1475-1540: Carnival Song and Lauda, Frottola, and Early Madrigal. 21. Josquin Des Prez and Music in Ferrara. MUSICAL INTERLUDE 3. MUSIC PRINTING DURING THE RENAISSANCE. 22. Music in Renaissance Paris. 23. Renaissance Instruments and Instrumental Music. MUSICAL INTERLUDE 4. MUSIC THEORY IN THE RENAISSANCE. 24. Music in Three German Cities: The Protestant-Catholic Confrontation. 25. Rome and the Music of the Counter-Reformation. 26. Music in Elizabethan England, Part I: Early Vocal Music. 27. Music in Elizabethan England, Part II: Instrumental Music and Later Vocal Music. 28. The Later Madrigal in Ferrara and Mantua: Gesualdo and Monteverdi. PART IV: BAROQUE MUSIC. 29. Early Baroque Music. 30. The Birth of Opera: Florence, Mantua, and Venice. 31. The Concerted Style in Venice and Dresden. 32. Religious Music in Baroque Rome. 33. Instrumental Music in Italy. 34. Instrumental Music in Germany and Austria. 35. Music in Paris and at the Court of Versailles, Part I: Vocal Music. 36. Music in Paris and at the Court of Versailles, Part II: Instrumental Music. Musical Interlude 5: From Ancient to Modern: Aspects of Baroque Music Theory. 37. Music in London, Part I: Henry Purcell. 38. Music in London, Part II: George Frideric Handel. 39. Johann Sebastian Bach: Instrumental Music in Weimar and Cöthen. 40. Johann Sebastian Bach: Vocal Music in Leipzig.

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