Music Lessons: Guide Your Child to Play a Musical Instrument (and Enjoy It!)

Overview


Named one of Publishers Weekly's Best 100 Books of 2006.
 

Providing guidance for parents who want their children to enjoy learning to play a musical instrument, this resource teaches parents the best ways to encourage children's musical talents. Key guidance is provided for the trickiest hurdles of all: helping children learn how to practice and navigating their impulse to quit by encouraging them to take pride in their progress despite ...

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Overview


Named one of Publishers Weekly's Best 100 Books of 2006.
 

Providing guidance for parents who want their children to enjoy learning to play a musical instrument, this resource teaches parents the best ways to encourage children's musical talents. Key guidance is provided for the trickiest hurdles of all: helping children learn how to practice and navigating their impulse to quit by encouraging them to take pride in their progress despite the frustrations of the learning process. Commonly taught methods—including Suzuki, Kodaly, Dalcroze training, and the Orff approach—and instrument selection are discussed in detail, as are tips for choosing the right teacher. Up-to-date resources and references for youth orchestras, national and regional organizations, outreach programs, and school advocacy organizations, and supplementary materials for various ages and stages of ability, are provided.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Invaluable, incisive, and a wonderful read, too. If only Salieri's parents had had this book!"  David Hajdu, author, Positively 4th Street and Lush Life

"Reading Stephanie Crease's book is like sitting down with a good friend—laughing, listening to her wise words, and suddenly realizing that your life has been changed and lit up with joy."  —Paula Robison, world-famous flutist

"This informative and useful guide, which includes suggested reading and listening resources, is highly recommended for all public libraries and for academic libraries that support music education programs."  —Library Journal

Publishers Weekly
Crease, a music journalist (Gil Evans: Out of the Cool), gently guides parents through the potentially overwhelming process of choosing a musical instrument for their child, and nurturing musical development throughout childhood. Noting that public schools have lost the beat when it comes to music education, Crease urges parents to take matters into their own hands, beginning early on to shape their child's musical world. Not intended to help parents raise professional musicians, the book is a primer on how to encourage music education and enjoyment. Crease explores preschool programs like Music Together and Kindermusik, then delves into the Suzuki method, Kodaly, Dalcroze and Orff, explaining the philosophy of each approach. Included are such topics as musical readiness, picking an instrument and finding the right teacher. For parents who are not musically trained, Crease explains the families of instruments, pointing out which are best suited to various ages. Though Crease doesn't gloss over how playing a musical instrument benefits the brain (better attention span, sharper focus, increased memory retention and higher test scores), her focus is the hands-on process of helping children choose and practice an instrument. This clear-cut guide will help parents find the right musical fit for their child-and introduce them to what might be a fun and engaging hobby. (Aug.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Since the mid-1970s, budget cuts have decimated general and instrumental music education programs in the public school system. Currently, only one-third of U.S. schools offer string and band programs. Writing as the concerned parent of a budding musician, award-winning music journalist Crease (Gil Evans: Out of the Cool) provides an invaluable and accessible resource to help parents initiate and nurture their children's musical education. She presents practical information for identifying musical interest in young children, selecting the right instrument, and finding the right teacher. Furthermore, she promotes an understanding of the role of music education to develop a whole person-one with emotional sensitivity, physical coordination, mental discipline, humanistic engagement, and wide-ranging interests. While taking the mystery out of classical music and instruction methods, including Suzuki, Kodaly, Dalcroze, and Orff, Crease furnishes advice for helping children learn to practice, take pride in their progress, and maintain interest. This informative and useful guide, which includes suggested reading and listening resources, is highly recommended for all public libraries and for academic libraries that support music education programs.-Elizabeth M. Wavle, Elmira Coll. Lib., NY Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781556526046
  • Publisher: Chicago Review Press, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 7/1/2006
  • Pages: 216
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.48 (d)

Meet the Author

Stephanie Stein Crease is the author of Gil Evans: Out of the Cool, a winner of the ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award, and Duke Ellington: His Life in Jazz. She is a music journalist who has contributed to the New York Times, Down Beat, JAZZIZ, Pulse, and The Oxford Companion to Jazz.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
1 The Early Ear, Ages Two to Five 1
2 Method Madness 21
3 Tuning Up 43
4 Choosing the Right Instrument 69
5 The Instruments 91
6 Finding a Teacher 111
7 Practice, Practice, Practice 131
8 Strike Up the Band 149
9 Sifting Through the Myths: A Conclusion 167
Resources 173
Bibliography 185
Index 189
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