Muslim Girls and the Other France: Race, Identity Politics, and Social Exclusion / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$13.50
(Save 41%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $5.73
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 75%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (24) from $5.73   
  • New (13) from $16.00   
  • Used (11) from $5.73   

Overview

"[Keaton] provides the most in-depth analysis of the predicament of
French Arabs and Africans living in the suburbs of Paris.... [O]ne can read the book through the lens of such great African American writers and activists as Richard Wright, James Baldwin, and
Malcolm X.... [It] contains an implicit warning to you, France, not to repeat the American racism in your country." —from the foreword by Manthia Diawara

Muslim girls growing up in the outer-cities of Paris are portrayed many ways in popular discourse—as oppressed, submissive, foreign, "kids from the projects," even as veil-wearing menaces to France’s national identity—but rarely are they perceived simply as what they say they are: French. Amid widespread perceptions of heightened urban violence attributed to Muslims and highly publicized struggles over whether Muslim students should be allowed to wear headscarves to school, Muslim girls often appear to be the quintessential "other."
In this vivid, evocative study, Trica Danielle Keaton draws on ethnographic research in schools,
housing projects, and other settings among Muslim teenagers of North and West African origin. She finds contradictions between the ideal of universalism and the lived reality of ethnic distinction and racialized discrimination. The author’s own experiences as an African American woman and non-Muslim are key parts of her analysis. Keaton makes a powerful statement about identity,
race, and educational politics in contemporary France.

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Women's Review of Books

"... a call to arms... measured and analytic—its cadences are those of a committed, engaged intellectual. Still, for all of its hard-headed, theoretically penetrating analyses, it is also a tender treatise. It is full of love—for girls, who have the right to live fully, and for all marginalized people, who should have all the rights that white French people have." —Women's Review of Books

International Journal of Middle East Studies (IJMES)
"... the book's detailed exploration of the lived experiences of immigrant-origin girls and of the identities they form as they navigate the competing demands of home, school, and wider society makes an important ethnographic contribution to the study of postcolonial France." —Mayanthi L. Fernando, Washington University, St. Louis, INTNL JRNL MID EAST STD - IJMES, Vol. 40 2008

— Mayanthi L. Fernando, Washington University, St. Louis

Journal Middle East Women's Stds JMEWS
...Keaton turns a sharp eye on the abandonment of national education by the French state....Her sensitivity to the dire living conditions of the people she interviews runs through her examination of the orders of structural exclusion in French society that are silently organized and underpinned by economic destitution.... Keaton has successfully brought to the forefront of her analysis: how the primacy of racism in France continues to subject a material reality with deplorable emotional and physical effects on French Muslim African men and women.—Ruth Mas, University of Colorado, Boulder, Journal Middle East Women's Stds JMEWS, Vol.6.2 Spring 2010

— Ruth Mas, University of Colorado, Boulder

Journal Middle East Women's Studiess JMEWS
"...Keaton turns a sharp eye on the abandonment of national education by the French state....Her sensitivity to the dire living conditions of the people she interviews runs through her examination of the orders of structural exclusion in French society that are silently organized and underpinned by economic destitution.... Keaton has successfully brought to the forefront of her analysis: how the primacy of racism in France continues to subject a material reality with deplorable emotional and physical effects on French Muslim African men and women." —Ruth Mas, University of Colorado, Boulder, Journal Middle East Women's Studiess JMEWS, Vol.6.2 Spring 2010

— Ruth Mas, University of Colorado, Boulder

INTNL JRNL MID EAST STD - IJMES - Mayanthi L. Fernando

"... the book's detailed exploration of the lived experiences of immigrant-origin girls and of the identities they form as they navigate the competing demands of home, school, and wider society makes an important ethnographic contribution to the study of postcolonial France." —Mayanthi L. Fernando, Washington University, St. Louis, INTNL JRNL MID EAST STD - IJMES, Vol. 40 2008

Journal Middle East Women's Stds JMEWS - Ruth Mas

"...Keaton turns a sharp eye on the abandonment of national education by the French state....Her sensitivity to the dire living conditions of the people she interviews runs through her examination of the orders of structural exclusion in French society that are silently organized and underpinned by economic destitution.... Keaton has successfully brought to the forefront of her analysis: how the primacy of racism in France continues to subject a material reality with deplorable emotional and physical effects on French Muslim African men and women." —Ruth Mas, University of Colorado, Boulder, Journal Middle East Women's Stds JMEWS, Vol.6.2 Spring 2010

From the Publisher

"... the book's detailed exploration of the lived experiences of immigrant-origin girls and of the identities they form as they navigate the competing demands of home, school, and wider society makes an important ethnographic contribution to the study of postcolonial France."
—Mayanthi L. Fernando, Washington University, St. Louis, INTNL JRNL MID EAST STD - IJMES,
Vol. 40 2008

"...Keaton turns a sharp eye on the abandonment of national education by the French state....Her sensitivity to the dire living conditions of the people she interviews runs through her examination of the orders of structural exclusion in French society that are silently organized and underpinned by economic destitution.... Keaton has successfully brought to the forefront of her analysis: how the primacy of racism in France continues to subject a material reality with deplorable emotional and physical effects on French Muslim African men and women." —Ruth Mas,
University of Colorado, Boulder, Journal Middle East Women's Stds JMEWS, Vol.6.2 Spring
2010

Women's Review of Books
. . . a call to arms . . . measured and analytic--its cadences are those of a committed, engaged intellectual. Still, for all of its hard-headed, theoretically penetrating analyses, it is also a tender treatise. It is full of love--for girls, who have the right to live fully, and for all marginalized people, who should have all the rights that white French people have.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780253218346
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press
  • Publication date: 2/1/2006
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 1,450,147
  • Product dimensions: 6.12 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 0.63 (d)

Meet the Author

Trica Danielle Keaton is Assistant Professor in the Department of American Studies and the Institute for Global Studies at the University of Minnesota.

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Foreword by Manthia
Diawara
Acknowledgments
Introduction
1. Unmixing French "National
Identity"
2. Structured Exclusion: Public Housing in the French Outer City
3.
Transmitting a "Common Culture": Symbolic Violence Realized
4. Counterforces: Educational
Inequality and Relative Resistance
5. Beyond Identity: Muslim Girls and the Politics of
Their Existence
Epilogue: And So It
Goes...
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)