×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Mutiny: A History of Naval Insurrection
     

Mutiny: A History of Naval Insurrection

by Leonard F. Guttridge
 

See All Formats & Editions

From the early days of fighting sail to the modern steel machines of the world's navies, sailors have always endured many hardships. Isolation, claustrophobic living conditions, seemingly endless voyages, monotonous routines, and lack of communication beyond the sea vessel are reason enough to inspire dissatisfaction in a single member of a crew. For dissatisfaction

Overview

From the early days of fighting sail to the modern steel machines of the world's navies, sailors have always endured many hardships. Isolation, claustrophobic living conditions, seemingly endless voyages, monotonous routines, and lack of communication beyond the sea vessel are reason enough to inspire dissatisfaction in a single member of a crew. For dissatisfaction to swell into open rebellion and mutiny is a ship captain's worst fear. In Mutiny: A History of Naval Insurrection, author Leonard E Guttridge provides a fascinating account of the history behind the most dreaded of military terms. From Magellan's expedition to circumnavigate the globe and the infamous HMS Bounty and battleship Potemkin insurrections to the demonstrations aboard the United States aircraft carriers Kitty Hawk and Constellation, this gripping narrative delivers voyage after voyage of life and death situations where men dared to defy military authority.

Editorial Reviews

Associated Press
This is a well-balanced, illuminating treatment of a rather murky subject, handled deftly. A valuable addition to any naval library.
KLIATT
The very word "mutiny" conjures up romantic images of sailing vessels, buccaneers, and—inevitably—the colorful tale of HMS Bounty. Yet all navies throughout history have experienced sporadic disobedience and outright rebellion, and a crew's refusal to obey orders is the latent nightmare of any commanding officer. These stories of insurrection afloat will hold the interest of any reader with a passing interest in ships and the sea. Guttridge is an experienced writer of popular history, particularly exploration and maritime affairs, and knows how to hold an audience. Despite the temptations of his subject, his writing style is restrained rather than lurid, and there is enough detail to satisfy the thoughtful reader. Best of all, this collection is full of surprises. Few today have heard of the disgraceful affair on board the brig Somers in 1842, for which the son of the Secretary of War was hanged, but the scandal rang through the young American republic. The Royal Navy has had its own share of mutinies through the years, most notably in the 18th century when an entire flotilla went on strike at Spithead, yet the most recent such event happened at Panama during WW II. And most of the readers who devoured The Hunt For Red October will be surprised to learn that an equally dramatic, but much less successful, event happened aboard a Soviet missile frigate in 1975. Guttridge does full justice to the Bounty affair, of course, but he is equally thorough with the shameful racial "incidents" that took place aboard two U.S. aircraft carriers during the Vietnam era. Recommended to high school libraries and public collections. KLIATT Codes: SA—Recommended for senior highschool students, advanced students, and adults. 1992, Berkley, 320p. illus. references. index.,
Library Journal
Mutiny! The word itself has struck fear into the hearts of naval officers since the inception of organized navies. Yet, as Guttridge demonstrates in this narrative history of modern mutinies, there still is no precise definition of mutiny or mutinous behavior. Beginning with mutiny in the navy of England's George I (1714-27), the author ( Icebound , LJ 6/1/86) provides detailed and fascinating descriptions of such famous mutinies as the Bounty , the Somers, and the Potemkin . He examines modern occurrences, such as those on United States aircraft carriers during the Vietnam War, and discusses the connection between mutiny and morale as a fitting conclusion. This is a fascinating study of law, discipline, and morale as they interact at sea from a historical perspective. Highly recommended for public and academic libraries.-- Harold N. Boyer, Marple P.L., Broomall, Pa.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780870212819
Publisher:
Naval Institute Press
Publication date:
02/29/2000
Pages:
318
Product dimensions:
6.29(w) x 9.23(h) x 1.20(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author


Leonard F. Guttridge is the author of numerous books, including the widely acclaimed Icebound: The Jeannette Expedition's Quest for the North Pole. He died in 2009 at the age of 90.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews