My America: Flying Free: Corey's Underground Railroad Diary, Book Two

Overview


In this sequel to My America: Freedom's Wings, Corey Birdsong and his family have escaped slavery and the South and found refuge in Canada. This book is part of the re-launch of the My America series.

In Sharon Dennis Wyeth's sequel to My America: Freedom's Wings, Corey and his family have escaped from slavery and the South and are now living in Canada. They own their own land, have made new friends, and Corey gets ready to go to school. But danger still remains across the ...

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Overview


In this sequel to My America: Freedom's Wings, Corey Birdsong and his family have escaped slavery and the South and found refuge in Canada. This book is part of the re-launch of the My America series.

In Sharon Dennis Wyeth's sequel to My America: Freedom's Wings, Corey and his family have escaped from slavery and the South and are now living in Canada. They own their own land, have made new friends, and Corey gets ready to go to school. But danger still remains across the river in Ohio, where slavecatchers lurk, waiting to capture escaped slaves to bring them back to their former masters. Corey, however, outsmarts them, and brings his friend Mingo to safety in Canada.

In 1858, nine-year-old Corey Birdsong and his family, fugitive slaves from Kentucky, build a new life in Amherstburg, Canada, while still hoping to help those they left behind.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Corey Birdsong and his family have reached freedom in Canada in this sequel to Freedom's Wings (not reviewed). His journal relates the last harrowing days of their flight from slavery, their feelings of rapture upon arrival, and the steps they take to forge a new, independent life. They are welcomed in a community that is made up largely of other former slaves. Here they dare to dream of owning their own farm, of proper schooling, of making their mark. Corey is fascinated by the people around him, and makes special note of the black people who have responsible, respected places in society. But they must always be aware that there are slave-catchers just over the water who are waiting for a chance to recapture the runaways and return them to slavery. And always in their hearts are the people they left behind, like Corey's best friend Mingo. Wyeth breathes full life into Corey. His voice is true and clear. He is loving, curious, intelligent, brave, and determined. He's thrilled by all the new sights, sounds, and experiences, and describes everything and everyone with delightful and insightful enthusiasm. There are many well-written works for children concerning daring and dangerous escapes along the Underground Railroad, but most end with the first steps into Canada. Here, finally, is a glimpse of what came next. Besides weaving many historically accurate facts within the story, Wyeth provides an interesting, informative afterword that includes period photographs. Fascinating.--Kirkus Reviews
In Patriots, Hope, 10, lives in Philadelphia in 1777. George Washington and his troops are nearby fighting the Redcoats, who capture the city and move into her home. Gregory engages readers with the tumultuous elements of conflict and war, making this book a page-turner. Flying follows Corey, 10, an escaped slave who is now forging a life as a free person in Canada with his family. With the exception of the rescue of his best friend, there is little excitement in this plotless, formulaic story. Also, Corey's facility with language doesn't ring true. The historical note at the end of each volume offers interesting facts and a few black-and-white photos. The large font size and short entries make these books quick and accessible to reluctant and good readers alike. Although not great literature, they may be popular historical-fiction choices for kids who are willing to suspend disbelief.--School Library Journal
Children's Literature
Part of the "My America" series, this is the continuation of former slave Corey Birdsong's story, set in Amherstburg, Canada, in 1858. The Birdsong family--Corey, his parents Roland and Angel, and his baby sister StarĀ¾have escaped from Kentucky via the Underground Railroad. They are given a home in the AME Nazrey Church, which was built by people of color. Slowly, the family makes friends and finds work in their new town, and Corey is sent to school. Not only is he lucky enough to be able to read and write, but his father has excellent grammar and spelling as well, and he helps Corey keep a diary to both preserve history and improve Corey's writing. Although Corey is grateful to live in a place where he can, as he says, walk where he pleases, all is not perfect. There are slave owners across the river in Ohio, and several of them are sending slave catchers into Amherstburg to retrieve their property. He also misses Mingo, the friend he left behind in Kentucky. They communicate and plan Mingo's escape using codes, indicating, for example, that Mingo should follow the North Star. In the end, this becomes a story of triumph and hope as Mingo finds his way to Canada and freedom and Corey aspires to become a teacher. Seven pages of historical notes from the author appear at the end of the diary, giving the reader some information about the Underground Railroad and life in Canada as a slave refugee. 2002, Scholastic, $8.95 and $4.99. Ages 8 to 11. Reviewer: Carlie Kraft
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-In Patriots, Hope, 10, lives in Philadelphia in 1777. George Washington and his troops are nearby fighting the Redcoats, who capture the city and move into her home. Gregory engages readers with the tumultuous elements of conflict and war, making this book a page-turner. Flying follows Corey, 10, an escaped slave who is now forging a life as a free person in Canada with his family. With the exception of the rescue of his best friend, there is little excitement in this plotless, formulaic story. Also, Corey's facility with language doesn't ring true. The historical note at the end of each volume offers interesting facts and a few black-and-white photos. The large font size and short entries make these books quick and accessible to reluctant and good readers alike. Although not great literature, they may be popular historical-fiction choices for kids who are willing to suspend disbelief.-Be Astengo, Alachua County Library, Gainesville, FL Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Corey Birdsong and his family have reached freedom in Canada in this sequel to Freedom's Wings (not reviewed). His journal relates the last harrowing days of their flight from slavery, their feelings of rapture upon arrival, and the steps they take to forge a new, independent life. They are welcomed in a community that is made up largely of other former slaves. Here they dare to dream of owning their own farm, of proper schooling, of making their mark. Corey is fascinated by the people around him, and makes special note of the black people who have responsible, respected places in society. But they must always be aware that there are slave-catchers just over the water who are waiting for a chance to recapture the runaways and return them to slavery. And always in their hearts are the people they left behind, like Corey's best friend Mingo. Wyeth breathes full life into Corey. His voice is true and clear. He is loving, curious, intelligent, brave, and determined. He's thrilled by all the new sights, sounds, and experiences, and describes everything and everyone with delightful and insightful enthusiasm. There are many well-written works for children concerning daring and dangerous escapes along the Underground Railroad, but most end with the first steps into Canada. Here, finally, is a glimpse of what came next. Besides weaving many historically accurate facts within the story, Wyeth provides an interesting, informative afterword that includes period photographs. Fascinating. (Historical fiction. 7-12)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780439369084
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 5/1/2002
  • Series: My America
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 112
  • Sales rank: 239,987
  • Age range: 7 - 10 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.28 (w) x 7.56 (h) x 0.32 (d)

Meet the Author


Sharon Dennis Wyeth has written nearly fifty books for children, including several books in the My America series. She is also a poet, and a member of the Cave Canem Fellowship for African-American Poets. She lives in Upper Montclair, New Jersey.
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2004

    It was GREAT!!

    I loved that book. It was so interesting that I did not want to put it down. I love the Dear America Series. I recommend you to buy this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2010

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