Sean McManus' American Struggle for Justice in Northern Ireland [NOOK Book]

Overview

For almost forty years, Fr Sean McManus has been at the heart of the Irish American campaign to pressurise the British government regarding injustice in Northern Ireland. This is a deeply personal account of how his lone voice mainstreamed Northern Ireland on Capitol Hill, after the Catholic Church removed him from Britain. He became ‘Britain’s nemesis in America’, founding the Irish National Caucus in 1974. Also chronicles the events and social context that influenced him, growing up in a parish divided by the ...

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Sean McManus' American Struggle for Justice in Northern Ireland

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Overview

For almost forty years, Fr Sean McManus has been at the heart of the Irish American campaign to pressurise the British government regarding injustice in Northern Ireland. This is a deeply personal account of how his lone voice mainstreamed Northern Ireland on Capitol Hill, after the Catholic Church removed him from Britain. He became ‘Britain’s nemesis in America’, founding the Irish National Caucus in 1974. Also chronicles the events and social context that influenced him, growing up in a parish divided by the Border.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781848899315
  • Publisher: Collins Press, The
  • Publication date: 3/19/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 270
  • File size: 802 KB

Meet the Author

Fr Sean McManus, born in Kinawley, County Fermanagh, is a brother of Frank McManus, former MP, and Patrick McManus, an IRA member killed in an explosion in 1958. In 1971, McManus, a Redemptorist priest then based in Scotland, was arrested in Northern Ireland during an anti-internment demonstration. His superiors sent him to the United States in 1972 where he founded the Irish National Caucus in 1974, a Washington D.C.-based Irish-American lobby group.
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Read an Excerpt

For almost forty years, Fr Sean McManus has been at the heart of the Irish American campaign to pressurise the British government regarding injustice in Northern Ireland. This is a deeply personal account of how his lone voice mainstreamed Northern Ireland on Capitol Hill, after the Catholic Church removed him from Britain. He became ‘Britain’s nemesis in America’, founding the Irish National Caucus in 1974. Also chronicles the events and social context that influenced him, growing up in a parish divided by the Border.

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 28, 2011

    REPLY TO IRISH TIMES REVIEW

    Dear Madam, If Oscar Wilde's maxim is right - "The only thing worse than being talked about is not being talked about "-- then , I guess, from the point of view of my book, I should not be too concerned about Richard English's review of my Memoirs, My American Struggle for Justice in Northern Ireland. The main thrust of his review, "Righteously right in Irish America"(May 21) is that my book, "really focuses on human-rights abuses only as practiced by the UK and the unionists. It does not dwell, for example, on the IRA's abuse of humans and violation of their rights in the Troubles". Get real, Mr. English. The IRA was not a government, with which the US had diplomatic relations. Mr. English would be the first to argue that the IRA actions were criminal and the police must handle crime. Why, then, should I spend 40 years lobbying the US Congress on crime? What could the Congress do about the IRA? Ban the sale of US weapons to them as we had done to the RUC in 1979? Vote to refuse FBI training to any IRA member who had been involved in human rights violations - as we had done to the police? Could Congress, perhaps, have recalled the US Ambassador to the IRA? One only has to raise these hypotheticals to show the invalidity of Mr. English's position. My job was to get the US to put pressure on the British government. When the IRA becomes the government of Ireland, and violates human rights, then I will lobby the US to put pressure on them. Hope that keeps Mr. English happy. Mr. English also claims "McManus's book also displays no sense of respect for the political rights of unionists." Yet informed readers have remarked that my book does not contain one sectarian sentence, is very ecumenical.Indeed, I state in my book that I believe , " every good Catholic needs a good dose of Protestantism". But most importantly, Mr. English conveniently ignores that I devote the entire last chapter to the " political rights" of the brave Unionist/Protestant, Raymond Mc Cord of Belfast. As regards Mr. English's barb that I present myself as, " righteously right". Let me first say that only God is righteous. And for all my many faults, self-righteousness is not one of them. Maybe Mr. English is here feeding into the stereotype that anything to do with America is fundamentalist and self-righteous. He writes, " Mc Manus's book is a lightly written account of his campaigns". " Lightly" hardly computes with self-righteousness, which is heavy and moody. But that aside, he is correct that my book gives an account of my campaigns: to get President Jimmy Carter to speak up for Irish human rights, to ban the sale of US weapons to the RUC, Special Envoy for Northern Ireland, visas for Irish Republicans, the MacBride Principles, etc. My format for giving the account of all those "campaigns" is, naturally, to also mention those who opposed them -- otherwise the accounts would be totally lacking, and I would have had no " struggle". However, Mr. English then unfairly goes on to conflate that into: "As a result, My American Struggle for Justice in Northern Ireland ends up being less persuasive than it might have been. And it tends to present other Irish people as having been repeatedly wrong during the past 40 years, while McManus himself emerges again and again as having been righteously right. Unionists are (of course) presented as misguided. But so, in many of the pages of this very readable book, are Irish governments, the republican movement, John

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2013

    Dawnlight

    My den.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2011

    A Significant Memoir and History of Modern Irish Nationalism in America

    Using primary sources this book chronicles the work of the Irish National Caucus in Washington D.C. during the height of the war in Northern Ireland in 1970, to the present. Of particular interest is the documentary evidence that Senators Edward Kennedy (D-MA), Patrick Moynihan (D-NY), Congressman Thomas P. O'Neill (D-MA), and NY Gov. Hugh Carey, did everything they could at the behest of the Irish Government to thwart Irish-Americans in their pursuit of equality and fair employment for their compatriots back in Northern Ireland.

    Thousands of lives might have been saved if these "Four Horseman" had had the courage to stand up to the British and Irish governments in the advancement of justice in Ireland. Fr. Sean McManus provides proof that it was American elected representatives of various backgrounds, Italian, Jewish, African-American, Mormon, and others that ultimately brought the fair employment MacBride Principles into US law in spite of those big four so-called Irishman. This book is a fascinating account of events by the man who created the first modern Irish lobbying organization on Capital Hill and beat the British and Irish governments at their own game.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2011

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