My Beastly Brother

My Beastly Brother

by Laura Leuck, Scott Nash
     
 

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There are lots of things this beastly brother does to annoy his younger brother. After all, there are games that involve poison ivy and hide-and-shriek! But beastly or not, this big brother is not as mean and tough as he seems.

Laura Leuck's frolicking rhyme about a sibling relationship is matched perfectly with Scott Nash's awfully fun illustrations.  See more details below

Overview

There are lots of things this beastly brother does to annoy his younger brother. After all, there are games that involve poison ivy and hide-and-shriek! But beastly or not, this big brother is not as mean and tough as he seems.

Laura Leuck's frolicking rhyme about a sibling relationship is matched perfectly with Scott Nash's awfully fun illustrations.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
Squabbling siblings may recognize themselves in the two fur-covered brothers who feud in this flawed tale. The younger monster catalogues the injustices: "My beastly brother's mean and tough./ He always hides his spooky stuff,/ and never lets me feed his rat/ or hang around his vampire bat." Nash (Over the Moon) styles the brothers with claws, fangs and hairy, coconut-like heads, but their issues are universal-and the monster twist makes the lesson easier to swallow. The older brother shows off his superior "casketball" skills and drops "worms and ants... down my underpants," but eventually the narrator softens, remembering his brother's kindness when he has "a scary dream/ and wake[s] up with a frightened scream." (His nightmare is of a smiling human family.) Leuck (One Witch, reviewed above) serves up a steady beat of humorous, monster-inspired verse, although with less originality than in her My Monster Mama Loves Me, and with at times muddied human-monster contrasts (e.g., wouldn't monsters like flies in their underpants?). Occasionally, the illustrations further the confusion: the conservatively dressed monsters-who, amusingly, appear to live in a suburban tract home-don't really look that different from the "nightmare" humans. Alert readers, though, will relish batty details like eyeball-print wallpaper, a skull-patterned sofa and a framed picture of a hacked-down tree. Ages 3-6. (Aug.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
In this tale of how a young monster considers both the good and the bad sides of his relationship with his older brother, it's hard not to wonder if the author and illustrator are striving to replicate the tone and wild imaginings in Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are. We see strange creatures everywhere and even a nighttime scene of being fearful in the dark amidst the shadows of one's bedroom. This picture book is written in the singsong type of rhyme that children's book editors constantly insist they will not publish. The overriding theme is that brothers are to be appreciated, even with the personality traits and negative behavior that could lead one to have doubts about them. Some of the vocabulary�"spider spit," a loud "BURP," "underpants"�may appeal to the book's young readers (especially the boys). The illustrations are lively and bright, giving a sense of action and inviting the reader to turn the pages. 2003, HarperCollins Publishers, Ages 4 to 8.
— Susan Schott Karr
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-A young monster describes his relationship with his older brother, who is better at almost everything: "He loves to show that he can chew/the biggest gob of Bubble Goo,/that he can sip and suck and slurp,/and belch the biggest bug-juice- burp!" He excels at "casketball," wrestles his little brother into the poison ivy, and forces him to be "it" during "hide-and-shriek." However, he is always there to provide comfort after a bad dream. Some of the details of monster life are specified in the rhyming text, while others are depicted in the bold and colorful illustrations. Unfortunately, the characters look like fur-covered wooden puppets of humans with few beastly characteristics other than their fangs. There are many better tales about sibling relationships, and many monster books that are more appealing. With mediocre artwork and nothing unique to make it rise above the crowd, this story is second rate.-Nancy A. Gifford, Schenectady County Public Library, NY Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060295486
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
08/05/2003
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.32(w) x 9.31(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
5 - 6 Years

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