MY BONDAGE and MY FREEDOM [NOOK Book]

Overview

INTRODUCTION


When a man raises himself from the lowest condition in society to
the highest, mankind pay him the tribute of their admiration; when he
accomplishes this...
See more details below
MY BONDAGE and MY FREEDOM

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$0.99
BN.com price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

INTRODUCTION


When a man raises himself from the lowest condition in society to
the highest, mankind pay him the tribute of their admiration; when he
accomplishes this elevation by native energy, guided by prudence and
wisdom, their admiration is increased; but when his course, onward and
upward, excellent in itself, furthermore proves a possible, what had
hitherto been regarded as an impossible, reform, then he becomes a
burning and a shining light, on which the aged may look with gladness,
the young with hope, and the down-trodden, as a representative of
what they may themselves become. To such a man, dear reader, it is my
privilege to introduce you.

The life of Frederick Douglass, recorded in the pages which follow,
is not merely an example of self-elevation under the most adverse
circumstances; it is, moreover, a noble vindication of the highest aims
of the American anti-slavery movement. The real object of that movement
is not only to disenthrall, it is, also, to bestow upon the Negro the
exercise of all those rights, from the possession of which he has been
so long debarred.

But this full recognition of the colored man to the right, and the
entire admission of the same to the full privileges, political,
religious and social, of manhood, requires powerful effort on the part
of the enthralled, as well as on the part of those who would disenthrall
them. The people at large must feel the conviction, as well as admit the
abstract logic, of human equality;{5} the Negro, for the first time in
the world's history, brought in full contact with high civilization,
must prove his title first to all that is demanded for him; in the teeth
of unequal chances, he must prove himself equal to the mass of those who
oppress him--therefore, absolutely superior to his apparent fate, and
to their relative ability. And it is most cheering to the friends of
freedom, today, that evidence of this equality is rapidly accumulating,
not from the ranks of the half-freed colored people of the free states,
but from the very depths of slavery itself; the indestructible equality
of man to man is demonstrated by the ease with which black men, scarce
one remove from barbarism--if slavery can be honored with such a
distinction--vault into the high places of the most advanced and
painfully acquired civilization. Ward and Garnett, Wells Brown and
Pennington, Loguen and Douglass, are banners on the outer wall, under
which abolition is fighting its most successful battles, because
they are living exemplars of the practicability of the most radical
abolitionism; for, they were all of them born to the doom of slavery,
some of them remained slaves until adult age, yet they all have not
only won equality to their white fellow citizens, in civil, religious,
political and social rank, but they have also illustrated and adorned
our common country by their genius, learning and eloquence.

The characteristics whereby Mr. Douglass has won first rank among these
remarkable men, and is still rising toward highest rank among living
Americans, are abundantly laid bare in the book before us. Like the
autobiography of Hugh Miller, it carries us so far back into early
childhood, as to throw light upon the question, "when positive and
persistent memory begins in the human being." And, like Hugh Miller, he
must have been a shy old-fashioned child, occasionally oppressed by what
he could not well account for, peering and poking about among the layers
of right and wrong, of tyrant and thrall, and the wonderfulness of that
hopeless tide of things which brought power to one race, and unrequited
toil to another, until, finally, he stumbled upon{6} his "first-found
Ammonite," hidden away down in the depths of his own nature, and which
revealed to him the fact that liberty and right, for all men, were
anterior to slavery and wrong. When his knowledge of the world was
bounded by the visible horizon on Col. Lloyd's plantation, and while
every thing around him bore a fixed, iron stamp, as if it had always
been so, this was, for one so young, a notable discovery.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940012263964
  • Publisher: SAP
  • Publication date: 3/2/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 349 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 27 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(14)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(6)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 27 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2011

    I'm sure it is a great book - if I was able to read it.

    I recently saw a short documentary about Frederick Douglass on PBS where I learned of his autobiography. After that I went to search for it and was happy to find it as an electronic e-book and a free version.
    I don't really know how this electronic version was made but a lot of it is unreadable. A lot of words and sometimes whole sections are garbled. It is still readable if you don't mind occasionally guessing a word or 10. Most of the Chapter titles are not readable at all.
    I am new to e-books and I guess maybe you do get what you pay for. Although I am hesitant to buy a version of this book because of fears that it will be garbled as well.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2011

    Fredrick+Douglass+

    This+book+is+a+must+read+by+all+black+youth+and+adults+to+have+a+better+understanding+of+the+black+struggle+and+we%27re+still+not+there+yet.

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2013

    An Eye Opener!

    I found My Bondage My Freedom to be a very fascinating book. Mr.Douglass' discriptions of his experiences as slave, were an eye opener to me of the horrible injustices our country inflicted upon the African people.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2013

    gq

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2013

    Douglass is very bravve

    My friend reasearched him for 2 MONTHS! I know wayyy more about him then I ever wanted to know, since my friend is the talkative kind

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2012

    Classic

    Must read for everyone.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2011

    Bad Scan

    Bad Scan

    Like so many of the free books available for the Nook, this scan is very poor. Pagination and printing is off. It may be a good book, but the edition fails as an ebook.

    It is not worth the trouble, and I am deleting it.

    I guess you really do get what you pay for¿

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 27 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)