My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method
  • My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method
  • My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method
  • My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method
  • My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method
  • My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method
  • My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method
  • My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method
  • My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method
  • My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method
  • My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method
  • My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method
<Previous >Next

My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method

4.1 29
by Jim Lahey
     
 

Lahey’s “breathtaking, miraculous, no-work, no-knead bread” (Vogue) has revolutionized the food world.

When he wrote about Jim Lahey’s bread in the New York Times, Mark Bittman’s excitement was palpable: “The loaf is incredible, a fine-bakery quality, European-style boule that is produced

See more details below

Overview

Lahey’s “breathtaking, miraculous, no-work, no-knead bread” (Vogue) has revolutionized the food world.

When he wrote about Jim Lahey’s bread in the New York Times, Mark Bittman’s excitement was palpable: “The loaf is incredible, a fine-bakery quality, European-style boule that is produced more easily than by any other technique I’ve used, and it will blow your mind.” Here, thanks to Jim Lahey, New York’s premier baker, is a way to make bread at home that doesn’t rely on a fancy bread machine or complicated kneading techniques. Witnessing the excitement that Bittman’s initial piece unleashed worldwide among bakers experienced and beginner alike, Jim grew convinced that home cooks were eager for a no-fuss way to make bread, and so now, in this eagerly anticipated collection of recipes, Jim shares his one-of-a-kind method for baking rustic, deep-flavored bread in your own oven.

The secret to Jim Lahey’s bread is slow-rise fermentation. As Jim shows in My Bread, with step-by-step instructions followed by step-by-step pictures, the amount of labor you put in amounts to 5 minutes: mix water, flour, yeast, and salt, and then let time work its magic—no kneading necessary. Wait 12 to 18 hours for the bread to rise, developing structure and flavor; then, after another short rise, briefly bake the bread in a covered cast-iron pot.

The process couldn’t be more simple, or the results more inspiring. My Bread devotes chapters to Jim’s variations on the basic loaf, including an olive loaf, pecorino cheese bread, pancetta rolls, the classic Italian baguette (stirato), and the stunning bread stick studded with tomatoes, olives, or garlic (stecca). He gets even more creative with loaves like Peanut Butter and Jelly Bread, others that use juice instead of water, and his Irish Brown Bread, which calls for Guinness stout. For any leftover loaves, Jim includes what to do with old bread (try bread soup or a chocolate torte) and how to make truly special sandwiches.

And no book by Jim Lahey would be complete without his Sullivan Street Bakery signature, pizza Bianca—light, crispy flatbread with olive oil and rosemary that Jim has made even better than that of Italy’s finest bakeries. Other pizza recipes, like a pomodoro (tomato), only require you to spread the risen dough across a baking sheet and add toppings before baking.

Here—finally—Jim Lahey gives us a cookbook that enables us to fit quality bread into our lives at home.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Mark Bittman - New York Times
“Mr. Lahey's method is creative and smart.... What makes Mr. Lahey's process revolutionary is the resulting combination of great crumb, lightness, incredible flavor—long fermentation gives you that—and an enviable, crackling crust, the feature of bread that most frequently separates amateurs from the pros.... With just a little patience, you will be rewarded with the best no-work bread you have ever made.”
Anthony Bourdain
“Jim Lahey's My Bread expands on his no-knead, bread-in-a-pot method, a revolutionary development that allows even once-hopeless bakers like me to produce wonderful loaves of thick-crusted goodness. In the professional arena, Jim is the acknowledged master of bread, dough, and crust. Chefs, foodies, and food nerds flock to his bakery and to his pizza joint. He is to bread what the Dalai Lama is to Buddhism.”
Mario Batali
“Rustic. Simple. Italian. Divine. I was hooked on Jim's bread from the very first taste of my first Sullivan Street loaf. He is truly the zen-master of bread baking.”
Jeffrey Steingarten - Vogue
“The secret to making a foolproof, nearly labor-free loaf that tastes as delicious as anything from a baker..... [Lahey] is the most intuitive bread baker I have ever met.”
Corby Kummer - The Atlantic
“Jim Lahey... opened the Sullivan St Bakery in 1994 selling breads that no one in the city had made before.... Sullivan St became the name to look and ask for, and... became... the place to go for the incredibly airy, oil-brushed, lightly salted pizza Bianca, which is even better than that of the bakery in Rome's Campo de' Fiori.”
Frank Bruni - New York Times
“It's bread above all that [Lahey] knows and loves.... The man can do wonders with flour and water, massaged or not.... He can do fluffy, crunchy, supple, dense. He can do pizza Bianca—man, oh man, can he do pizza Bianca—those salty squares of almost entirely naked crust.”
Christine Muhlke
Lahey offers a few spins on his flawless boule: carrot bread, coconut-chocolate bread, olive bread, fennel-raisin bread. And there are recipes for things to make with said bread, fresh and stale. But the second-best thing about this book is that Lahey demystifies the pizzas that made his name when he opened his first bakery in SoHo.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
While the subtitle sounds like a late-night television infomercial, Lahey's quick bread-in-a-pot method garnered attention from foodies and critics after appearing in Mark Bittman's New York Times article. With co-writer Flaste, founding editor of the New York Times's dining section, Lahey, founder of the Sullivan Street Bakery and the New York pizzeria Co., presents his touted no-knead bread recipe, along with a collection of recipes building on the method. With only five minutes of labor (along with 12–18 hours of waiting/rising time), the authors promise the results of artisanal Italian-inspired bread. Lahey's down-to-earth tone and straightforward technique, along with instructional photographs lead home bakers through chapters including “Specialties of the House,” with such recipes as coconut-chocolate bread and pancetta bread; “Beyond Water,” breads made with carrot or apple juices and peanut butter; and “Pizzas and Foccacias,” featuring less-than-traditional toppings such as celery root, cauliflower and fennel pizzas. Additional sections on building sandwiches and what to do with stale bread—everything from soup to dessert—round out this innovative title. (Oct.)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393066302
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
10/05/2009
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
143,023
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.10(h) x 1.10(d)

Related Subjects

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >