My Brother Ron: A Personal and Social History of the Deinstitutionalization of the Mentally Ill

My Brother Ron: A Personal and Social History of the Deinstitutionalization of the Mentally Ill

4.5 2
by Clayton Cramer
     
 

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America started a grand experiment in the 1960s: deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill. The consequences were very destructive: homelessness; a degradation of urban life; increases in violent crime rates; increasing death rates for the mentally ill. My Brother Ron tells the story of deinstitutionalization from two points of view: what happened to the author's

Overview

America started a grand experiment in the 1960s: deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill. The consequences were very destructive: homelessness; a degradation of urban life; increases in violent crime rates; increasing death rates for the mentally ill. My Brother Ron tells the story of deinstitutionalization from two points of view: what happened to the author's older brother, part of the first generation of those who became mentally ill after deinstitutionalization, and a detailed history of how and why America went down this path.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940014588522
Publisher:
Clayton E. Cramer
Publication date:
06/23/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
260
File size:
583 KB

Meet the Author

Clayton E. Cramer teaches history at the College of Western Idaho and works as a software engineer. His work has been cited in two U.S. Supreme Court cases, as well as numerous decisions of the lower courts.

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My Brother Ron: A Personal and Social History of the Deinstitutionalization of the Mentally Ill 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's not a topic you'd immediately think would hold much interest - a history of how the US has handled mental illness over its history, and the reasons and effects of the post-sixties deinstitutionalization craze. But you'd be surprised. It's well written, well researched, and help together by reminiscences of the authors own experiences dealing with mental illness in his own family.