My Bunny and Me

My Bunny and Me

5.0 1
by Lindsay Barrett George, Lindsay B. George
     
 

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Just as vividly as he can see and feel the drawing he's making of a bunny with dark brown eyes and long floppy ears, so can Luis imagine what they would do together if that bunny were real. Like any two friends, they would explore the world around them, or simply have quiet time to just be. Lindsay Barrett George's extraordinary painting s illustrate this spare,…  See more details below

Overview

Just as vividly as he can see and feel the drawing he's making of a bunny with dark brown eyes and long floppy ears, so can Luis imagine what they would do together if that bunny were real. Like any two friends, they would explore the world around them, or simply have quiet time to just be. Lindsay Barrett George's extraordinary painting s illustrate this spare, emotionally rich story of a boy with a boundless imagination and an even bigger heart—a boy who comes to understand that the greatest gift for any living thing is the gift of freedom.

About the Author:
Lindsay Barrett George's critically acclaimed books include the "Who's Been Here" series and the "Long Pond" series. She lives in White Mills, PA.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
What would a young boy do with a pet bunny? Luis ponders these things while admiring a drawing he made of a rabbit. He and his new pet would play and laugh together. Luis would let the rabbit hide in the yard and then have fun looking for it. He would read it stories and at night he would point out the constellations. He would also hold his pet bunny close and give him hugs. Then, Luis decides that if the rabbit really were alive, he would bravely let it go to live in freedom and peace with other rabbits. The illustrations are large and colorful and will surely captivate the attention of young readers. 2001, Greenwillow Books/HarperCollins, $15.95 and $15.89. Ages 4 to 8. Reviewer: Denise Daley
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-K-While staring at his childlike rendering of a rabbit, young Luis imagines what would happen if his creation were real. His list of potential activities is simple and modest in scale. It includes the duo looking at their reflections, digging a burrow, climbing a tree, and staring at the night sky. Finally, the boy realizes that his affection for the bunny would in fact require him to set the wild creature free rather than confine him to a human domain. Bold gouache paintings portray a realistically rendered youngster set against a backdrop of naive art. These juxtapositions combined with an inventive use of perspective in some of the frames make for a dynamism and visual interest that is not quite matched by the slight text.-Rosalyn Pierini, San Luis Obispo City-County Library, CA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
PLB: 0-688-16075-1 A spare text accompanies and somewhat overburdens an intriguing visual tale about art and imagination presented in vivid, warm, full-color, and full-page gouache paintings. The endpapers and opening pages show a collection of simple, childlike pictures of rabbits. The story then moves on to show the rabbit artist, a boy of about ten (his signature on his drawings indicates that his name is Luis), cuddling his bunny, now transformed into a winsome live creature, in a landscape of childlike drawings of flowers, grass, trees, and house."If you were real, we could do lots of things together," the brief text begins. Then the boy and the"real" bunny are shown together over the next few pages and their actions described in several lines of text: playing in the yard, reading a book, gazing at the night sky, and cuddling quietly."But if you were really real, what I would do . . . is let you go," concludes the narrator, somewhat startlingly, since the bunny has been up to now treated as a pet. By letting us into Luis's daydream where his drawing comes to life, George, a nature illustrator (Around the World: Who's Been Here?, 1999, etc.) has attempted an interesting observation about the ways we can (and cannot) hold onto the things we create, but the result is somewhat muddled. The text seems to intrude, providing a narrative that might best be supplied by the reader. Luis looks a few years older than his rabbit-drawings might suggest. The lovely tactile bunny and handsome child will be enough for some readers; other children just learning to draw what they love may feel vaguely patronized by the mixture of childlike drawing and impressive"real" bunny andboy.(Picture book. 3-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688160746
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/28/2001
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.34(w) x 12.30(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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My Bunny and Me 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My son who recently turned eight last month had this book in his collection and we read it together. Then, as the plot suggests, my son actually FOUND a domesticated black rex rabbit in a parking lot resting under a car just before his birthday. The boy in this book, Luis, wishes for drawings of his rabbit to come to life - and then my son finds a real rabbit. The book is great on its own but also seemed to make a wish come true for a young reader who's been wanting a rabbit.