My Dam Life

My Dam Life

3.5 2
by Sean Condon
     
 
In Sean & David's Long Drive he careered around Australia with his laconic pal David in a retro Ford Falcon. In Drive Thru America he and David cruised the States in a very uncool Chrysler Neon.

Now Australian humorist Sean Condon is married and living in Amsterdam - jobless, homeless, careless and Dave-less. In My 'Dam Life he casts a witty,

Overview

In Sean & David's Long Drive he careered around Australia with his laconic pal David in a retro Ford Falcon. In Drive Thru America he and David cruised the States in a very uncool Chrysler Neon.

Now Australian humorist Sean Condon is married and living in Amsterdam - jobless, homeless, careless and Dave-less. In My 'Dam Life he casts a witty, watchful and wonderfully self-deprecating eye over his expat experience of laziness and leisure, dreams and destiny in the Venice of the North.

With his uncanny ability to seek out the absurd in everyday life, Sean finds plenty of targets in a city of hemp and high culture, canals and bicycles, idiosyncratic plumbing and internationally unrenowned cuisine. My 'Dam Life strikes a hilarious chord with anyone who has followed their dream of starting a new life abroad.

Editorial Reviews

San Francisco Chronicle
...a smart and funny book
— San Francisco Chronicle
Library Journal - Library Journal
In spring 1999, former advertising copywriter and journalist Condon (Sean and David's Long Drive) and his wife, Sally, a magazine editor, left Melbourne, Australia, for her new posting in Amsterdam. Their subsequent three-year sojourn is distilled in this travel memoir. Playing urban anthropologist, Condon actively investigated Amsterdam's laissez-faire approach to sex and soft drugs. Holland, he discovered, has a traditionally strong international entrepreneurial spirit, yet this commercial expansiveness belies a collective folk insularity that breeds xenophobia and racism. Consequently, Condon was frequently denied a work permit. When not bemoaning his idleness and joblessness, Condon describes encounters or interviews with faux celebrities (Xaviera Hollander, Roger Moore, Monica Lewinsky). The results are neither interesting nor enlightening, as Condon's interviewing technique is akin to late-night talk-show buffoonery. Despite an energetic and humorous style, Condon's book has a mocking, self-serving, and flippant tone that thwarts what might have been an engaging scrutiny of Dutch customs and mores. Not recommended.-Lonnie Weatherby, McGill Univ., Montreal Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780864427816
Publisher:
Lonely Planet Publications
Publication date:
02/28/2003
Series:
Journeys Ser.
Pages:
248
Product dimensions:
5.28(w) x 7.78(h) x 0.70(d)

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My Dam Life 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Just got back from Amsterdam and bought this book at the RijksMuseum. Mr. Condon tries to be clever and fails. He could take a lesson from Bill Bryson's hilarious books. It's basically all about Mr. Condon and it gets tedious and boring. Too bad.Was disappointing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book and found a laugh on every page. True, this isn't your typical 'travel book.' If you want endless descriptions of local markets and the sun that shines down on them, there are more than enough out there to choose from already. Sean Condon's account of his years in Amsterdam is the story of a REAL (by which I mean not filthy rich and retired before 50) person who has packed up his life and changed cultures; a person with money problems, employment issues, serious difficulties with the language and a slightly unnatural longing for his left-behind PlayStation. Above all else, though, this story is told with true wit and style. The unpalatable food, the incomprehensible advertising, the too-tempting shots of genever and roadside doughnut vendors - it's all hilarious. The story of Condon and his fellow ad-men flying to California to stalk Francis Ford Coppola in the hopes of having him say a little something for an agency promo (a successful venture, I might add) is worth the cover price all by itself. I live in Provence, and man, I wish Sean Condon was here.