My Detachment: A Memoir

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Overview

My Detachment is a war story like none you have ever read before, an unromanticized portrait of a young man coming of age in the controversial war that defined a generation. In an astonishingly honest, comic, and moving account of his tour of duty in Vietnam, master storyteller Tracy Kidder writes for the first time about himself. This extraordinary memoir is destined to become a classic.

Kidder was an ROTC intelligence officer, just months out of college and expecting a ...

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My Detachment: A Memoir

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Overview

My Detachment is a war story like none you have ever read before, an unromanticized portrait of a young man coming of age in the controversial war that defined a generation. In an astonishingly honest, comic, and moving account of his tour of duty in Vietnam, master storyteller Tracy Kidder writes for the first time about himself. This extraordinary memoir is destined to become a classic.

Kidder was an ROTC intelligence officer, just months out of college and expecting a stateside assignment, when his orders arrived for Vietnam. There, lovesick, anxious, and melancholic, he tried to assume command of his detachment, a ragtag band of eight more-or-less ungovernable men charged with reporting on enemy radio locations.

He eventually learned not only to lead them but to laugh and drink with them as they shared the boredom, pointlessness, and fear of war. Together, they sought a ghostly enemy, homing in on radio transmissions and funneling intelligence gathered by others. Kidder realized that he would spend his time in Vietnam listening in on battle but never actually experiencing it.

With remarkable clarity and with great detachment, Kidder looks back at himself from across three and a half decades, confessing how, as a young lieutenant, he sought to borrow from the tragedy around him and to imagine himself a romantic hero. Unrelentingly honest, rueful, and revealing, My Detachment gives us war without heroism, while preserving those rare moments of redeeming grace in the midst of lunacy and danger. The officers and men of My Detachment are not the sort of people who appear in war movies–they are the ones who appear only in war, and they are unforgettable.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Tracy Kidder went to Vietnam as a reluctant warrior. In fact, the future Pulitzer Prize winner joined ROTC in his junior year at Harvard as a strategy to avoid the draft's uncertainties and the "unnecessary, futile, racist" war. Once in Nam, he assumed command over an anarchistic group of work-shirking enlisted men. His unit's mission was to interpret enemy troop movements from raw intelligence gathered via electronic eavesdropping. This singular memoir is devoid of battlefield heroics but captures the incongruities and abstractness of everyday wartime experience.
Klingenborg Verlyn
The older Kidder almost never relents toward his younger self. The reader is inclined to be a little more forgiving, if only because the worst of Lieutenant Kidder's reported sins are so youthful and venial, so familiar to any honest reader. But there is something else at work here, too. By being tough on his young self, Kidder knows, I think, that no one will laugh too hard at the man he used to be, who would have been wounded most by laughter. And yet if you refract the irony of this memoir a little differently, the result is high comedy. This absurdly earnest young man is guilty of not much more than being young and absurd.
— The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
The author of The Soul of a New Machine put in a year during the Vietnam War; he was a reluctant warrior. Kidder joined ROTC in his junior year at Harvard as a way of avoiding the draft's uncertainties. Two years later he was taking part in a war that he found "unnecessary, futile, racist," serving as a lieutenant commanding an Army Security Agency detachment of eight enlisted men inside a well-fortified infantry base camp. As a shaved-headed ROTC cadet and later as an army officer, Kidder felt "separated from my social class, from my student generation"; in Vietnam, he detached himself emotionally from the mind-numbing army bureaucracy, from his ticket-punching career officer superiors and from his iconoclastic, work-shirking enlisted men. For Kidder, there are no heroes, and, in fact, few "war stories"; he presents, instead, realistic day-to-day reports on what happened to him at his posting: the mission was to interpret enemy troop movements using raw intelligence data supplied by eavesdropping technology. His account is an introspective, demythologizing dose of reality seen through the eyes of a perceptive, though immature, army intelligence lieutenant at a rear-area base camp. War isn't hell here; it's "an abstraction, dots on a map." Agent, Georges Borchardt. (Sept. 13) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Pulitzer Prize winner Kidder (The Soul of a New Machine) turns his great gift for narrative nonfiction to his own life and tells of his year in Vietnam as a young army officer. Far from a blood-and-guts memoir, Kidder's story is one of painful self-revelation and amusing coming of age. He recounts how he joined the ROTC as a confused Harvard student, even as his opinions were turning against the war, and ended up in a not very dangerous corner of Vietnam monitoring radio patterns. His attempts to command his detachment of bored enlisted men and his letters home, which were full of fictional heroics, could have been the stuff of tragedy, but Kidder's storytelling and humor are able to do much more. His unflinching honesty is tempered by his amusement at his younger self, and the green lieutenant imperceptibly matures until he finds himself leaving Vietnam and the army as the man he had wished he could be. Highly recommended. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 5/1/05.]-Elizabeth Morris, Illinois Fire Service Inst. Lib., Champaign, IL Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A departure for Pulitzer Prize-winner Kidder (Mountains Beyond Mountains, 2003, etc.): a memoir recounting his time in Vietnam as a green lieutenant turned world-weary REMF. Fresh out of Robert Fitzgerald's creative writing seminar and the hip Cambridge scene, Harvard grad Kidder didn't want to go to Vietnam, and for a time it looked like he wouldn't have to-until the callow ROTC kid managed to irritate a colonel. Kidder finds himself dispatched in country to a behind-the-lines intelligence unit sorely short on the niceties of Army discipline. No sweat to him: "Why should I care if some of the men didn't shave some mornings or the jeep needed paint? I hadn't come here to harass troops. I opposed this war." (The book's nicely double-edged title says it all about his youthful self's attitude.) Even so, he meets with ribbing, scorn and near-mutiny from many of his men. They come to accept him, though, and even to straighten up a little bit when he responds to a night attack by turning out wearing "steel pot and flak jacket and .45"-and nothing else. In this short account, Kidder concentrates on the absurdities of Army life, relating episodes in which he figures as a Yossarian surrounded by strange people who seem not to understand that what they're doing is dangerous. The narrative, gracefully written and full of rueful, black humor, takes its time in gathering steam, but Kidder punctuates his leisurely account with zingers, like a scarifying letter to his onetime girlfriend, and bittersweet moments such as a visit to a Singapore brothel. Best of these is an encounter long after the war with one of his men, a Chicano boy who once reminded him in the field, "We can shoot you any time we want,Lieutenant." The kid made it back home, only to return to Vietnam with the CIA. A modest contribution compared to such classics such as Dispatches and A Rumor of War, but worthy of attention all the same.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780812976168
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/24/2006
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 993,640
  • Product dimensions: 5.28 (w) x 8.03 (h) x 0.46 (d)

Meet the Author

Tracy Kidder
Tracy Kidder graduated from Harvard and studied at the University of Iowa. He has won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the Robert F. Kennedy Award, and many other literary prizes. The author of Mountains Beyond Mountains, Home Town, Old Friends, Among Schoolchildren, House, and The Soul of a New Machine, Kidder lives in Massachusetts and Maine.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1
War Stories II

I am the author of Ivory Fields, a novel. I wrote it soon after I came home from Vietnam. Not many have read the book. After thirty-three publishers turned it down, I lit a fire in a trash barrel behind a rented house in Iowa and burned up all my copies of the manuscript. Years and years went by, and the book became a part of my distant memories of being a soldier, memories that would creep up on me when I was washing dishes or turning a key in a lock, memories that I wished away. Then one morning another copy of the novel arrived in the mail, from an old friend who was cleaning out his files, and I realized I was glad to have it back. From time to time I look at it, and I think. The protagonist of Ivory Fields is a strange, doomed young Army officer named Larry Dempsey. He's a second lieutenant, just as I was when I arrived in Vietnam in June 1968. But Lieutenant Dempsey is sent to Vietnam to lead an infantry platoon in combat. Whereas I commanded, in a manner of speaking, a detachment of eight enlisted men who performed an indoor sort of job, a classified mission called communications intelligence, in support of the 198th Light Infantry Brigade of the Americal Division. We belonged to the Army Security Agency, but in Vietnam we worked under the false though actually more descriptive name Radio Research.
I imagine this disguise was meant to confuse not only our enemies but also our friends who didn't have proper security clearances, but I don't know what difference it made. Our compounds were off limits to most American soldiers, and we never saw the Vietcong or North Vietnamese. At higher headquarters in Chu Lai and in small airplanes, other radio research soldiers listened in on the enemy's encrypted Morse code communications, and what they learned mainly locations was passed to my detachment, and passed on by me to the brigade commander. I remember an article in an overseas edition of Time that accurately described what units like ours were doing. I read the article in my hootch, in my detachment's compound, which was tucked inside the brigade's fortified base camp, Landing Zone Bayonet. The camp was situated at the edge of the coastal plain, at the base of the foothills of the central highlands, in the part of South Vietnam that the American authorities had labeled I Corps. I spent most of my year at lz Bayonet, inside the perimeter.
I remember watching a small group of American soldiers head out one evening. The selections that memory makes often puzzle me, but I probably remember seeing the patrol because it was the closest I ever got to the infantry in Vietnam. I was standing on the hill near my detachmentÕs antennas. I could see most of the base camp and to the west, out beyond the bunkers and barbed wire, green hills with taller hills like a wall behind them, and on a rock face in white paint, alpha 1Ú46 the gunfighters, the name of an infantry company that must have passed through in the course of the war and left that memento behind. The sun was setting on the hilltops, below great-chested clouds, and I was gazing out that way, glad to be apart from my men for a while, when I caught sight of the infantry patrol on one of the intervening hills, a group of olive-drab figures in procession, tiny at that distance, humpbacked beneath rucksacks. It would be dark soon. They were trudging away from the camp at an hour when I would have wanted to be heading in the opposite direction, toward hootches and beer and cots and mosquito nets and generators.
I had decided that this war was wrong. Not because of anything I had read recently or because of what I had seen so far. I opposed the war mainly because a lot of my friends were protesting against it back home. I watched the patrol with morbid fascination, with something like the feeling I used to get as a boy when I'd inch toward the edge of the roof of my grandmother's apartment building in New York, until the soldiers went over the hill in single file and disappeared. I was glad I wasn't going with them. But what if I had to? What if I enraged some field grade officer and for punishment got reassigned to the infantry? A fluttery sensation passed through my chest, and for a moment my hands felt weak. I imagined my civilian friends watching me. I imagined my girlfriend, Mary Anne. She might approve of my being less than gung ho, but not homesick and frightened. I had let some of those feelings slip into a few letters, and she had written me a sweet but keep-your-chin-up letter, in which she'd said, "Don't be so paranoid. I'd be more careful from now on. Soon my letters would suggest a stoical, even at times heroic young fellow. And after all, here I was, standing on the edge of the dangerous highlands under an operatic Asian sky, in a situation she ought to find poignant, a reluctant commander drawing hazardous duty pay.
I wandered down the hill, past our latrine, toward the enlisted men's hootches, and turned in at the one we had made into our lounge. Outside the screen door, I heard beer cans hissing open. I went inside as usual. Five or six of my men were sitting around the tv set, awaiting that eveningÕs episode of Combat! The title filled the screen: What Are the Bugles Blowin For? Sergeant Saunders's platoon has volunteered for a dangerous mission, which takes them, through the pouring rain, into a bombed-out village in France. The one kid left in the village joins up with them. He wants to fight the Krauts, too, because they killed his sister. He wants to get the man who did it, so he keeps checking the faces of the Krauts that Sergeant Saunders's squad guns down. Sergeant Saunders is brave and wise, and kind to children and women, especially nuns. I had a good sergeant, a buck sergeant in his early twenties, three stripes on the sleeves. His name was Stoney Spikes, and he came from Alabama. He had a strong face, with a big square chin, and the other men obeyed him. He kept one of his two pairs of jungle boots polished more or less, for the inspections we occasionally endured, which were for me almost a form of combat. The other pair he left unshined, at first perhaps because he saw no sense in shining them and later on, I think, because they made him feel more like the soldier he wished he was because a real soldier, an infantryman, a grunt, would never wear shiny boots in the bush. Spikes had gone away on leave and had run into some buck sergeants his age who had Combat Infantryman's Badges. "They got a name for people like us, Lieutenant," he told me when he came back. His jaw hardened. The term was remf. It stood for "Rear Echelon Mother Fucker." Spikes never seemed quite the same after he found out what real soldiers thought of soldiers like us.
In my memory, he sits forever in the lounge, at the end of another hot and dusty day. He opens a beer and tells the other men to hush as Combat! fills the tv screen, and he is dressed for the show in those sad, scuffed jungle boots. In a sense, I put on scuffed boots too, when I came home and began to write my novel about an infantry platoon and its lieutenant. Writing about experiences that I didn't have in Vietnam quieted real memories. A decade later, I had become a magazine writer. In 1978, still curious about those experiences that I had merely imagined, I traveled around the country, interviewing Vietnam combat veterans, to gather material for an article. And what a lot of strange and violent experience had been transported back into the United States, into jails and treatment centers and at least as often into houses on quiet, tree-lined streets. I met a former infantryman who remembered getting a black eye when a piece of his best friend's skull hit him in the face, a former combat medic who had finally weaned himself from morphine but still had lurid dreams about the men whose lives he hadn't saved, a government official who had lost an arm and both legs to a hand grenade, and dozens of others with terrible stories, all certifiable. Also, in Louisville, Kentucky, I met a man whom I'll call Bill, who told me a different kind of story, a tale about a tale.
In a bar one night, after listening to a bunch of other Vietnam veterans tell war stories, Bill had said, "We were ridin' on an apc outside Pleiku, when we got hit." Bill had told the barroom that he could still see those tracer rounds, like little red-tailed comets coming at them from the tree line, and the way his buddy who was sitting beside him on the armored personnel carrier slumped over and, as if in slow motion, fell by the side of the trail. Bill was scared, he told the bar. Fuckin' A, who wouldn't be? But that was his buddy, that was a GI lying wounded and dying back there on the trail. The captain, though, was yelling at the driver to di di mao. And Bill was yelling at the captain that they had to go back, and the coward told him to shut up and shouted at the driver again to move out. So afterward, back in base camp, the captain, to cover his ass, busted Bill to spec. 4, and Bill brooded and brooded and finally made up his mind to get payback. He had to kill the officer. He had to frag the lifer. Bill was sitting on a sofa in his parents' living room when he described himself telling that story. He said that he really did experience some moments of near combat in Vietnam, and that there really was a captain he wanted to kill, who busted him in rank. And in fact, Bill came home wounded. But his actual offense was repeated drunkenness, and he got his wound when he fell in a hole in a base camp and a friend, also stumbling drunk, fell in on top of him and broke his jaw. Bill had come home feeling miserable and had moved between the city's drunk tank and its barrooms, where he told his story again and again. It just came out one time, and it felt really good. Then each time I'd say it, I'd make it a little more glorified, Bill told me. "When I came home, the other veterans always had big wild stories, and I didnÕt have anything like theirs to tell. And theirs was probably as fictitious as mine. He looked down at his hands and seemed to smile at them. "It takes the place of things you didn't do. After a while, if you tell 'em enough, the ones people like to hear, you almost start to believe them."
When one considers the suffering of actual combatants and the much more numerous sufferings of Vietnamese civilians, it seems like sheer perversity for a rear-echelon soldier to come home wishing his experiences more dreadful than they were. But Bill was not alone. Most of the American soldiers who went to Vietnam were boys, whether they were twenty-two or just eighteen. They had watched a lot of movies and tv. I'm sure that many set out for Vietnam feeling confused or unhappy, as adolescents tend to do, and deep down many probably thought they would return with improved reasons for feeling that way. But of the roughly three million Americans who went to the war dressed as soldiers, only a small minority returned with Combat Infantryman's Badges, certain proof of a terrible experience. Imagine all the bullshit stories Vietnam inspired. My own wasn't exactly a story, just a freighted suggestion. I made it twice, the last time on a night in the mid-1970s. I got drunk at a Christmas party. Afterward, imagining that I'd been insulted by the various people I'd insulted there, I started crying angrily in the backseat of my car. A friend was driving. He asked me what was wrong, and I felt the need for a better explanation than the real one, whatever the real one was. My friend knew IÕd been in Vietnam. "Did you ever kill anyone, buddy?" I said. "No," he said. "Did you? "I don't want to talk about it." Ivory Fields was a more elaborate war story.
In late 1968, just back from Vietnam, I sat down at a table in my parents' house, and I began: When we were there things were on the increase, not the wane. The coonskin cap was still nailed on the walls of Cam Ranh Bay, so to speak. About this time is when the sad story begins. It is the saddest story you ever hope to hear. The Tabor's Sound II I think I expected readers to view my novel as autobiographical, and I was also beginning to sculpt my memories, looking for configurations that would make me more comfortable with them. I gave the lieutenant in Ivory Fields a Òpained and hawklike faceÓ and a sketchy past. His father isn't mentioned. His mother appears only briefly and is described as "once birdlike, but rounder poultry these days." No one who knew me could have imagined I meant to depict my own thin, beautiful, high-strung mother. Lieutenant Dempsey's experiences in the war are also very different, of course analogous to mine perhaps, but much more dramatic, the big shadows on the wall looming over me. For one thing, he gets shot to death. (He is done in by a conniving sergeant and giant black soldier named Ivory Fields; he dies while trying to protect, in his bumbling way, a Vietnamese girl whom his men have raped.) A reader might well think that the traits Dempsey and I had in common were fiction and at the same time imagine that some of Dempsey's fictional experiences resembled mine. Imagining the book's reception, I could see myself denying that I had suffered as he does. The more I demurred, the more the reader would think of me, He must have seen some stuff over there.
When my novel begins, Dempsey is already an infantry lieutenant on his way to Vietnam. He goes for patriotic reasons. He assumes the war is just. My case was more mystifying, at least to me. I grew up in the town of Oyster Bay, on the north shore of Long Island, at a time when the great suburban expansion had only just begun. Our house had been the gardener's cottage of a huge estate. It sat on several green acres, beside one of the island's last big hardwood forests. I spent what seems to me a very pleasant childhood playing with my two brothers and our friends at the foot of huge oaks and among pear trees and flowering dogwoods and on the waters of Long Island Sound. We carved our initials and later our first girlfriends' initials as well into the elephantlike skin of beech trees. I had a fierce temper as a child. Its eruptions sometimes made me climb into bed with my shoes on at midday. I had an equally fierce fear of the dark, which made real bedtimes dreadful, until I was ten or eleven and imaginary snakes stopped crawling up the gray stucco walls and through the window that looked out over the field in front of the house.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Table of Contents

War stories 3
The tabor's sound 10
Brave lieutenants 30
Pancho 49
Getting hit 69
Secret code word 89
R & R 106
Operations 125
Cassius 145
The death of Lieutenant Dempsey 164
Short 173
A visitor 181
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 6, 2011

    Honest

    Kidder applies his novelist like insightfulness of people and there place in the world to himself with this book. At times shockingly honest, Kidder's tale rings true for anyone who went to Vietnam or even knows a vet from that war. The transformation Kidder goes through from nervous but determined cherry el tee to a protector of his men from banal military bueracracy and those that enjoy making it that way is presented warts and all. By the end of the book you feel Kidder's satisfaction, jadedness and worry over handing off his detachment to a new cherry officer right along with him. While there are a number of good books about combat in Vietnam, Kidder's story fills a gap about how most soldiers experienced the war. Good stuff, and all the better for his unique story telling talents.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2008

    '...a young man in a morally desperate situation that everyone back home wants to forget...'

    The tone of Tracy Kidder's excellent memoir from his tour of duty in Vietnam in 1968 and 1968 is dour, full of resentment and disbelief in the value of war, and one of the stronger pacifist statements in book form. Rather than re-living the horrors of the Vietnam War and struggling to stay alive in a combat zone not marked by peripheries but rather by indistinct underground burrows where the ubiquitous 'enemy' remained hidden and disguised, Kidder's 'Detachment' was an Intelligence unit, for the most part safe from assault attack, but a unit that suffered the psychological destruction that accompanies an isolated band of men living in filthy conditions and always under the threat of 'inspection' by commanding officers seemingly more concerned with polished boots than by healthy mental states. Kidder, who never believed in the concept of the war in Vietnam, was a Lieutenant in charge of a small band of enlisted men whose job was to gather Intelligence to pass on to the war planners. His memoir unveils his own need to transmit to his family and girlfriend back home a sense of constant danger and participation in killing, and it is this disparity between his own convictions and the 'image' he felt necessary to send home that makes his memoir so frighteningly memorable. He shares his relationship to the men under his command, the multiple problems he confronted with personality types and aberrant situations, and the manner in which he grew as a man during his prolonged exposure to the underbelly of the commanding officers of the war. 'But to represent something is to command power over it. Maps are the tools of many ambitious people, of policy makers, commanders of armies, and youths who like to play at being one of those. And the problem is that the maps are easily confused with the world'. Where Kidder succeeds in his memoir about his war experience is in his brutal honesty, his fearless approach to report the reality of a war everyone is electing to forget, and the impact that Vietnam had on the mentality of the world and especially now with the youths who face another very similar war. His pacifism may annoy some readers, but his intelligence as a reporter and a writer cannot by ignored. As Kidder completed his tour, he observed a lifer, Major Great, on his way to back into Vietnam and ultimately society: 'I tried to imagine the life in front of him. Paperwork and acronyms and young men who wouldn't get dressed right. Too bad he wasn't a more prepossessing villain. But what a horrible life. Incomprehensible, really. And, of course, he probably walked off still shaking his head, thinking much the same about me.' Kidder has written a gripping book, one that would serve us all well to read - a different view of the long-term effect of Vietnam, and war in general. Grady Harp

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2006

    What Life Was Like For Most Soldiers In Vietnam

    As a Viet Nam War veteran, who spent 16 months in- country, I found My Detachment to be especially intriguing. Tracy Kidder¿s experience in Vietnam was not unlike my own. And. our stories are not atypical. NIne out of every 10 soldiers, sailors or airmen sent to southeast Asia fell into that category. Although perhaps not as intense as the daily regimen of the grunts who actually did the fighting, our lives in-country were filled with danger, tedium and the Mickey Mouse BS so typical of the military life of that era. In telling his own story, Kidder has told the story of thousands of others who did a tour in Nam. This book is definitely a must-read for anyone who was there. Those who weren¿t will get a real glimpse what Vietnam was like for most of the troops who were there.

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    Posted December 26, 2010

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    Posted January 3, 2011

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