My Dixie Home

My Dixie Home

5.0 2
by Jim Mills
     
 
In the post-millennium, bluegrass players are categorized as progressive, retro, or contemporary (which is somewhere in between). A few players, however, play traditional bluegrass without self-consciousness. A veteran of Ricky Skaggs' Kentucky Thunder, Jim Mills plays the music of Bill Monroe and

Overview

In the post-millennium, bluegrass players are categorized as progressive, retro, or contemporary (which is somewhere in between). A few players, however, play traditional bluegrass without self-consciousness. A veteran of Ricky Skaggs' Kentucky Thunder, Jim Mills plays the music of Bill Monroe and Lester Flatt with an honesty that reveals a natural inclination. My Dixie Home kicks off with a charged-up version of the title track featuring Skaggs' lead vocal and mandolin work. "Take the D Train" follows, and is one of several instrumental tracks that allows banjoist Mills and fiddler Stuart Duncan to show why their picking skills are in such demand. There are guest vocals by Tim O'Brien, Dan Tyminski, and Paul Brewster and additional instrumental support from bassist Barry Bales and mandolinist Adam Steffey. There's no grandstanding, despite the all-star guest list. And since Mills' approach is so straightforward, the material forms a unified album despite the multiple vocalists. There are a number of points of special interest. O'Brien provides a fine backwoods vocal on Dock Boggs' "Country Blues," while Brewster delivers a good version of Jimmy Skinner's "Will You Be Satisfied." The album ends with the spunky "I'll See You in My Dreams," an instrumental that gives Mills a chance to show off his guitar playing. My Dixie Home has an abundance of good picking and singing, and traditional bluegrass fans will not want to miss it.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/08/2002
Label:
Sugarhill
UPC:
0015891395128
catalogNumber:
3951
Rank:
337761

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My Dixie Home 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you love banjo pickin' at its finest, this album will quickly become your favorite. Mills has really outdone himself this time. Not only is his raw talent extremely evident, but he has gathered the cream of the bluegrass crop on this album. With the recent rise in bluegrass, beginning most recently with "O Brother Where Art Thou?", Mills gathered the singing voices that complimented his banjo playing best, including Dan Tyminski, better known as the voice of George Clooney in the movie. Other artists on the album include Ricky Skaggs, Adam Steffey, and Paul Brewster. There are a lot of people in the bluegrass world who have been waiting for Brewster and Tyminski to sing together. Well, wait no more, they are on this album together and combined with Mills excellent back-up banjo playing, if your toes aren't tapping to this, check your pulse.
Guest More than 1 year ago
On "My Dixie Home," North Carolinian Jim Mills presents a collection of vocals and instrumentals made popular by the likes of Earl Scruggs, J. D. Crowe, Sonny Osborne, Bill Monroe, The Stanley Brothers, Doc Watson, Delmore Brothers, Granpa Jones, and Merle Travis. Jim Mills has played in various bluegrass bands (Summer Wages, Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver, Bass Mountain Boys). He's been with Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky Thunder since 1997, and Mills is a multiple winner of the IBMA Banjo Player of the Year Award. With this solo project, Mills gives us a perfect showcase for his technical skill on banjo, and the album offers some splendid traditional bluegrass. Supporting musicians include Stuart Duncan (fiddle), Dan Tyminski (guitar), Adam Steffey (mandolin), and Barry Bales (bass). Dan Tyminski, Ricky Skaggs, Tim O'Brien and Paul Brewster contribute the vocals, which comprise seven tracks. Tragic Romance, Are You Waiting Just For Me, Little At A Time, and Goin' Back to the Blue Ridge Mountains were my favorites of the vocals. The title track, My Dixie Home, kicks off the project with a "train-like groove." Take The D Train then includes a medley of Train 45, Sally Goodin,' and Mama Blues that use a different fifth string tuning. The J.D. Crowe tune, "Black Jack," is given the old greased lighting treatment with a fast, driving, uptempo beat. I especially enjoyed Mills' rendition of "I'll See You In My Dreams," that closes the album with his bluesy thumbstyle guitar. I was impressed that "My Dixie Home" was recorded in just a three day period in May, 2002 with "as little overdubbing and compression as possible to capture the live feeling" of the music. For a solid project of traditional 'grass, this is one that fits the bill and gets my two thumbs up. (Joe Ross, staff writer, Bluegrass Now)