My Father's Daughter: A Memoir [NOOK Book]

Overview

A startling, compelling, yet affectionate portrait of an American entertainment legend by his youngest daughter, who for the first time writes about the man, his life, the accusations, and about the many people who surrounded him -- wives, friends, lovers, users, and sycophants -- from his Hoboken childhood through the notorious "Rat Pack," and beyond.

Complete with many never before seen photographs taken directly from family albums, and ...
See more details below
My Father's Daughter: A Memoir

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$16.72
BN.com price

Overview

A startling, compelling, yet affectionate portrait of an American entertainment legend by his youngest daughter, who for the first time writes about the man, his life, the accusations, and about the many people who surrounded him -- wives, friends, lovers, users, and sycophants -- from his Hoboken childhood through the notorious "Rat Pack," and beyond.

Complete with many never before seen photographs taken directly from family albums, and placing special emphasis on his later years and his marriage to Barbara Marx Sinatra, Tina's personal exploration of this difficult final period in her father's career will solidify our image of Sinatra as a great performer and reinforce him as something even greater: as a father, and as man.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Throughout his second and third marriages, Frank Sinatra remained devoted not only to his three children but to their mother, his first wife, Nancy. His youngest daughter, Tina, enjoyed a warm relationship with both those stepmothers, Ava Gardner and Mia Farrow. But when Frank married Barbara Marx, his discontent grew. He and his new bride became more distant from Tina, and the singer sought solace in a grueling tour schedule that would have a tested a man half his age. So difficult were his sunset years, writes Tina in her revealing memoir, My Father's Daughter, that "[m]y father didn't die -- he escaped."
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781439142172
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication date: 10/10/2000
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 328,732
  • File size: 6 MB

Meet the Author

Tina Sinatra was the executive producer of Sinatra, an award-winning five-hour miniseries based on her father's life that aired in 1992 on CBS. She lives in Los Angeles.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

As Dad's marriage entered its second decade, I heard a new concern from Vine (his majordomo at the Compound for over thirty years), who was with him more than anyone. Dad's lifestyle was becoming quiet to a fault. My father was growing more isolated, cut off from human contact.

As his wife become busier with the Barbara Sinatra Children's Center, a facility for abused children, Dad saw less of her. His own clock remained stubbornly nocturnal; his day would begin as Barbara's wound down. It gradually seemed that they were sharing an address and little more.

Nancy and I were not Dad's only losses. Jilly Rizzo wouldn't say much -- he wasn't that kind of man -- but we knew he felt unwelcome at the Compound. Thick-skinned as he was, Jilly might have put up with Barbara's cold front, but he couldn't stand to watch his best friend suffer. I knew what he was going through. There is no greater strain than to see someone you love become less than whole.

After a drink or two, according to Jilly, Barbara's mean streak would surface. She'd ridicule Dad, even call him a has-been. It could get so bad that Jilly would have to leave the room. By the mid-eighties, he'd stopped coming back. I was noticing more signs of depression in Dad. Our daily phone tradition flipped, as he initiated fewer of our calls. I'd call him instead, but I ached when I heard the sadness that resounded in three small words: "I miss you."

His emotions were easy to read; he was as transparent in conversation as in song. But the reading did me little good, because Dad was stuck in those emotions. It was no use to bring Barbara's offenses to his notice -- she wasn't going to change, and he was unable to intercede. To complain to him was like throwing rocks at a drowning man, so I decided to stop.

I just had to let Dad go.

* * * *

The less I saw of my father, the more I worried about him. By 1988, his calls had become less and less frequent. He sounded listless and groggy, especially when idle at home. I was used to his melancholy, but this was something more.

At one point, Vine reached out for help to my sister. She said that she'd been told to give Dad "these pills" every day, and she was concerned about them.

Within days, Nancy paid Dad a welcome visit. Over the weekend she perused the half-dozen prescription pill bottles on his breakfast table. She found a diuretic, a sleeping pill, a barbiturate (for dad's migraines), and a drug she'd never heard of, something called Elavil.

After doing some research, my sister grew alarmed. Though widely prescribed at the time as an antidepressant, Elavil was known for its significant side effects. The drug called for close and continual monitoring, and we feared that our father wasn't getting it. Nancy and I were also concerned about Dad taking sedatives on top of sedatives, given the fact that he still enjoyed his nightcaps. It seemed dangerous to us. But nothing we did or said made any headway. Barbara felt the Elavil was working perfectly. She said the doctor agreed that it was needed to level Dad's mood swings and spare his heart.

"Your father's actually doing very well," she told my sister. "He's feeling better. I don't want you to worry about it." Dad was less argumentative, less trouble all around. Life was easier, smoother, more predicable.

Dad's children knew that he felt well when he was feisty. Over months and years to come, that side of him would seem to disappear. Dad became strangely tractable and subdued. He expressed neither joy nor sadness; he was smack in that middle plane of nowhere.

While Dad was appearing in Reno, a trip Barbara had passed on, I flew out to meet him. I looked forward to seeing him, and to see him perform -- it had been a long time for me. But I was altogether unprepared for what I witnessed on stage that night. This consummate performer was unsure -- tentative in his demeanor, unsteady of voice. I had not witnessed this before, and could barely bring myself to watch.

Concerned, I suggested that we go up to his room after the show, but Dad wanted to stop in the lounge, where a few friends awaited us. No sooner had we ordered our drinks than Dad said he thought he'd better head to his room, after all. I stayed back a few minutes to be polite -- until I was summoned upstairs.

As I rushed into my father's room, I found him seated in a chair with his head down, pale and hyperventilating. Bill Stapely was having him breathe into a paper bag. After a long moment, it seemed to do the trick, but I was beyond terrified. According to Bill, Dad had forgotten that he'd already had his Elavil that day, and had taken a second dose by mistake.

I stayed with him till he slept, tuned to his every breath.

Dad's symptoms seemed to multiply by the month. Once the sharpest man I knew, with a phenomenal memory for numbers and dates, he became confused and forgetful. He'd get dizzy after standing up. At other times he'd lose his coordination and stumble. One day while driving, Dad found himself disoriented within blocks of the Compound. It happened only that once -- he voluntarily surrendered his keys, never drove again.

These were all textbook side effects of Elavil, and we had to wonder why Dad wasn't switched to a less sedating antidepressant. While Barbara continued to be satisfied that Dad was getting the care he needed, his decline was a painful thing to watch.

For the better part of his life, my father was a reluctant pill taker, one who'd treat a splitting headache with baby aspirin. He would never have accepted this smorgasbord of medications had he not been so depressed, so out of touch with himself.

Excerpted by permission of Simon & Schuster, Inc. Copyright © 2000 by Tina Sinatra.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 16 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 16 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 6, 2013

    Good Read

    This book was well done and presented a good view of the private Sinatra. Barbara Marx-Sinatra was married to Frank for 20 years and some of what irritated Tina seems petty. Had Frank not been happy he would have and could have packed up and walked out.

    To balance it I should read Barbara's version but I suspect she did not attack Frank's children.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 26, 2011

    Good

    Barbara's book was very good. Why do they blame her for anything when it was THEIR father who divorced their mother! Hello...........

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2011

    A Sinatra Fan Must

    I had read this book a year or 2 ago, and being a big Sinatra fan (big rat pack fan actually), I thought the book was very endearing. It gave you a inside look of what it was like to grow up around that type of Hollywood Royalty. And the heartfelt sorrow that also went with it towards the end of his life. I'm very curious now to read Babs(Sinatra's 4th wife) biography and compare the stories, to what were given from his daughters eyes.view

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2002

    Frank Sinatra

    I wish she had provided more information about his earlier years, specifically how he broke into the business. I thought it was poignant testimony of a daughter's devotion to her father, but also I had the sense that her life revolved too much around his. The story was mostly sad, but honest.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2001

    Tina Sinatra rocks!

    This book is one of the greatest biography/autobiography ever. She told it like it was, and how she felt, just like she should of. I laughed, cried, and was extremely angry at Barbara Marx for treating Frank Sinatra like that. I think it was an excellent book. Frank Sinatra is a legend, an icon, and more than a generous man. And Tina Sinatra told that. It made you feel like a Sinatra.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2001

    HEARTBREAKING...

    VERY ETHNIC. BEING ITALIAN HELPS YOU UNDERSTAND IT. THE PUBLIC NEVER REALIZED HOW WICKED BABS WAS. UNTIL THE END, HE REMAINED CONTROLLED BY PRESCRIPTION DRUGS AND EMOTIONAL MANIPULATION. VERY SAD.... HE SUFFERED MUCH GUILT.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2001

    sinatra's flame kept alive

    I think this was the best book that I have read yet. it show's Frank Sinatra the father, not Frank Sinatra the singer-actor-painter. its about a father and daugters relationship with each other. over all I praise Tina for speaking her mind on Barbara and her fathers mistakes. even if your not a Sinatra fan you will enjoy this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2001

    A recommended read!

    When I read the epilogue, I cried. This book is a loving tribute to a father she adorned and a performer we all loved. May he rest in peace.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2000

    from an old time bobby soxer

    enjoyed every minute of the book. learned things i never knew before, and cried at the end.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2000

    A Portrait of a Father

    This book forced me to know the man behind the legend, through his daughter's eyes. Tina clearly brings the truth to the surface, as she sees it. Sadness, bitterness, thought-provoking details, and a powerful love of a daughter for her legendary father. This is a portrait of a man as told from the heart.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2002

    loved the whole book - cover to cover

    I enjoyed the insight into the Sinatra family. Reading about their famous friends many who are now deceased. It put the family and FS on a realistic level. The family devotion was very touching. The book gave me a whole new appreciation for Frank Sinatra. Thank you Tina.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2001

    All about the wicked stepmother

    I waited months to read this book because it was costly in hardback.One day I walked into a Barnes & Noble store in Grand Rapids, Michigan and there it was for 75% off. I am so glad that my instinct told me to wait until it came down in p-roice because I would have wasted over $20.00 for a story about a very dysfunctional family and the wicked stepmother. There really was no story aboiut how Frank Sinatra started out in details. The interview she gave on 60 minutes took about about 3 pages to say it all over again. They were probably the best part of the book. Tina's paid back the wicked, controlling stepmother and described how the stepmother kept the Sinatra children away from their dad and manipulated Frank while he was ill. Being Italian and growing up on the east coast I smiled as I read about how the sauce was called gravy, how the mother stood by her husband and kept the family together, GOd bless her. If you can get the book for 75% off, then read it and form your own opinion.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2000

    Touching Home

    While the time frame of the book is sometimes confusing, I found the book to be entertaining and an overall success. A book of lifes' lessons. While they are not always fair, they certainly hit close to home.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 16 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)