My Father's Keeper: Children of Nazi Leaders - An Intimate History of Damage and Denial

Overview

My Father's Keeper is a uniquely illuminating addition to the dark literature of the Nazi era. In 1959 the German journalist Norbert Lebert conducted extensive interviews with the young sons and daughters of prominent Nazis: Rudolf Hess, Martin Bormann, Hermann Goring, Heinrich Himmler, et al. Forty years later, Lebert's son Stephan tracked down these same men and women to find out how they had lived their lives in the shadow of a horrifying heritage. Drawing on both sets of firsthand interviews, this revelatory ...
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Overview

My Father's Keeper is a uniquely illuminating addition to the dark literature of the Nazi era. In 1959 the German journalist Norbert Lebert conducted extensive interviews with the young sons and daughters of prominent Nazis: Rudolf Hess, Martin Bormann, Hermann Goring, Heinrich Himmler, et al. Forty years later, Lebert's son Stephan tracked down these same men and women to find out how they had lived their lives in the shadow of a horrifying heritage. Drawing on both sets of firsthand interviews, this revelatory work of history offers a fascinating, surprising, often disturbing view of modern Germany and Nazism's legacy. .
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316089753
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
  • Publication date: 3/12/2007
  • Edition description: 1st Back Bay Paperback Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 674,077
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.25 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Table of Contents

Prologue 1
For You Bear My Name 7
The 1959 Manuscript: Wolf-Rudiger Hess 21
Who Were the Fathers? 38
The 1959 Manuscript: Wolf-Rudiger Hess and the Nazi Women 54
On a Home Page the Story Continues 74
The 1959 Manuscript: Martin Bormann Junior 88
A Priest Offers a Warning about the Future 107
The 1959 Manuscript: Niklas and Norman Frank 122
A Man Wants to Destroy His Father 140
The 1959 Manuscript: Gudrun Himmler 154
An Embittered Daughter and the Not-Wanting-to-See Principle 180
The 1959 Manuscript: Edda Goring 197
A Sightseeing Tour of Munich in the Year 2000 210
The 1959 Manuscript: The von Schirach Brothers 226
A Final Meeting with the Lawyer 238
Afterword 244
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2001

    Interesting Subject, But...

    This book is about a fascinating subject. The author's father interviewed the 'Nazikinder,' children of prominent Nazis, back in 1959. The author followed up with most of them (those that would agree to be interviewed) in 2000. Most of these children were raised as 'royalty' within the Third Reich and wanted for absolutely nothing. The book therefore has the potential to be a very illuminating tome not only to people who love history but to those who love sociology and psychology as well. The translation, however, is absolutely abominable! The editor should have had the book translated from German into English, then checked the translation for readability. There are passages that make no sense whatsoever. There are other passages where the tenses keep changing and therefore render the information confusing as all get-out. I think this has the potential to be a better book than it is, and if the publisher were to give it another round of editing before it gets printed in softcover, it might become closer to what the author intended it to be in the original in German than it is at this moment.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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